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FY2013 Adopted Budget and FY2013-FY2015 Financial PlanFY2013 BUDGET & FY2013-2015 FINANCIAL PLAN for the City of Iowa City Terry Trueblood Recreation Area City of Iowa City Adopted Budget for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2013 & FY2012 - 2016 Capital Improvements Program (CIP) Council: ASSISTANT TO THE CITY MANAGER CITY MANAGER FINANCE DIRECTOR Tom Markus Geoff Fruin Kevin O’Malley MANAGEMENT BUDGET BUDGET ANALYST ANALYST ANALYST Leigh Lewis Simon Andrew Deb Mansfi eld FINANCE ADMIN ASSISTANT TO SECRETARY THE CITY MANAGER Cyndi Ambrose Adam Bentley Terry Dickens AT-LARGE Michelle Payne AT-LARGE JIM THROGMORTON DISTRICT C Susan Mims, Mayor Pro Tem AT-LARGE Matt Hayek, Mayor AT-LARGE Rick Dobyns DISTRICT A Connie Champion DISTRICT B APPRECIATION This financial plan includes the ideas and recommendations of many citizens, the City Council and City staff. During the year many suggestions are received from citizens in the City Council hearings and informal contacts. The major impact of the City Council upon this financial plan is in the priorities and programs adopted by the City Council during the current year. While other departments were intensely involved in the preparation of this financial plan, most of the credit for this document goes to the members of the Finance Department. Particular gratitude is expressed to the City Manager, Finance Director, Budget/Management Analysts, Finance Management Analyst, Finance Administrative Secretary, Document Services Center and Information Technology Services. While we surely appreciate all contributions to this budget, it must be remembered that the real thanks must go to the City employees, who, on a daily basis, transform this document into the City’s program of services. CITY OF IOWA CITY Adopted Budget for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 2013 and the FY2013 – 2015 Financial Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE City Manager’s Letter ........................................................................................................................ 1 All Funds Summaries ......................................................................................................................... 14 Organizational Chart ......................................................................................................................... 22 Strategic Plan Strategic Plan .............................................................................................................................. 23 Introduction to Financial Plan Financial & Fiscal Policies ........................................................................................................... 53 Preparation of the Financial Plan: Basis of Accounting .............................................................................................................. 63 Schedule ............................................................................................................................... 64 Process to Amend ................................................................................................................. 65 Budgetary Fund Structure .................................................................................................... 68 Fund Balance ....................................................................................................................... 69 Personnel Listing by Department / Full-Time Equivalents Comparison ...................................... 72 Reconciliation of Personnel Changes .......................................................................................... 74 General Fund Summary General Fund Revenue ............................................................................................................... 77 General Fund Expenditures ......................................................................................................... 82 General Fund Year-end Fund Balance ........................................................................................ 84 General Fund Financial Summaries ............................................................................................ 86 Public Safety Police Department: Summary ............................................................................................................................... 91 Administration ....................................................................................................................... 95 Patrol ..................................................................................................................................... 98 Criminal Investigation ............................................................................................................ 100 Records ................................................................................................................................. 102 ICPD Forfeitures ................................................................................................................... 103 Crossing Guards ................................................................................................................... 104 Crime Prevention .................................................................................................................. 105 TIPS ...................................................................................................................................... 106 Contracted Services .............................................................................................................. 106 Station Master ....................................................................................................................... 107 Grants… ................................................................................................................................ 108 Animal Care & Adoption .............................................................................................................. 110 Deer Control ................................................................................................................................ 113 Fire Department Summary ............................................................................................................................... 114 Fire Station Four Operations ................................................................................................. 120 Equipment Replacement Reserve ........................................................................................ 120 Housing & Inspection Services: Summary ............................................................................................................................... 121 Administration ....................................................................................................................... 124 Housing Inspection................................................................................................................ 126 Building Inspection ................................................................................................................ 129 Public Works Summary ..................................................................................................................................... 133 Public Works Administration........................................................................................................ 136 Engineering.................................................................................................................................. 138 Culture and Recreation Library: Summary ............................................................................................................................... 141 Operations............................................................................................................................. 145 Replacement Reserves………………………………………………………………………... .... 146 Miscellaneous Other Funds .................................................................................................. 147 Parks & Recreation: Summary .............................................................................................................................. 148 Administration ...................................................................................................................... 150 Parks .................................................................................................................................... 151 Recreation ............................................................................................................................ 154 Forestry ................................................................................................................................ 160 CBD Maintenance ................................................................................................................ 162 Cemetery .............................................................................................................................. 164 Government Buildings .......................................................................................................... 166 Senior Center .............................................................................................................................. 168 Senior Center Gift Fund ........................................................................................................ 174 New Horizons Band .............................................................................................................. 174 Community and Economic Development Planning and Community Development: Summary ............................................................................................................................... 175 PCD Administration ............................................................................................................... 178 Urban Planning & Historic Preservation ................................................................................ 180 Neighborhood Services ......................................................................................................... 182 Public Art ............................................................................................................................... 184 Community Development Non-Grant Activity........................................................................ 186 Human Services Planning ..................................................................................................... 188 Aid to Agencies ..................................................................................................................... 189 Economic Development ........................................................................................................ 191 Downtown Incubator Feasibility Study ................................................................................. 194 Downtown Donation Stations ................................................................................................ 194 General Government City Council .................................................................................................................................. 195 City Manager ............................................................................................................................... 197 City Clerk ..................................................................................................................................... 200 Human Resources ....................................................................................................................... 203 City Attorney ................................................................................................................................ 205 Human Rights .............................................................................................................................. 207 Finance Department: Summary ............................................................................................................................... 210 Finance Administration ......................................................................................................... 212 Non-Operational Administration ............................................................................................ 214 Community Event & Program Funding ................................................................................. 215 Accounting & Reporting ........................................................................................................ 217 Purchasing ............................................................................................................................ 219 Revenue ................................................................................................................................ 221 Document Services ............................................................................................................... 223 Risk Management – Tort Liability .......................................................................................... 225 Special Revenue Funds Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) – Metro Entitlement .......................................... 227 H.O.M.E. Program ....................................................................................................................... 229 Road Use Tax Fund (RUT) ........................................................................................................ 231 Energy Efficiency & Conservation Grant ..................................................................................... 234 UniverCity Neighborhood Partnerships ....................................................................................... 236 Flood Recovery & Mitigation Grants ............................................................................................ 238 Employee Benefits ....................................................................................................................... 241 Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts ...................................................................................... 243 Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC): Summary ............................................................................................................................... 248 Administration ....................................................................................................................... 251 Transportation Planning ........................................................................................................ 252 Rural Community Assistance (ECICOG) ............................................................................. 252 General Rehabilitation & Improvement Program (GRIP) ............................................................ 253 Peninsula Apartments ................................................................................................................. 255 Debt Service Debt Service ................................................................................................................................ 257 Business Type Activities Transportation Services: Parking Operations ............................................................................................................... 263 Parking Debt Service ........................................................................................................... 268 Transit Operations ................................................................................................................ 269 Wastewater Treatment: Wastewater Treatment Operations ....................................................................................... 274 Wastewater Treatment Debt Service .................................................................................... 279 Water: Water Operations .................................................................................................................. 280 Water Debt Service ............................................................................................................... 283 Refuse Collection Operations ...................................................................................................... 284 Landfill ........................................................................................................................................ 288 Airport Operations ....................................................................................................................... 294 Storm Water Management .......................................................................................................... 297 Broadband Telecommunications ................................................................................................. 300 Housing Authority ........................................................................................................................ 303 Internal Service Funds Equipment: Fund Summary ..................................................................................................................... 307 General Fleet Maintenance ................................................................................................... 309 Equipment Replacement Reserve ........................................................................................ 310 Information Technology Services (ITS): Fund Summary ..................................................................................................................... 311 Risk Management Loss Reserves ............................................................................................... 315 Central Services .......................................................................................................................... 317 Health Insurance Reserve ........................................................................................................... 319 Dental Insurance Reserve ........................................................................................................... 320 Appendix A Performance Measures Introduction ........................................................................................................................... A-1 Police .................................................................................................................................... A-2 Fire……… ............................................................................................................................. A-11 Housing & Inspection Services ............................................................................................. A-19 Library ................................................................................................................................... A-27 Senior Center ........................................................................................................................ A-37 Transportation Services ........................................................................................................ A-41 Airport .................................................................................................................................... A-50 Appendix B State Forms ................................................................................................................................. B-1 City Council Budget Resolutions ................................................................................................. B-10 Transfers-In ................................................................................................................................. B-13 Transfers-Out .............................................................................................................................. B-16 Property Taxes: Taxable Valuations by Class ................................................................................................. B-19 Overlapping Tax Levies for the Iowa City Area ..................................................................... B-20 Tax Rate Comparison ........................................................................................................... B-21 FY2012 Revenue Comparisons: Utility Rates ........................................................................................................................... B-25 Summary of Revenue Bond Indebtedness .................................................................................. B-26 Glossary....................................................................................................................................... B-27 Index by Division .......................................................................................................................... B-31 Capital Improvement Program (CIP) FY2012– 2016 Program Summary .............................................................................................. C-1 Project Summary by Name ......................................................................................................... C-2 Projects by Funding Source – Receipt Detail ............................................................................... C-36 Strategic Plan June 2012 Status Report ...................................................................................... C-44 Recurring Projects ....................................................................................................................... C-50 Unfunded Projects FY2017 and Beyond ...................................................................................... C-51 June, 2012 To the Honorable Mayor and City Council Members: With this letter, I am transmitting the City of Iowa City adopted budget for fiscal year 2012-2013. Although an annual budget is required to be adopted by Iowa State Code, the three-year financial plan (2013-2015) and five-year capital improvement program (2012-2016) are included for planning purposes. A financial plan is one of the most important documents that a City prepares because it identifies the services to be provided and how those services are to be financed. You will note that the budget document is considerably different in format from prior years. With a strategic plan in place, we are in the process of adding performance measurement, goals and objectives to the budgetary units. We are hopeful that these changes will provide the reader with an improved understanding of municipal operations and how budgetary decisions relate to city council’s established priorities. PRIORITIES & ISSUES Over the course of the past year, we undertook a strategic planning effort which identified the city’s main goals for the foreseeable future. The following issue areas were identified as priorities:  Economic and community development  Development of the downtown and near downtown areas  Neighborhood stabilization  A strong and sustainable financial foundation  Coordinated communication and customer service orientation It is our intent to support these initiatives through budget appropriations, departmental operations, and employee direction so that the organization as a whole is moving in the same direction. There were two uncertainties which influenced the preparation of this budget: 1) uncertainties in the national economy and their potential impact on municipal operations; and 2) proposals by both the governor and state legislature for revisions to commercial property tax law. Fortunately, economic conditions have remained stable enough that further adjustment to the proposed budget were not necessary, and the 2012 legislative session closed without passing a property tax reform bill. We are seeing lower growth in property tax valuations when compared with prior years. Revaluation occurs biennially and the FY2013 budget is based on a revaluation year (2011) in which total property valuation growth was approximately two percent (2%). - 1 - In addition to this, a recent judgment by the Iowa Supreme Court has generated a number of appeals with county assessors across the state for reclassification of multi- unit structures from commercial to residential. Residential properties are subject to an assessment limitation order in the state of Iowa which established taxable value at 50.75% of assessed value in FY2013, versus the 100% taxable value used for commercial properties. Since the final ruling in 2011, a number of commercial property owners in Iowa City have formed cooperative housing units in order to qualify for reclassification as residential property. This trend is expected to continue in future years. The combined effect of slower growth in valuations and the loss of taxable value due to cooperative housing conversions has limited growth in property tax revenue. This will require continued review of city operations, service delivery, and alternative revenue sources. BUDGET GOALS My goals in developing this year’s budget were to:  Reduce costs where possible, while continuing to provide high quality services  Identify and eliminate redundancies that may exist within the organization  Examine existing and potential new revenue sources  Promote and plan for economic development and redevelopment throughout the City to ensure strong property values  Determine appropriate staffing levels  Provide for necessary improvements to existing infrastructure and prioritize capital projects  Uphold fiscal integrity and maintain adequate cash reserves FINANCIAL PLAN OVERVIEW Iowa City’s taxable valuation increased 4.6% for FY2013 due to the State of Iowa increasing the rollback limitation. The assessment limitation order (rollback) worked in our favor this year due to a significant increase in agricultural land valuations across the state. We do not expect this trend to continue. Projections for the second and third years (FY2014-2015) are based on building permits and remain flat at two percent (2%). With the estimated taxable valuations, Iowa City is proposing a decrease in the overall tax rate, down (3.21%) from FY2012. The following graphs depict taxable valuations, tax revenue, tax levies, and the percent of change from previous year. - 2 - - 3 - The F (3.21% comb (rollba The to Code individ FY20 Trans highlig FY2013 tota %) less th ined effect ack) and th otal tax rate of Iowa S dual levy r 13 is down sit operation ghts sectio al property han the FY t of annual e City levy e is compri Section 384 ates for FY n (9.4%) w ns to a Bus n of this do tax rate is Y2012 tax changes i rate. sed of a nu 4 for spec Y2012-2013 hen compa siness-type ocument. $17.269 pe x rate. Th in assessed umber of in cific purpos 3. Of note ared with th e Fund. Th er $1,000 o he followin d valuation ndividual lev ses. The e, the Emp he FY2012 his is discus of taxable v ng graphic ns, assessm vies, as pro following c ployee Ben 2 due to re ssed furthe valuation, a illustrates ment limita ovided for in chart comp efit tax lev classificatio er in the bu nd is s the tions n the pares vy for on of udget - 4 - The City's property tax asking for FY2012 and FY2013 are as follows: + The following chart demonstrates the combined effect that the assessment limitation order (rollback) and decreased levy rate will have on residential properties in Iowa City between FY2012 and FY2013. Dollars Tax Rate per $1,000 Dollars Tax Rate per $1,000 General Fund Tax Levies: General 22,460,112$ 8.100 23,486,337$ 8.100 Transit 2,634,211$ 0.950 2,754,570$ 0.950 Tort Liability 961,321$ 0.347 907,298$ 0.313 Library 748,670$ 0.270 782,878$ 0.270 Subtotal:26,804,314$ 9.667 27,931,083$ 9.633 Special Revenue Levies: Emergency -$ - -$ - Employee Benefits 9,776,526$ 3.526 9,257,850$ 3.193 Subtotal:9,776,526$ 3.526 9,257,850$ 3.193 Debt Service 13,009,149$ 4.649 12,934,350$ 4.443 Total City Levy Property Taxes:49,589,988$ 17.842 50,123,283$ 17.269 % C hange f rom prior year:3.78% 0.48% 1.08% -3.21% FY2012 Certified FY2013 Adopted LEVIES FY2013 $876 FY2012 $866 FY2012 FY2013 Assessed Valuation $100,000 $ 100,000 Taxable Valuation $ 48,530 $ 50,752 City Levy $ 17.842 $ 17.269 Property Taxes $ 866 $ 876 Estimated Property Tax on $100,000 Residential Valuation (Iowa City portion) - 5 - Revenue projections for the Special Revenue Funds are based on authorized grants and funding from other entities. User fee estimates for business-type activities are based on FY2011 actuals and assume one percent (1%) growth, annually. EXPENDITURE TRENDS & PROJECTIONS  Personnel costs are projected to decrease in FY2013 as we return to 26 pay days, versus the 27 pay days in FY2012 (estimated at $1.1 million). Staff reductions by attrition were not amended for in FY2012 but are reflected in projections for FY2013. The cost of employee benefits is increasing at a greater pace than wages due to legislated increases in retirement contributions. Wages and benefits for most employees are determined by collective bargaining agreements. A three-year agreement with the Fire union will expire June 30, 2013; AFSCME and Police unions have three-year contracts in place for July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2015. Following is a summary of the cost of living adjustments (COLAs) negotiated by each of the unions: Cost of living adjustments for administrative, confidential, and supervisory employees have been approved at the same rate as union employees for FY2013. FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 Actual Budget Budget Projected Projected Salary & Wages 36,220,743$ 39,788,112$ 39,002,909$ 39,992,307$ 41,057,695$ Group Insurance 7,130,293 7,404,731 7,101,120 7,291,358 7,489,837 FICA 2,140,466 2,336,648 2,287,260 2,339,269 2,397,626 Retirement Contributions 3,465,304 4,676,438 4,974,345 5,581,353 6,030,922 Other Employee Benefits 110,096 102,316 107,140 107,140 107,140 Total Employee Benefits 12,846,159 14,520,133 14,469,865 15,319,120 16,025,525 Total Personnel Costs 49,066,902$ 54,308,245$ 53,472,774$ 55,311,427$ 57,083,220$ Benefits as a % of Personnel Costs 26% 27% 27% 28% 28% Cost of Living Adjustments (COLAs)FY2015 Union Agreement June 24, 2012 Dec 23, 2012 July 7, 2013 Jan. 5, 2014 July 6, 2014 AFSCME 1.4% 1.5% 1.3% 1.3% 2.2% Police (PLR)1.4% 1.5* 1.3% 1.25* 2.2% Fire (ICAPFF / IAFF / AFL-CIO) 1.4% 1.5% N/A N/A N/A *Formula for 12/23/12 and 01/05/14 increases varies for PLR members, applying to Step 6 employees only. FY2014FY2013 - 6 -  Health insurance premiums and administrative costs are projected to increase one percent (1%) in FY2013 due to a lower-than-average claims experience in recent years and increased employee contributions in fiscal years 2013 – 2015. An increase in employee contributions was negotiated in the AFSCME and Police union agreements as shown in the following table: Three percent (3%) premium increases are projected for health insurance in FY2014 and FY2015.  Retirement Contributions - IPERS: The Iowa Public Employees’ Retirement System (IPERS) maintains a 60/40 split between employer and employee plan contributions, the employer share is set to increase from 8.07% in FY2012 to 8.67% in FY2013. Legislation passed in 2010 does allow IPERS to adjust the combined contribution rate by up to one percent (1.0%) annually as of July 1, 2012. IPERS covers all municipal employees, with the exception of sworn police officers and fire fighters. Health Insurance Plan:FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 Single Deductible 200$ 350$ 350$ 350$ 500$ Family Deductible 200 350 425 450 700 Single Co-Pay 600 / 650 800 825 840 900 Family Co-Pay 600 / 650 800 950 1,100 1,450 Single Contribution/Month 20 40 40 40 40 Family Contribution/Month 60 60 70 75 80 Note: The Unions bargained for different amounts in FY2011. IPERS Retirement Contributions FY2011 Actual FY2012 Budget FY2013 Budget FY2014 Projected FY2015 Projected Employer Contribution:6.95% 8.07% 8.67% 8.67% 8.67% Employee Contribution:4.50% 5.38% 5.78% 5.78% 5.78% Total Annual Rate:11.45% 13.45% 14.45% 14.45% 14.45% All Budgetary Funds: (in millions)1.76$ 2.34$ 2.47$ 2.53$ 2.60$ % Increase in dollars:5.4% 33.0% 5.6% 2.3% 2.6% % Increase in employer rate: 4.5% 16.1% 7.4% 0.0% 0.0% % Increase in employee rate: 4.7% 19.6% 7.4% 0.0% 0.0% - 7 -  Retirement Contributions - MFPRSI: The Municipal Fire & Police Retirement System of Iowa (MFPRSI) Board of Trustees sets annual contribution rates for cities and employees based on independent actuarial opinion. The rate for FY2013 has been approved at 26.12%, and is expected to increase to 30.90% by FY2014 and 33.80% by FY2015. The employee contribution is currently fixed at 9.40%. As a result of significant increases in recent years and an unbalanced contribution formula, the Iowa League of Cities is advocating for legislative changes to the System.  Services and Supplies: We continue to utilize zero-base budgeting for all professional services, training and education. All other expenditure projections for services and supplies are based on FY2011 actuals. A considerable increase in vehicle fuel prices occurred gradually over the course of FY2011 and on into early FY2012. For this reason, gasoline and diesel fuel costs are projected at eleven and twelve percent (11%, 12%), respectively for FY2012 and FY2013, and two percent (2%) in FY2014 and FY2015. MFPRSI - Public Safety Retirement Contribution Annual Contribution Rate (as a % of wages) FY2011 Actual FY2012 Budget FY2013 Budget FY2014 Projected FY2015 Projected Employer Contribution 19.90% 24.76% 28.08% 30.90% 33.80% Employee Contribution 9.4% 9.4% 9.4% 9.4% 9.4% Total Annual Rate:29.3% 34.2% 37.5% 40.3% 43.2% General Fund Expense: 1,653,589$ 2,273,077$ 2,647,296$ 3,012,021$ 3 ,395,578$ % Increase in dollars:22.7% 37.5% 16.5% 13.8% 12.7% % Increase in employer rate: 17.1% 24.4% 13.4% 10.0% 9.4% % Increase in employee rate: 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% FY2008 FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 FY2012* Gasohol 27% -26% 9% 22% 19% Diesel 38% -26% 1% 24% 18% Annual Percentage Change (%) in Average Weekly Rack Price Note: Based on Friday prices. *FY2012 data is through 08.10.11; $.22 swing from 07.08.11 to 08.10.11. - 8 - Fuel prices also influenced our projections for goods and services due to transportation costs. We have assumed a four percent (4%) CPI in FY2012 and FY2013 for all supplies, as well as for services which are transportation-heavy such as hauling, courier and postal services. For other services (repair and maintenance, printing, databank and financial services), we’ve assumed a two percent (2%) CPI for FY2012 and 2013, and 1.8% for FY2014-15. This includes intra-city charges for administrative services provided to the business-type funds. Property, casualty and liability insurance costs are projected at five percent (5%) annually. Natural gas and electric rates are not projected to increase until calendar year 2014, at which point we’ve allowed for a five percent (5%) rate increase.  Capital Improvements: We utilize zero-based budgeting for capital outlay in excess of $5,000. Capital improvements in excess of $25,000 are budgeted within the five-year capital improvements program (CIP). Total of all capital improvements for FY2013 is $49.6 million, with $46.0 million in the capital improvement program (CIP). Annual repair and maintenance projects budgeted within the CIP total $2.57 million for FY2013. Overall, the City’s fund balance is projected to decrease by $9.6 million in FY2013 due to redemption of $5.6 million in General Obligation Bonds, Series 2004 from tax increment financing cash on hand; and a July 1, 2012 advance refunding of $4.9 million Water Revenue Bonds, Series 2002 from bond proceeds received in FY2012. FY2013 BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS General Fund: There are no new service initiatives presented with this budget. We are able to present a balanced General Fund budget in FY2013 through a combination of changes made in operations and a number of external factors.  A reduction in the city property tax levy was possible due to reclassification of Transit Operations to a business-type activity outside of General Fund.  Employer contribution rates from the MFPRSI and IPERS pension systems are lower than previously estimated.  Health insurance premiums and administrative costs are projected to increase one percent (1%) in FY2013 due to a lower-than-average claims experience in recent years and increased deductibles, co-pays and employee premium contributions in fiscal years 2013 – 2015.  Staffing levels have been reduced by (3.5) FTEs. This includes (.50) Human Rights Investigator, (1.0) Associate Planner and (2.0) Document Services Specialist) - 9 -  A $28.00 Electronic Plat Submission Fee will go into effect as of July 1, 2012, with revenue assigned to Housing Inspection. Transit Operations – Fund Reclassification & Fare Increase: Since FY2008, Court Street Transportation Facility has generated surplus revenue for Transit Operations, making it viable as a business-type activity. For this reason, Transit Operations will be reclassified as a business-type activity at the start of FY2013, with existing cash balances transferred out of General Fund. This change also eliminates funding from the Employee Benefits Levy, which would have generated an estimated $966,000 for Transit Operations in FY2013.1 To further assist in balancing Transit’s FY2013 budget, there will be a restructuring of transit routes, privatization of the auto body repair function, and a fee increase from $.75 per ride to $1.00 per ride this fiscal year. Bus pass fees are also recommended to increase 28%. The last bus fare increase was in 1997. Stormwater Management - Fee Increase: A 25% rate increase has been approved for FY2013 which is projected to generate an additional $160,000 annually. This is the second year of a proposed three-year rate increase. User fees will be increase from $2.50/month per Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU) to $3.00/month. These rate increases are necessary to provide funding for stormwater capital projects including $250,000 in FY2012 for Scott Park Development and $250,000 for Lower Muscatine / Kirkwood to First Avenue. An additional $500,000 is budgeted in FY2015 for improvements to the system near Riverside Drive and the University of Iowa Arts Campus. UniverCity Neighborhood Partnerships: A proposal was submitted by staff to continue this program on a smaller scale in FY13, utilizing a combination of City funds ($160,000 from General Fund) for renovation costs and $100,000 from the University of Iowa for down-payment assistance, as well as a small repair program for landlords and homeowners. Local banking institutions will continue to provide low-interest loans for the acquisition of the properties during the renovation phase. Staff Reductions: In an effort to streamline operations and reduce costs, department directors and I have begun the task of reviewing city services as permanent staff positions are vacated. This review began in early 2011. Through this process, we identified (11.12) FTEs city-wide for elimination by attrition. An additional reduction of (4.0) FTEs was proposed with this financial plan. Specific position changes can be found on pages 74-75 of this document. Department directors are evaluating and reassigning essential duties of the eliminated positions in order to maintain a level of service acceptable to internal and external customers. It is my intent to continue this program and monitor the effect of these decisions in the coming year. Aaa Bond Rating: The City continues to maintain its Moody’s Investor Services’ Aaa bond rating, which is the highest rating achievable. This rating has been accomplished 1 The employee benefits levy can only be utilized for General Fund and Road Use Tax Fund employee benefits per Iowa Code. - 10 - through prudent financial management, a strong local economy, and healthy financial reserves. The General Fund’s unassigned fund balance, which is an indicator of the City’s financial well-being, is projected at 27-30% of expenditures, in line with Council’s cash balance financial policy. General obligation bond issues planned for FY2013 – 2015 are estimated at $10.2, $7.9 and $3.5 million, respectively. Bond Refunding / Redemption: The municipal bond market continues to be in our favor. Due to the unusually low interest rates, Iowa City’s financial advisor continues to work closely with the Finance Director to identify interest savings on previously issued bonds. Water Revenue Bonds, Series 2003, will be refunded on July 1, 2012 with an estimated interest savings of $688,000. General Obligation Bonds, Series 2004, will be redeemed on June 1, 2013 utilizing TIF monies. The FY2012 - 2016 Capital Improvements Program (CIP): The five-year program continues to reflect council-stated priorities from prior fiscal years; placing emphasis on flood recovery and mitigation projects and economic development initiatives. Federal and state grant revenue is budgeted at $113.3 million over the five-year period FY2012- 2016. Local Option Sales Tax revenue, approved by voter referendum for flood recovery projects, ends in FY2014 and is expected to provide $32.4 million for the same time period. Significant projects planned for the immediate / near-term include (project costs are for FY2012-2016):  Iowa City Multi-Use Parking Facility ($15.6 million): A new multi-use parking/ commercial / residential facility is proposed at the intersection of Linn and Court Streets with construction to begin in FY2013. This project will provide an additional 600 parking spaces, with financing to come from the Parking Fund ($4.6 million) and parking revenue bonds ($11.0 million). The commercial/workforce residential component is expected to be built by a private developer.  South Wastewater Plant Expansion ($49 million): This project will redirect and consolidate North Treatment Plant operations into the South Treatment Plant. Project estimate does not include demolition of the north facility ($5 million). Funding sources are to include $32.6 million in federal and state grants, $13.6 million from local option sales tax revenue and $1.9 million from user fees / cash on-hand.  Iowa City Gateway Project ($34.2 million): This project will reconstruct and elevate 4,200 feet of Dubuque Street, Park Road Bridge and adjacent trails. Project funding includes 20.2 million from local option sales tax, $11.5 million in grant funding and $2.1 million from general obligation bonds.  Taft Speedway Levee Project ($11.8 million): This project will provide flood protection the Idyllwild neighborhood and Parkview Church area, and assist in - 11 - maintaining access to the Peninsula neighborhood during flooding conditions by protecting Foster Road. Funding includes $8.0 million in state disaster assistance and $3.7 million from general obligation bonds.  Terry Trueblood Recreati on Area ($8.0 million): This is the final year for this project’s phased development of the former S&G Materials site on South Gilbert Street / Sand Road. Funding is to include $2.2 million from state grants, $4.6 million from general obligation bonds, $600,000 from General Fund and $550,000 in contributions / donations.  First Avenue / Iowa Illinois Railroad Crossing Improvements ($6.6 million): This project will construct an overpass to replace the at-grade crossing of the IAIS Railroad at First Avenue. Funding sources include $2.4 million in federal grants and $4.0 million from general obligation bonds.  Landfill Gas to Energy Project ($2.0 million): This is a joint project with the University of Iowa which will utilize landfill gas for energy production at the Oakdale Campus. Iowa City’s contribution to the project includes $2.0 million from Landfill Operations for methane gas conditioning and compression equipment.  Airport improvement projects total $1.65 million in FY2013, with 95% in federal grant funding.  Dubuque / I-80 Pedestrian Bridge ($2.1 million): This pedestrian bridge extends an existing pedestrian trail north along Dubuque Street, crossing the interstate and providing a connection to the Butler Bridge Trailhead.  Burlington / Madison Intersecti on and Median ($1.6 million): This project will reconstruct the intersection of Burlington and Madison to improve pedestrian and traffic flows, including a landscaped median from the Iowa River to Madison Street. Water and sewer mains will be replaced during the course of construction. The project is designed to address changes related to the U of I Recreation Center and future growth. Funding includes a $700,000 contribution from the University of Iowa and $400,000 in state grant funding.  Animal Shelter Relocation & Replacement ($4.3 million ): While this project is currently budgeted in FY2012, an extension request has been filed with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for construction through 2015. Federal funding is approved for a structure of equivalent size and scope as the facility destroyed in the flood. Staff is currently working with other jurisdictions to determine their needs and intended participation in order to size the facility appropriately. - 12 - - 13 - Financ Revenu Taxes Other C License Use of M Intergo v Charges Miscella Transfe r Debt Sa Sale of A Total R - All F u cial Comp ue & Other ity Taxes es & Permits Money & Pro vernmental s for Service aneous rs in ales Assets Revenue & unds: parisons Sources s operty es & Other So u – All Fun urces nds FY2011 Actual 48,679, 10,865,4 1,413, 1,505, 39,614, 40,653, 7,410, 46,972, 29,283, 1,194,4 227,592, FY Am Bu 501 50 460 11 665 1 531 1 750 89 159 40 013 5 625 96 746 17 494 3 944 317 Y2012 ended udget 0,440,767 1,149,084 1,223,447 1,264,679 9,253,297 0,807,916 5,889,590 6,551,554 7,267,000 3,863,330 7,710,664 FY2013 Adopted Budget 50,914 11,031 1,440 1,535 38,627 41,066 3,771 54,738 11,000 944 215,069 3 d t ,435 ,846 ,389 ,026 ,081 ,638 ,813 ,103 ,000 ,650 ,981 - 14 - FY2011 Actual FY2012 Amended Budget FY2013 Adopted Budget % Chg from Prior Yr Taxes Levied on Property 47,825,752 49,594,682 50,407,375 2% Delinquent Property Taxes 7,688 0 0 TIF Revenues 846,061 846,085 507,060 -40% Other City Taxes: Utility Tax Replacement Excise Taxes 819,975 862,430 773,713 725,479 840,000 853,000 Mobile Home Taxes 69,414 66,654 65,546 Hotel/Motel Taxes 745,526 780,000 739,587 Other Local Option Taxes 8,505,066 8,600,000 8,600,000 Total - Other City Taxes 10,865,460 11,149,084 11,031,846 -1% Licenses & Permits 1,413,665 1,223,447 1,440,389 18% Use of Money & Property 1,505,531 1,264,679 1,535,026 21% Intergovernmental: Federal Grants & Reimbursements 10,214,773 50,002,802 26,091,621 Road Use Taxes 5,890,842 5,863,720 6,379,028 Other State Grants & Reimbursements 20,963,655 30,230,302 2,500,298 Local Grants & Reimbursements 2,545,480 3,156,473 3,656,134 Total - Intergovernmental 39,614,750 89,253,297 38,627,081 -57% Charges for Services Water Utility 8,031,705 8,501,949 8,184,531 Sewer Utility 12,758,469 12,752,498 12,758,469 Parking 4,152,945 3,803,667 3,701,583 Landfill/Garbage 8,249,946 8,233,856 8,303,889 Transit 1,751,041 1,808,110 2,135,500 Cable TV, Internet & Telephone 804,200 786,726 814,200 Housing Authority 78 0 78 Storm Water Utility 630,966 783,759 950,000 Other Fees & Charges for Service 4,273,809 4,137,351 4,218,388 Total - Charges for Services 40,653,159 40,807,916 41,066,638 1% Miscellaneous 7,410,013 5,889,590 3,771,813 -36% Other Financing Sources: Regular Operating Transfers In 46,972,625 95,501,560 54,738,103 Internal TIF Loan Transfers In 0 1,049,994 0 Proceeds of Debt 29,283,746 17,267,000 11,000,000 Proceeds of Capital Asset Sales 1,194,494 3,863,330 944,650 Total - Other Financing Sources 77,450,865 117,681,884 66,682,753 -43% Total Revenues & Other Financing Sources:227,592,944 317,710,664 215,069,981 -32% Utility franchise tax City of Iowa City - All Funds Total Revenues & Other Financing Sources by Revenue Type - ALL FUNDS - - 15 - - 16 - - 17 - Expend Public S Public W Health & Culture Commu Genera l Debt Se Governm Propriet Transfe r Total E Transf ditures & T Safety Works & Social Se & Recreatio unity & Eco n l Governme ervice mental Cap tary / Busine rs-Out Expenditur fers Out - A Transfers O rvices on nomic Deve nt ital Projects ess-Type Fu res & All Funds: Out $ lopment s unds $ FY2011 Actual 18,703,3$ 13,434,3 - 11,804,9 19,119,5 7,460,3 14,053,2 18,654,7 69,838,4 46,972,6 220,041,5$ FY Am B u 397 22$ 330 14 - 919 12 500 24 374 8 245 28 703 80 459 91 625 96 552 380$ Y2012 ended udget ,167,577 ,178,323 - ,898,367 ,882,370 ,283,931 ,725,872 ,670,510 ,866,575 ,551,554 ,225,079 FY2013 Adopted Budget 21,449,8$ 7,718, 290,7 12,685,4 7,217,6 7,618,6 20,226,0 25,723,6 67,003,7 54,738, 224,672,0$ 3 d t 889 182 707 436 647 655 046 659 751 103 075 - 18 - Governmental Activities FY2011 Actual FY2012 Amended Budget FY2013 Adopted Budget % Chg from Prior Year Public Safety Police Department/Crime Prevention 9,953,601 11,341,839 11,503,375 Fire Department 6,233,120 7,532,403 7,300,212 Building Inspections 1,544,709 1,660,827 1,645,323 Animal Control 597,548 748,358 728,699 Other Public Safety 374,419 884,150 272,280 Total - Public Safety 18,703,397 22,167,577 21,449,889 -3.2% Public Works Roads, Bridges, & Sidewalks 2,832,032 3,562,456 3,659,485 Street Lighting 554,733 502,280 502,636 Traffic Control and Safety 1,049,002 1,054,282 1,053,412 Snow Removal 788,961 363,854 506,487 Highway Engineering 1,124,037 1,321,826 1,281,936 Street Cleaning 322,697 12,413 86,684 Other Public Works 6,762,868 7,361,212 627,542 Total - Public Works 13,434,330 14,178,323 7,718,182 -45.6% Health & Social Services Other Health and Social Services - - 290,707 Total - Health & Social Services - - 290,707 N/A Culture & Recreation Library Services 5,567,595 5,863,980 5,822,606 Parks 2,172,243 2,430,559 2,327,128 Recreation 2,891,578 3,210,426 3,292,076 Cemetery 372,868 407,382 369,553 Other Culture and Recreation 800,635 986,020 874,073 Total - Culture & Recreation 11,804,919 12,898,367 12,685,436 -1.7% Community & Economic Development Community Beautification 539,256 719,391 536,273 Economic Development 538,370 1,121,935 921,678 Housing and Urban Renewal 2,062,332 1,861,456 1,453,265 Planning & Zoning 749,477 881,513 749,917 Other Com & Econ Development 15,230,065 20,298,075 3,556,514 Total - Community & Economic Development 19,119,500 24,882,370 7,217,647 -71.0% General Government Mayor, Council, & City Manager 604,418 792,808 658,625 Clerk, Treasurer, & Finance Adm.3,081,072 3,482,623 3,266,143 Legal Services & City Attorney 601,425 675,608 671,956 City Hall & General Buildings 479,595 515,138 511,382 Tort Liability 1,000,494 977,511 922,125 Other General Government 1,693,370 1,840,243 1,588,424 Total - General Government 7,460,374 8,283,931 7,618,655 -8.0% City of Iowa City - All Funds Total Expenditures & Transfers Out By State Program Area - ALL FUNDS - - 19 - Governmental Activities FY2011 Actual FY2012 Amended Budget FY2013 Adopted Budget % Chg from Prior Year Debt Service 14,053,245 28,725,872 20,226,046 -29.6% Gov Capital Projects 18,654,703 79,620,516 25,723,659 TIF Capital Projects - 1,049,994 - Total - Governmental Capital Projects 18,654,703 80,670,510 25,723,659 -68.1% Total - Governmental Activities 103,230,468 191,806,950 102,930,221 -46.3% Water Utility 5,603,536 6,292,589 5,915,667 Sewer Utility 5,214,217 5,729,109 5,424,914 Airport 350,678 335,411 335,651 Landfill/Garbage 7,224,609 7,737,025 7,832,589 Transit 0 0 5,979,400 Cable TV, Internet & Telephone 658,492 711,708 717,476 Housing Authority 7,304,023 7,615,102 7,279,101 Storm Water Utility 715,969 736,808 731,702 Other Business Type 3,007,144 3,864,334 3,250,859 Enterprise Debt Service 25,836,902 9,231,789 9,313,719 Enterprise Capital Projects 13,922,889 49,612,700 20,222,673 Total - Business-Type Expenditures 69,838,459 91,866,575 67,003,751 -27.1% Total - All Expenditures 173,068,927 283,673,525 169,933,972 -40.1% Total - Transfers Out 46,972,625 96,551,554 54,738,103 -43.3% Total Expenditures & Transfers Out:220,041,552 380,225,079 224,672,075 -40.9% Business-Type Activities City of Iowa City - All Funds Total Expenditures & Transfers Out By State Program Area - ALL FUNDS - - 20 - - 21 - 1 Library Board City of Iowa City Administration of the Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC) is provided by Planning and Community Development Staff. Citizens City Council Advisory Boards & Commissions Airport Commission Library City Manager Airport City Clerk City Attorney Senior Center Human Resources Finance Parks & Recreation Planning & Comm. Develop. Public Works Human Rights Police Fire Transport. Services Broadband Telecom. MPO of Johnson County* Iowa City Housing Authority Housing & Inspection Services - 22 - CITY OF IOWA CITY STRATEGIC PLAN Background & Summary of Council Priorities from the Action P June 2012 Progress Report F Y 2 0 1 3     City of Iowa City Strategic Plan Background: During the spring of 2011, the City of Iowa City initiated a strategic planning process that included input from various stakeholders in the community. This included a community survey, conducted by the Thomas Group, which sought input from the public on community priorities and services. Iowa City then contracted with the University of Iowa’s Institute of Public Affairs (IPA) for facilitation services related to the FY 2012-13 Strategic Plan. The strategic planning process involved multiple steps, including gathering input from the general public, front-line city staff, department directors and the City Council. The process was completed with two City Council work sessions taking place on November 29th and December 5th of 2011. The strategic planning process focused on the following areas:  Issues, Concerns, Trends and Opportunities  On-Going or Committed Projects  Significant and New Projects, Programs, Policies and Initiatives  Organizational Effectiveness The FY 2012-13 Strategic Plan is an outline illustrating the primary areas of focus in the current year. Numerous additional projects, initiatives and policy matters that are not mentioned in this document will be carried out or addressed throughout the year as appropriate. The priorities in the FY 2012-13 Strategic Plan are intended to be fluid and may change over time as determined appropriate by the City Council. Established Priorities: The FY 2012-13 Strategic Plan established a prevailing organizational focus as the following: 1. Economic and Community Development 2. Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas 3. Neighborhood Stabilization 4. A Strong and Sustainable Financial Foundation 5. Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation In addition to acknowledging numerous on-going or committed projects (See Capital Improvements Program, June 2012 Status Report), the City Council identified the following new projects and initiatives that fall within the above-mentioned focus areas: - 23 -        Actively work with the Iowa City Community School District (ICCSD) on a joint strategy to maintain and build upon the success of schools in established neighborhoods while ensuring new elementary schools are planned as integral and sustainable components of neighborhoods (Neighborhood Stabilization)  Develop an economic development strategy for targeted commercial properties outside of the previously noted downtown and near downtown districts (Economic and Community Development)  Conduct a comprehensive organizational assessment focusing on communication strategies and the organizational customer service culture (Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation) The City Council also discussed a number of topics related to organizational effectiveness. Many of these issues will be fully examined through the above- mentioned organizational assessment. City Council also directed staff to undertake a succession planning process and become more strategic and engaged in working with state and federal government representatives. June, 2012 Status Report: The City Manager’s office is coordinating various actions that contribute to successful outcomes in each of the identified focus areas. The June, 2012 Status Report explains each of the following issue areas, names a primary staff contact, defines the anticipated steps needed to achieve the desired outcomes, and presents a timeline for completion of specifically outlined projects. The report also includes pertinent activities or projects identified by staff that Council may wish to consider in future budget processes. Following is a summary of priorities, specific goals and actions, and staff progress to date. Additional sections of the June 2012 report are incorporated throughout this budget document, where appropriate. - 24 -           Council Priorities Goal Defined Actions Progress to Date Economic and Community Development The City strives to expand and diversify the economic base of the community, particularly in existing planned commercial and industrial areas that have established supporting infrastructure. ‐ Move forward with capital investment and other targeted strategies for existing commercial locations in the community. ‐ Work to streamline the economic development process. ‐ Identify policies, programs and other activities that can assist economic development efforts community-wide. Strategies for the identified targeted areas have proceeded and include such steps as land acquisition, traffic studies and environmental reviews Several tangible steps have been taken to streamline development and businesses processes Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas It is the City’s goal to promote growth of the Downtown and Near Downtown areas in a manner that builds upon the existing vibrancy of the region, serves persons of all ages and backgrounds, and compliments the surrounding neighborhoods and University community. ‐ Commence work on planned capital projects, including a new parking facility, the conversion of Washington Street to two-way traffic and the Downtown maintenance project. ‐ Facilitate private investment through partnerships on strategic properties. ‐ Investigate new programs aimed to increase the marketability of existing properties and also increase the amount of usable space within the district's building stock. The Washington Street two-way conversion was completed and staff is working to prepare for the CDB streetscape improvements. Several investments in small businesses have been made. Several larger public/private partnerships have been announced or are being actively discussed. Staff is actively engaged with the Iowa City Downtown District and working on a number of promising issues with that group and the University. FY 2012-13 Strategic Planning Status Report: Summary of Council Priorities - 25 -          Council Priorities Goal Defined Actions Progress to Date Neighborhood Stabilization The City aims to invest in and deliver core services to neighborhoods in a manner that enhances overall stability and maintains the intended character while facilitating new opportunities to improve the quality of life. ‐ Analyze programs, policies and investment decisions in the following areas:  Land use regulations,  Public infrastructure and open space,  Private building stock,  Open stakeholder communication,  Updated planning documents, Nuisance mitigation ‐ Actively work with the ICCSD on collaborative efforts to strengthen neighborhood schools Council adopted several zoning code modifications and staff is researching future changes that will help create a healthy diversity of housing in neighborhoods. Staff has implemented and is working on various nuisance mitigation strategies. Investment in the private building stock continues through programs such as UniverCity. Several key stakeholder groups have been engaged and will help shape future progress toward this priority. A Strong and Sustainable Financial Foundation The City aims to create a strong and sustainable financial foundation that will provide needed stability and flexibility while utilizing taxpayer dollars in the most efficient and responsible manner. ‐ Review and recommend changes to financial policies and practices ‐ Maintain City’s AAA Bond Rating ‐ Continue to update and improve the analysis within and the readability of the annual budget document ‐ Earn the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award New policies have been adopted, including a new purchasing manual. The City also had its AAA bond rating reaffirmed. The City Council approved staffing changes, which allowed for greater resources to focus on financial analysis and the budget document. FY 2012-13 Strategic Planning Status Report: Summary of Council Priorities - 26 -       Council Priorities Goal Defined Actions Progress to Date Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation The City strives to be a high- functioning, customer service orientated organization that actively supports and engages stakeholders through clear, open and innovative communication methods. Conduct a comprehensive organizational assessment focusing on internal and external communication, as well as overall customer service. Council approved a reorganization plan that takes effect in July of 2013. This will result in an official communication strategy for the City and a greater focus on customer service improvements in all aspects of the organization. Organizational Effectiveness The City shall proactively look toward the future to ensure that services are continually able to be delivered at high levels and that relationships with external stakeholders are strong and productive. ‐ Complete a 5 year succession plan ‐ Enhance working relationships with State and Federal representatives ‐ Secure state and federal funding for local projects Staff is currently developing the five year succession plan with completion targeted for the fall or winter of 2012 Council has engaged the lobbying services of Davis Brown and is actively working with our partners at the Metro Coalition and Iowa League of Cities on State legislative issues. FY 2012-13 Strategic Planning Status Report: Summary of Council Priorities - 27 -   FY 2012‐13 City Council Strategic Plan      Priority:    Economic and Community Development    Staff Contact:  Jeff Davidson, Director of Planning and Community Development    Goal: The City strives to expand and diversify the economic base of the community,  particularly in existing planned commercial and industrial areas that have  established supporting infrastructure.      Action Plan:     The City Council has indicated a strong desire to promote private investment in established commercial  areas and strategic green‐field sites that have previously been targeted for new development.  The areas  that will be focused on in the coming year include, but are not limited to:     Towncrest   Sycamore Mall and First Avenue    Highway 6 / Highway 1    420th Street Industrial Park   Moss Green and Northgate     Each of these areas have different needs and varied market potentials. In the coming year staff will be  focusing on specific projects in each of these locations. Additionally, staff will be looking at more  generalized strategies that could help facilitate economic development investments throughout the  community.     Towncrest    This area has been the focus of planning efforts over the last several years. In the coming year, staff will  work to facilitate redevelopment of several key properties and also begin work on a streetscape project  that will improve the function and aesthetic of the area. These initial projects are intended to serve as a  catalyst for future investment in this business corridor.       Sycamore Mall and First Avenue     With the pending departure of Von Maur, staff is actively working with the private owners of the  Sycamore Mall on a new strategy for the property. The loss of the anchor tenant presents a great  challenge, but also a unique opportunity to reinvent the commercial space.  Staff has been encouraged  after some initial conversations with the property owners and will certainly work closely with the  owners in the next several months. Staff is also preparing for several significant capital projects in this  retail corridor. These street improvement projects will aim to promote better traffic flow in this often  congested region.         - 28 -   Highway 6/ Highway 1    This area remains a viable commercial corridor, in large part because of the high traffic counts.  One of  the primary efforts that staff will be focusing in the coming months is a plan for the City‐owned Public  Works and Transit property. As the City transitions its municipal operations to the S. Gilbert Street  location, new prime development space will become marketable. Staff is currently working on  environmental reviews and is planning to prepare a draft RFP for the property in late 2012. The City still  has operations on the site, and as a result any development will likely need to be phased in until such  time that all operations can be relocated. During the budget preparation process for FY 2014, staff will  be looking at options to expedite the transfer of all operations to the S. Gilbert Street campus.     420th Street Industrial Park    The City has invested considerable money in infrastructure development and recently achieved a shovel  ready status designation for prospective industrial enterprises. In the coming year, the public capital  projects should be substantially completed. ICAD and City staff continues to receive inquiries about the  property. It is expected that interest will continue to grow as the economy rebounds and capital projects  are completed.  As inquiries about the property increase, staff will be assisting ICAD with the necessary  evaluations.     Moss Urban Village and Northgate     The Moss Urban Village area is one with great potential due to its location off of I‐80. However, there  are significant infrastructure improvements that are necessary to accommodate the planned growth.  Staff is actively working with Pearson and the Moss Urban Village owners on potential access  arrangements that could allow for a phased development approach to this property. The Northgate  corporate park is continuing to experience build out. Staff will be working with that property owner to  assist with prospective businesses.       In addition to the more location specific actions listed above, staff will be focusing on broader polices  and projects that can influence economic development throughout the community. Examples of such  efforts will include:     Closer collaboration with ICAD, including helping launch their planned co‐working project in  Iowa City   Investigation of additional co‐working projects with private or non‐profit entities   Review of CDBG programs and policies that facilitate economic development activity   Continued analysis of zoning classifications and provisions, as well as other policies that may be  unnecessarily restricting specific development projects    Analysis of potential future capital investments that could facilitate private investment   Streamlining of the internal economic development and business operation processes within the  City   Investigating the cost/benefit of a retail analysis and recruitment consultant    Creating a healthy economic development environment through appropriate land use policies, incentive  programs, stakeholder relationships and strategic capital investments is a continuing priority for City  - 29 -   staff. Focus on these broader economic development issues will help maximize the private investment  that results from the more targeted strategies in the specific areas that Council has identified with this  goal.     Progress to Date:    In 2011 the Council adopted a new set of economic development policies that are helping to guide  decisions pertaining to public incentives. These policies are serving as a valuable standard for staff and  elected officials. Staff will continue to evaluate the effectiveness of these policies and recommend any  changes as necessary in the future. Staff is also evaluating the cost and benefits associated with a retail  recruitment consultant. Many cities contract for such services in an effort to boost regional and national  exposure of local commercial properties. This evaluation is ongoing and will be reviewed with Council at  a future date.    Towncrest    This spring witnessed the completion of the free medical clinic building façade project. This project  illustrates the type of redevelopment that can be expected in the district. Additionally, staff finalized the  acquisition of the Kerr‐McGee property on First Avenue and Muscatine. Staff intends to market this  property for redevelopment. Further discussions on a new medical office building and a streetscape  project in the district are progressing and staff is optimistic that these projects will materialize in the  coming months.     Sycamore Mall and First Avenue     Staff continues to have regular discussions with the Sycamore Mall ownership team and the new  General Manager. The mall is working on plans for physical improvements to the property and staff  expects to receive a plan in the summer of 2012.  City staff members are currently planning some  landscaping improvements to the vegetation between Highway 6 and the Sycamore Mall. These  improvements will enhance the visibility and provide a more aesthetically welcoming appearance to the  property. Other areas of focus for the mall management team appear to be improvements to the  property signage, an interior common space remodel and additional special events. In June, the City  Council will be considering a CDBG small business loan for Title Boxing, which plans to locate in a vacant  space within the mall.    Staff is also coordinating four significant capital projects in the area that are expected to last two or  more constructions seasons. Those include improvements to Sycamore and Lower Muscatine roads, as  well as the grade separation project on First Avenue and the State’s repaving of Highway 6. These  projects will each have a positive impact on the traffic flows in this commercial district.     Highway 6/ Highway 1    Much of staff’s focus on this corridor has been on the publicly owned land located at the southeast  corner of Highway 6 and Riverside Drive.  A phase one environmental study has been completed and a  phase two study is in‐progress.  Once the extent of any environmental concerns is known, the City will  initiate remediation actions or will issue an RFP for potential development. The site still houses  municipal facilities. Staff is exploring options for expediting relocation plans for those operations. The  eventual development may likely need to be phased, depending on the timing of such relocations.   - 30 -   Moss Urban Village and Northgate     Staff continues to work with the property owners of Moss Urban Village as they push forward with  developing their prime real estate. Access to the property remains the most critical issue, as the cost of  connecting Oakdale Boulevard from the west is too prohibitive at this time. As a result, the City has  partnered with the property owner on a traffic study that contemplates alternative access  arrangements. That study is being reviewed by the property owners, the City and Pearson, as the  alternatives would likely involve use of their property. Once access issues are better defined, staff  expects that development discussions will resume.     Staff continues to work with the Northgate property owners and ICAD on attracting new business to the  Northgate business park. There remains interest in the developable property and staff is optimistic that  some new projects will commence in coming year. Also in Northgate the Council recently approved use  of Midwestern Disaster Area Revenue Bonds for an Iowa City Cancer Treatment Center facility.     420th Street Industrial Park    In May of 2012, the City Council approved a bid award for the rail spur project in the industrial Park. This  project, which was funded in part by a State grant, will help increase the marketability of this property.  Also in that same month, the Council received the official shovel ready designation for this property  from the State of Iowa. This designation will help elevate the marketability of the property and will  increase its exposure to companies working with State economic development officials. Both City staff  and ICAD representatives continue to market the property and respond to inquiries from businesses and  site location consultants.     Other Location Specific Projects    The City is actively working to enhance the marketability of the Downtown and Riverfront Crossings  areas. These efforts are detailed in the Downtown strategic plan objective that follows.     Additionally, the City Council partnered with the State on an incentive package to assist with the  expansion of ALPLA, a global bottling company that has a growing operation in Iowa City. The City  should receive confirmation in the coming months as to whether ALPLA will make that investment in its  Iowa City plant.     The City recently agreed to vacate right‐of‐way to the University of Iowa. This vacation will facilitate a  parking lot development that will allow for a substantial investment in the medical campus, including a  new tower that will serve as the Children’s Hospital. This campus expansion will have a significant  economic impact on the local economy.     On a smaller scale, the City funded two small business startups through the CDBG micro‐enterprise  program. Those projects include the Trumpet Blossom Café and Molly’s Cupcakes. A third small business  loan for Title Boxing is pending Council approval. The City also used discretionary economic  development funds to seed the Busy Co‐Working startup, which is now open in downtown Iowa City.   The City is hoping that this venture will expose entrepreneurs to business resources and contacts  needed to grow their ideas in the Iowa City community.      - 31 -   Other Economic Development Efforts    In addition to location specific investments, staff is working on various other initiatives aimed at  assisting economic development efforts and streamlining other processes impacting businesses in the  community. In April, the Council adopted code changes pertaining to the redevelopment of non‐ conforming properties. These changes will make it less onerous to redevelop or improve such sites in  the community. The Council also broadened sidewalk café standards and gave staff the administrative  authority to approve such uses. This will allow for a turnaround period in a matter of days as opposed to  a couple of weeks. Lastly, staff has initiated a review of the City’s commercial zoning classifications. In  conducting this review staff has invited members of the business community to the table for their  insight and input. Changes stemming from this review will be presented to Council at a later date.     In an effort to better accommodate the business community, staff has initiated a pilot program focusing  on our development intake process. One criticism of the City has been that it is too time consuming to  coordinate discussions with all the departments and that some issues or additional legislative  requirements are not identified upfront, thus leading to the expenditure of additional time and money  and delays in the project approval process. In order to mitigate these occurrences, staff is piloting a ‘one  stop shop’ approach to our intake. A cross‐departmental team is now available to meet with prospective  developers each week. During these meetings all impacted departments are available to provide initial  comments, raise red flags, and make suggestions. At these meetings, staff can also spell out the  legislative timeline and expected fees. The initial feedback on this approach has been very positive and  thus staff will continue to refine this process in the coming year.    The City Council adopted a buy local policy in April of 2012. This policy will encourage more local  business and will foster greater business relationships with those entities in Johnson County. Along with  this policy change, the new procurement regulations simplified the business climate for vendors and  service providers interested in doing business with the City.     With the completion of the fourth fire station, the Fire Department has initiated the process for  updating the City’s current Insurance Services Office (ISO) fire protection rating of Class 3. This review  took place in May and the City is currently awaiting results. An improvement in the rating to a Class 2  could positively impact property insurance rates for some commercial and industrial business owners. If  an upgraded ISO rating is achieved, some of the potential cost savings for businesses will be realized at  the same time as the City’s property tax rate will drop $.57.  This property tax reduction for FY 13 was  the largest among the Metro Coalition cities. Staff will continue to explore ways to further reduce the  City’s tax rate, while maintaining valued public services in the coming years.      Future Budget Considerations:    A number of the programs and investment decisions that staff will be analyzing will require budgetary  support. At this time there are no specific recommendations that will require a budget adjustment or  future allocation of funds. Any future recommendations that have a budgetary impact will be detailed in  specific action items or in the FY 14 budget proposal to Council.             - 32 -   FY 2012‐13 City Council Strategic Plan      Priority:    Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas    Staff Contact:  Jeff Davidson, Director of Planning and Community Development    Goal: It is the City’s goal to promote growth of the Downtown and Near Downtown  areas in a manner that builds upon the existing vibrancy of the region, serves  persons of all ages and backgrounds, and complements the surrounding  neighborhoods and University community.      Action Plan:     Staff will be focusing on three distinct geographic areas including Downtown Iowa City, the Northside  Marketplace and Riverfront Crossings. Each of these areas requires individual, yet coordinated,  development strategies. In the coming year staff will work to build on the policies and projects that the  City has recently undertaken in a manner that will leverage further private investment in these core  central areas of the community.     Downtown Iowa City    The successful formation of the SSMID presents a unique opportunity to bring together property  owners, businesses, the University of Iowa and Iowa City. With a better coordinated vision and  additional resources from all stakeholders, there will be opportunities for desired progress. City staff will  remain integrally involved with the SSMID and will offer needed support throughout this first year and  beyond.  In conjunction with the SSMID, the City will be actively looking for ways to build upon the  success of special events that successfully bring visitors to the Downtown. Festivals and other special  events are a critical component to the success of the area and there needs to be a continual effort to  improve and expand the scope of such activities.     In 2007 and 2011, the City partnered on two separate market analyses related to Downtown Iowa City.  The Marketek and Divaris studies both highlighted the market potential for the area. It is now  incumbent upon staff, in partnership with our stakeholders, to pursue policies and projects that will help  more fully realize the potential of the central business district.     Staff is currently preparing for two significant capital projects that will directly impact the Downtown  region. The conversion of Washington Street from one‐way to two‐way traffic will improve vehicular and  pedestrian traffic flow and advance the marketability of this important retail corridor. The downtown  maintenance project will improve the physical condition of the infrastructure and streetscape. Staff will  be working closely with the SSMID to prioritize potential projects with an eye toward making the area  more attractive and inviting for patrons. Additionally, staff will evaluate other potential public  improvement projects for the region that may be included in future budget proposals to the City  Council.     There are a number of existing projects that are in various stages of development that will have a  positive impact on downtown. The University’s announcement of the Voxman‐Clapp building location at  - 33 -   the corner of Clinton and Burlington is tremendously positive. That project will require careful  coordination between the City and University on infrastructure improvements and traffic management.  Staff is currently preparing to market the 'John Wilson building' property on the eastern edge of the  Downtown. This property has great potential to attract significant private investment and add to the  vibrancy of the entire district. ICAD’s effort to establish a co‐working space in Downtown as well as the  ongoing renovation of the former Vito’s space will help to infuse new activity in the coming year. The  recent fire at the Bruegger's and Van Patten House properties also presents unique redevelopment  opportunities. Staff will be working to assist in the successful completion of these projects, as well as  several other potential downtown projects that are currently being contemplated by various property  owners and developers.     Lastly, staff will be investigating ways to facilitate new private investment in the area. Among the items  that staff will be looking at include land use policies and regulations, as well as potential new grant  and/or loan programs to assist in the rehabilitation of exterior and/or interior spaces of existing  buildings. Such programs would aim to increase the marketability of properties and also increase the  amount of usable space within the district's existing building stock.      Riverfront Crossings    The Riverfront Crossing area, located immediately south of Downtown, is intended to serve as a  pedestrian orientated mixed‐use neighborhood. Extensive planning for this area has been undertaken.  Staff is working with consultants on zoning code changes that will be necessary to achieve the  established vision for that area. Such changes will be presented to the Council in the coming months.  Earlier this year, Council created a new Urban Renewal Area for the Riverside Drive area, which anchors  the western edge of the district. Staff also expects to recommend that Council expand the City /  University urban renewal area south to encompass a greater portion of the Riverfront Crossings area.    Several critical capital projects are currently underway in the Riverfront Crossing area. The multi‐use  parking facility with an accompanying mixed‐use development, as well as the decommissioning of the  north wastewater plant will both help facilitate future private investment in the region. Additionally,  staff continues to advocate for a passenger rail connection to Chicago with an eventual station location  in the Riverfront Crossings area. Establishing rail service would be an incredible boost to the community  and would directly impact the marketability of the Riverfront Crossings area.     In the coming year staff will focus on finishing the planning, regulatory and financial incentive policies as  well as commencing work on the initial capital projects. These actions will help lay the groundwork for  future private investment. Additionally, staff will focus on private projects already in some stage of  development, such as the anticipated Riverside Drive hotel project. Evaluation of future public capital  projects that could help speed the development of the area will be considered with the FY 2013‐14  budget submittal to Council.     Northside Marketplace    This area recently benefited from streetscape improvements that advanced the aesthetics and improved  pedestrian and bicycle accommodations. This area will be included in many of the staff analyses that are  described in the neighborhood stabilization goal. Similarly, the efforts to investigate ways to facilitate  new private investment that were described in the Downtown section of this goal will be broad enough  - 34 -   to encompass the Northside Marketplace.  Other potential public investments will be considered for the  FY 2014 budget.      Progress to Date:    Downtown and Northside Marketplace    Staff has been actively participating with the SSMID board and various subcommittees. The group is  currently recruiting an Executive Director. While that process is wrapping up, staff is actively engaged in  a number of critical conversations about the district.  Examples of such topics being discussed include  parking policies, taxi stands, sign regulations, and maintenance practices. Staff expects that these  conversations will lead to policy and/or project recommendations that will be forwarded to Council later  in 2012.      Of particular note, the SSMID board and staff have agreed that it would be prudent for the City to  contract with an urban design team before making a several hundred thousand dollar investment in  maintenance projects in the Central Business District. The design team could review the 1998  streetscape plan and suggest modernizations that will meet the changing needs of patrons and also  more definitely tie the downtown to the Northside Marketplace, River front Crossings and the University  property. Staff and the SSMID group are currently discussing the appropriate steps to take for this  initiative.    The SSMID group has initiated their first special event / public art project, called BenchMarks. This  project involves the painting of over 100 public benches in the Central Business District. The pilot  program was completed in May and additional benches will be painted throughout the summer in  conjunction with festivals and other public gatherings.  The program is expected to continue in  subsequent years.  2012 also ushered in the inaugural One Book Two Book festival, which was very  successful and showed great promise as an annual event showcasing the library and Downtown Iowa  City. Lastly, the SSMID group and the City worked to facilitate the very successful Asics Fan Fest that  welcomed thousands of wrestling fans from across the country in conjunction with the Olympic  Wrestling Trials.     Earlier this year, the City completed the Washington Street two‐way conversion project.  The public has  responded very well to this project and there has been no significant challenges post conversion.  Additionally, Council approved new sidewalk cafe standards including allowing for administrative  approvals to expedite business operations. An ordinance change allowing for greater density in  exchange for Class A office space was also approved by Council.     There are several individual projects that are at different phases at the current time. Staff is working to  make certain that the following projects remain active:     Rehabilitation of the former Vito’s building continues and a new office tenant has been secured  for the second story space. Staff is optimistic a first floor tenant will be announced in the coming  months.   The Park at 201 is the name of the new high rise building at the Wells Fargo site, which was  approved by Council in April. Work has commenced on the site and construction is expected to  be completed in 2013.   Numerous small business investments have been made in the past few months including:  - 35 -   o Busy Co‐working  o Trumpet Blossom Cafe  o Molly's Cupcakes   Council has authorized funding for the ICAD Co‐Lab and staff is working with the ICAD board to  finalize the business plan for this venture.    Staff is preparing the 'John Wilson building' RFP, which will be released after the environmental  testing activities are completed.   A committee comprised of staff and Council members is currently reviewing proposals for the  multi‐use parking facility building at the former St. Pat's property.   Staff is actively working with the owners of the two downtown properties that were damaged  by a fire last fall. The Bruegger’s corporation is currently in the process of securing City permits  for their new building.    Staff is currently assisting with a rezoning application and associated special exception for the  Sabin property repurposing. If approved, this action will facilitate a drive‐thru banking facility  and ultimately the University’s Voxman‐Clapp project.    Riverfront Crossings    Riverfront Crossings is in its early planning stages, however a number of significant happenings are  occurring in 2012. The City Council recently approved an expansion of the south waste water plant,  which will lead to the decommissioning of north plant. This will free up valuable space that will serve as  an anchor for the district.     Council recently created a new Urban Renewal Area on the western edge of the district covering the  Riverside Drive area, immediately west of the river. This financial incentive tool could be used to spur  redevelopment. Demolition has already occurred on the site that will become home to a new hotel in  2013. This project is being initiated with public financial assistance.      In the coming months, staff expects to bring before Council an expansion of the City / University Urban  Renewal Area. Also expected is a new form based zoning code that will help spur the desired mixed use  development in the region.    Future Budget Considerations:    None at this time.                            - 36 -   FY 2012‐13 City Council Strategic Plan      Priority:    Neighborhood Stabilization    Staff Contact:  Jeff Davidson, Director of Planning and Community Development     Geoff Fruin, Assistant to the City Manager    Goal: The City aims to invest in and deliver core services to neighborhoods in a  manner that enhances overall stability and maintains the intended character  while facilitating new opportunities to improve the quality of life.      Action Plan:    The Council has indicated a strong desire to stabilize the neighborhoods surrounding the city core. An  effective stabilization strategy requires a review and analysis of the City's policies, programs,  communications and capital investment decisions that directly shape and influence a neighborhood's  character and livelihood. Such a strategy should recognize the importance of maintaining a  neighborhood's character while also creating an environment that facilitates complementary  development opportunities.     In the coming year staff will focus on the central planning district neighborhoods, however many aspects  of the neighborhood stabilization review will have implications throughout the community.  In order to  achieve Council's goal, staff will be focusing on the elements illustrated by the following radial diagram  that influence strong neighborhoods:      Neighborhood  Stabilization Land Use  Regulations Public  Infrastructure  and Open Space Private Building  Stock Nuisance  Mitigation Open  Stakeholder  Communication  Updated  Planning  Documents - 37 -     Land Use Regulations    Land use policies directly influence the manner in which neighborhoods develop. Therefore it is  critical that staff analyze the policies and code provisions that govern land use in the  neighborhoods that Council seeks to stabilize. Throughout the year staff will be reviewing  various aspects of land use regulations, including but not limited to:    o Appropriate densities provided by zoning classifications  o Permitted uses within the zoning classifications  o Permitted number of unrelated habitants per unit  o Permitted number/mix of bedrooms per unit/structure  o Parking requirements  o Open space requirements  o Appropriateness of additional historic or conservation districts  o Potential density bonuses for desirable development characteristics and/or targeted  locations  o Land assembly and subdivision policies  o Demolition permit requirements  o Security plan requirements    Public Infrastructure and Open Space    Public infrastructure and open space plays a critical role in neighborhoods. Well maintained and  appropriately planned infrastructure and open space can directly influence a neighborhood's  character and can further attract private investment that sustains neighborhoods over the long‐ term. Over the next year staff will be evaluating the adequacy of planned public investments in  the following areas:    o Street maintenance (including concrete and brick)  o Utilities  o Sidewalks  o Alleys  o Signage and pavement markings  o Traffic calming provisions  o Street trees and plantings  o Parkland amenities  o Recreational trails    Private Building Stock    Facilitating private investment in the existing building stock can reinvigorate neighborhoods  while reducing undesirable redevelopment pressures or the spread of blighted conditions. The  city has several programs that aim to encourage investment in the residential building stock of  neighborhoods. Those include:    o UniverCity  o General Rehabilitation Improvement Program (GRIP)  - 38 -   o Housing Authority down payment assistance program      Staff will be evaluating the effectiveness of these programs, as well as their funding levels to   ensure they are having the intended impact in the core neighborhoods. In addition, staff will be   researching other programs that aim to accomplish increased investment in the private building   stock, including residential improvement districts and single‐family infill programs.     Nuisance Mitigation    Stable neighborhoods benefit from actions that effectively reduce or eliminate habitual sources  of nuisances and quickly address incidents creating sporadic nuisances. Effective nuisance  mitigation strategies can improve the livability of neighborhoods and remove barriers to desired  private investment. In reviewing our nuisance mitigation strategy in the core neighborhoods  staff will consider the following:    o Policies or programs that reduce the number of non‐conforming uses and rooming  houses   Amortization of non‐conforming uses   Nuisance ordinances that can trigger the loss of non‐conforming status   Creation of a City “non‐conforming use buyout program” to strategically reduce  such uses in critical areas of neighborhoods  o Requirement that duplexes are ‘leased as licensed’  o Evaluation of the existing effectiveness of the rental permit sanction provision of the  code  o Review of Police Department policies on enforcement of disorderly house and other  criminal laws in neighborhoods  o Review of the existing trash, debris and litter ordinance  o Review trash receptacle standards (residential container storage and commercial  dumpsters)  o Active participation on the Partnership for Alcohol Safety (PAS) taskforce  o Exploration of further potential collaboration with the University of Iowa    Open Stakeholder Communication    Any effective neighborhood stabilization strategy must include open dialogue and exchanges of  ideas with stakeholder groups. Staff believes it will be essential to involve both neighborhood  representatives and members of the development community in future neighborhood  stabilization discussions. Additionally, it may be appropriate to conduct more comprehensive  stakeholder surveys.      Similarly, staff will be evaluating mechanisms that can more effectively solicit stakeholder  feedback on a continual basis. This includes evaluation of the optional "Good Neighbor Policy",  as well enhanced electronic communication channels through website improvements and/or  smartphone applications.     Neighborhood schools also have a role in neighborhood stabilization efforts. Thus  communicating and actively working with the ICCSD will be an important part of the overall  - 39 -   stabilization strategy. Staff will be seeking to establish two‐way communication mechanisms  with the ICCSD that promote increased coordination in school and neighborhood planning.    Finally, the City needs to make sure that it reaches out to the University, which has a keen  interest in making sure that neighborhoods adequately support students, faculty and staff.  Strong neighborhoods and well‐planned communities can be strong assets for the University  and support its efforts to recruit a high‐quality student body and workforce to the area.   Updated Planning Documents    Ultimately, the success of neighborhoods also depends on well‐conceived planning documents  that guide staff and elected officials in future decisions. To this end, staff has initiated processes  that will seek public input on the City’s Comprehensive Plan. Furthermore, staff is reviewing  neighborhood scale plans in other communities that may be appropriate to initiate in select  Iowa City neighborhoods.      Progress to Date:    Land Use Regulations    In April and May of 2012, the City Council passed three significant zoning changes that aimed to more  effectively regulate multi‐family developments particularly around the off‐campus housing area. Those  three ordinances included:     Amending the definition of a household to include no more than three unrelated persons in all  zoning classifications   Creating a graduated density formula for the development of one, two and three bedroom  apartments in select zoning classifications   Increasing the parking requirement for three bedroom units in a newly defined University  Impact Area    These changes will have a profound impact on future development, most notably in those areas close to  downtown and the university campus where a diversity of housing stock is desired to achieve vibrant  neighborhoods.     Staff is currently researching further changes, including the identification of areas where increased  density or a private dormitory concept may be appropriate. Simultaneously, staff is reviewing existing  zoning provisions to ensure that the various provisions are having the intended consequences on  development and our neighborhoods.    Public Infrastructure and Open Space    Most of staff’s efforts in this area will be focused in the development of the Capital Improvements  Program budget for FY 14. When developing recommendations, staff will focus on capital improvements  that enhance and strengthen our neighborhoods. Examples of recently completed or scheduled projects  that accomplish this objective would be the North Market Square Park rehabilitation and the planned  brick street replacement on Dewey.    - 40 -   There is currently a public hearing set in June of 2012 for the repurposing of CDBG funds for a  Fairmeadows Park (2500 Miami Drive) improvement project. Staff identified this park in the southeast  part of town as a good candidate for a splash pad, which will boost the park’s appeal to children, young  adults and families. Staff will continue to explore other similar opportunities throughout the year.    Private Building Stock    Although State grant funds are no longer available for the UniverCity program, Council has authorized  funding that will help sustain the program in FY13. In FY12 the program has renovated and sold 14  houses. By the end of the fiscal year, staff expects that 7 additional houses will have closed or have  signed purchase agreements. It is estimated that another four houses will be completed under this  program in FY13. Feedback from this program has been overwhelmingly positive, with many neighbors  crediting it with stabilizing their neighborhoods and spurring additional private investment. Staff will  explore funding sources that can help sustain this widely popular and successful program in the years  ahead.      Staff also continues to implement its more traditional rehabilitation program, General Rehabilitation  Improvement Program (GRIP). To date in FY12 the program rehabilitated 11 homes and has committed  funds for another 10 homes.  The investment in these properties totals approximately $380,000.  This  program invests in the private building stock and helps preserve structures for owner‐occupied  habitants.      As part of the Council approved annual CDBG Action Plan, staff will begin a new program for FY 13 that  will provide a combination of low and no interest loans and forgivable loans to homeowners to make  exterior, emergency and comprehensive repairs to their homes in targeted areas of Iowa City. These  areas include the UniverCity program boundaries, the Towncrest area and the Grant Wood area. 50% of  each loan will be forgiven if the home is maintained as the owner’s primary residence for 5 years or 10  years after the project is complete. The rehabilitation projects will be exterior and emergency repairs  with a $10,000 maximum per project, funded through CDBG funds. Comprehensive repairs will be made  with HOME funds, with $24,999 being the maximum project amount. HOME‐funded rehabilitation  projects require all code items and other safety issues be addressed on the interior and exterior  (including all fences or outbuildings). Any of the projects may also be supplemented with existing Iowa  City Housing Rehab funds when needed. The Housing and Community Development Commission  recommended $200,000 in funding for assistance with this new effort.     Staff has conducted some preliminary research on single‐family infill programs and residential  improvement districts. More research is needed on this subject before any recommendation can be  formulated.     Open Stakeholder Communication    Going forward, staff is making a concerted effort to engage a variety of stakeholders in these important  community discussions. In recent months staff has met with residents in the following neighborhoods:     College Hill   Northside   Goosetown   Glendale  - 41 -    Miller‐Orchard   Parkview Terrace    The recent public discussions on diversity and the City’s changing demographics have led to creation of  an ad‐hoc committee. This committee will likely discuss issues concerning the stability of our  neighborhoods. It will be important that the City fully engages in these discussions and examines  outcomes that will help strengthen specific neighborhoods and the larger community in general.     As additional regulatory changes are considered staff will meet with neighbors and also engage the  development community. The City Manager intends to continue his Developer Roundtable meeting and  staff had a productive meeting with the Home Builders Association on recent zoning changes that  should serve as a foundation for discussions on future issues pertaining to development.     Staff has also engaged the ICCSD in discussions pertaining to their future plans for both new and existing  facilities in the district. We hope to establish and build an open dialogue that will allow for greater  collaboration in the months and years ahead. Similarly, staff has reached out to the University to involve  them in future development issues that impact housing and neighborhoods that serve their students,  faculty and staff.      Nuisance Mitigation    To date, staff has been reviewing the effectiveness of current nuisance mitigation policies and practices.  There has been a particular focus on the rental permit sanction provisions in the code. Staff has  compiled statistics on the number of properties that have been subject to some phase of this process for  each year the ordinance has been in effect (2003 to present). Staff is continuing to review that  information and will determine if any changes should be recommended for adoption by the Council.     Staff is also increasing the use of a code provision that allows for annual property inspections (instead of  once every two years). The annual inspections can be triggered by nuisance and/or criminal complaints.  In cases where properties are generating violations, a more frequent inspection schedule can provide  incentive for property owners to take steps to limit nuisance violations.      Earlier this year, staff sent notice to owners of duplexes that those units must be leased to the public in  a manner consistent in which they are licensed by the City. Prior to this notice there were cases of entire  duplexes being leased to a single tenant or group of tenants. The clarification that staff made with these  property owners is that each unit in a duplex must be leased separately. Staff also updated the City’s  rental disclosure form in an effort to provide more clear information on existing regulations. This form is  required to be completed for all rental permits.     The City has also taken steps to increase over‐occupancy enforcement efforts. Staff is proactively  looking at rental advertisements and has also worked with University of Iowa officials to use their  student directory. By reviewing these sources staff can attempt to identify over‐occupancy situations  before any nuisances are generated.     Staff has had conversations with neighborhood groups about their experiences and top nuisance  concerns. Common themes in those discussions seem to be recurring problems with non‐conforming  properties and aesthetic concerns with trash, debris and related receptacles. Staff is reviewing current  policies in these areas and will consider potential methods to alleviate these concerns.  This may result  - 42 -   in ordinance modifications, which would come before Council for review at a later date. Staff is also in  the process of shifting internal resources to conduct more targeted trash and debris patrols. Such  patrols will be targeted to areas where complaints are most often received and will likely be conducted  at times when the problems seem to peak (e.g. following special events).      Finally, staff is investigating ways to enhance community reporting of nuisance violations. This includes  the development of a mobile application that would allow people to submit complaints with location  and picture capabilities via their mobile device.  This type of service would likely be rolled out at the  same time the City completes its website redesign.     Updated Planning Documents    Staff launched the “Good Ideas” campaign and held several public forums to solicit input on the City’s  Comprehensive Plan.  Comments received electronically as well as in the public forums are helping to  shape an update to this important planning document. Staff anticipates that an updated comprehensive  plan will be available for public review and Council approval in late summer or early fall of 2012.      Future Budget Considerations:    A number of the programs and investment decisions that staff will be analyzing will require budgetary  support. At this time there are no specific recommendations that will require a budget adjustment or  future allocation of funds. Any future recommendations that have a budgetary impact will be detailed in  subsequent reports or will be included in the FY 14 budget submittal to Council.                                                    - 43 -   FY 2012‐13 City Council Strategic Plan      Priority:    A Strong and Sustainable Financial Foundation    Staff Contact:  Kevin O’Malley, Finance Director    Goal: The City aims to create a strong and sustainable financial foundation that will  provide needed stability and flexibility while utilizing taxpayer dollars in the  most efficient and responsible manner.        Action Plan:     In order to achieve this Strategic Plan goal, the City is focusing in two primary areas. First, staff will be  recommending to Council several new financial policies that will provide a greater level of financial  stability. Secondly, staff will continue to enhance the level of financial analysis presented to the public  so that our elected officials will have a greater informational foundation on which to base future  decisions. This includes a continued emphasis to improve the Financial Plan document and ultimately  achieve the GFOA Distinguished Budget Presentation Award.     Staff has completed or is currently revising or creating the following financial policies:     Economic Development Policies   Purchasing Policies and Procedures   Target Fund Balances   Debt Service Coverage Levels   General Fund Contingency Level   Annual review of rates, user charges and fines    In addition to the above‐mentioned specific policies, staff is carefully examining our operations and  noting examples of the City providing subsidized service beyond our borders. In reviewing these  situations, staff will develop plans to ensure that the City is being equitably reimbursed for such  services.     The revised purchasing manual was adopted by the Council in the spring of 2012. The remaining items  will be incorporated into the presentation of the proposed Fiscal Year 2013‐14 budget document.     Throughout the year staff will be working to improve the financial analysis presented to the Council and  general public. Furthermore, staff is continuing efforts to make the annual financial plan more readable  and user friendly. Among the top priorities in this area include:     Refinement of individual department narratives, including performance and comparative  metrics   Introduction of a ten‐year financial trend analysis section in the Financial Plan   Expanded detail of line‐item expenditures in the budget document    - 44 -   Through enhanced information, greater transparency and well rooted financial policies, the City can  create a strong and sustainable financial foundation that will provide needed stability and flexibility  while utilizing taxpayer dollars in the most efficient and responsible manner.      Progress to Date:    In 2011, the Council adopted economic development policies that aim to guide decisions on financial  support of private projects.  These policies have been applied to numerous projects and appear to be  serving an effective purpose. The policies send a clear message to the private sector as to the type of  projects and level of support that the City is willing to consider. This helps frame discussions and focuses  the attention on projects that provide the desired outcomes for the community.    In April of 2012, the City Council adopted a new purchasing manual. This manual provided much needed  updates to all purchasing related policies. The new policies are intended to streamline the procurement  process while also ensuring that the most competitive pricing options are obtained. Additionally, the  manual created a local preference policy aimed at keeping more public dollars in the local economy.  Staff will closely monitor the effectiveness of the new policies and also solicit feedback from the local  business community. Any needed changes or adjustments will be brought back to Council for  consideration.     In May of 2012, Moody’s conducted a review of the City as part of the bond rating process. The review  resulted in Moody’s reaffirming the City’s AAA bond rating for the recently issued general obligation  bonds. The excellent bond rating led the City to securing the lowest interest rates on bonds in recent  memory. Iowa City remains as one of four Iowa cities with that highest rating. Nationally, less than 200  cities currently have a AAA Moody’s bond rating.     Also in May of 2012, the Council approved a shifting of personnel resources within the Finance  Department. That change resulted in the elimination of a three quarter time Purchasing Clerk position  and the addition of a second full‐time Budget Analyst position. This change will help facilitate progress  toward the specific items in this strategic plan goal.  Specifically, the second Budget Analyst position will  provide the ability to expand upon budget narratives, comparative analysis, financial trends and  performance measures. These efforts will enhance the effectiveness of the organization and also better  inform the general public and elected officials about the City’s overall fiscal performance.     Staff has requested that the Government Financial Officers Associations (GFOA) provide feedback on the  City’s recently adopted FY 13 budget. The comments received, as well as the initiatives already  underway in the Finance Department will help the City achieve the GFOA Distinguished Budget  Presentation Award in the future.     Lastly, staff continues to evaluate services that stretch beyond our borders. In these instances staff is  reviewing the level of subsidy and determining steps to ensure that in the future the City is equitably  reimbursed for such services.    Future Budget Considerations:    None at this time      - 45 -   FY 2012‐13 City Council Strategic Plan      Priority:    Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation    Staff Contact:  Geoff Fruin, Assistant to the City Manager    Goal: The City strives to be a high‐functioning, customer service orientated  organization that actively supports and engages stakeholders through clear,  open and innovative communication methods.      Action Plan:     The City Manager’s Office is conducting a comprehensive organizational assessment focusing on  communication strategies and the organizational customer service culture. The assessment is targeting  the following issue areas:    1. Communications  a. Internal  i. Review of interdepartmental communication methods  ii. Identification of barriers to effective internal communication (e.g. technology)  b. External  i. Assessment of clarity in City communication to various audiences   ii. Review of effectiveness of current communication methods (e.g. website,  advertisements, direct mail, etc.)  iii. Identification of emerging communication methods and barriers to effective  usage  iv. Initiate a website redesign process  v. Consider any needed changes to the branding of the City and/or activities,  amenities or services (e.g. use of logos)  2. Customer Service Orientation  a. Transactional Processes  i. identification of transaction‐orientated public services   ii. Assessment of process efficiency, accessibility, and convenience  iii. Barriers to efficiency (technology, information sharing, training, policies, etc.)   b. Organizational Culture  i. Assessment of policies and programs aimed to recognize and encourage  outstanding customer service  ii. Identification of mechanisms to facilitate and encourage ideas for customer  service enhancement  iii. Opportunities for skill enhancements, cross‐training and promotion of increased  awareness pertaining to other city services or programs  - 46 -     It is anticipated that the assessment will conclude with the development of an organizational  communication and customer service plan. That plan is expected to be ready for presentation to Council  in the late fall or winter of 2012‐13.     Progress to Date:    In April of 2012, the City Council approved a staff reorganization that will serve as the foundation of a  more centralized and strategic approach to organizational communication. That reorganization, which  becomes effective on July 1st, eliminates the Document Services division of the Finance Department and  moves the remaining two employees of that division into the City Manager’s office. Those two  employees will be joined by the City’s Web Developer to form a central communication team. With  guidance from the City Manager, the communication team will work with departments to develop well‐ coordinated public messaging.  The primary responsibility of the new communication team in the first  year will be to conduct an organizational assessment and develop a communication and customer  service plan for the City. The group will also lead an employee committee tasked with redesigning Iowa  City’s main website.     The new communication team will also assume oversight of the front desk responsibilities at City Hall  during regular business hours. Two part‐time employees will split desk coverage and offer front line  customer service assistance to visitors and those contacting City Hall via phone or email. Staff is also  preparing plans for an authorized remodel of the front lobby area. The redesign aims to create a more  welcoming environment for both City Hall and the Police Department. After plans are prepared they will  be reviewed with Council and then bid out for completion later in 2012.     Part of the organizational focus in the coming year will be to make sure staff has access to  communication related resources and training opportunities. To that end, the Personnel Division  arranged for communications training for City staff that took place in May.  Several staff members  participated in this effort. Similar opportunities will be evaluated throughout the year.      A significant barrier to internal communications lies in the City’s decentralized and dated computer  platform. Several years ago the City attempted to rectify this situation; however, the software vendor  failed to perform under the terms of the agreement. The City is currently reviewing additional software  proposals that would allow for a more centralized approach with information sharing advantages.  Such  a system will also facilitate the automating of several processes within the organization, and would  result in easier access to information and ultimately better informed decision‐making. Implementation  of such a system will likely need to be phased in over several years. Staff expects to bring Council a  formal recommendation on this matter in the summer of 2012.     Future Budget Considerations:    Both the website redesign and new internal computer software platform will require a significant  commitment of public funds.  Those items will be presented to Council at a later date after specific  recommendations are formulated by staff.         - 47 -   FY 2012‐13 City Council Strategic Plan    Priority:    Organizational Effectiveness    Staff Contact:  Tom Markus, City Manager    Goal: The City shall proactively look toward the future to ensure that services are  continually able to be delivered at high levels and that relationships with  external stakeholders are strong and productive.      Action Plan:     The City Manager’s office is focusing on two key areas in order to meet City Council expectations. First,  staff is conducting a succession plan for the organization. This effort is being jointly led by staff from the  City Manager’s Office and Human Resources. The succession plan process includes analyzing the staffing  of each department and identifying management and highly skilled positions that are likely to  experience turnover during the next five years. Additionally, the plan will identify key challenges and/or  opportunities presented by the anticipated staff turnover. Such examples may include the loss of highly  technical or specialized skills, and general institutional knowledge. The plan will identify strategies to  better prepare the organization for the anticipated turnover in key positions.     Secondly, the City Manager is actively working to build relationships and establish more effective lines of  communication with our Federal and State elected representatives. As Federal and State lawmakers  consider legislation and appropriations that impacts our community, it is increasingly important that  Iowa City has a strong voice in Des Moines and Washington D.C. With a focus on the adopted 2012  Legislative Priorities, the City Manager is working with our elected officials, lobbyist and membership  organizations to make certain that the City’s perspective is fully understood and considered at all levels  of government. Similarly, the City is continually identifying key projects that may align with Federal  and/or State initiatives. This will allow the City to more proactively leverage local funds and progress  with flood mitigation, economic, public safety and other key local projects.     Progress to Date:    Succession Plan    Staff has completed phase one of the organizational succession plan effort. This phase included a high‐ level demographic analysis of the organization, as well as an internal analysis of management positions  with a focus on those that have a high probability of turnover due to retirement or other known  circumstances in the next five years.  This analysis highlighted the need for further succession planning,  as it revealed a significant number of people holding management level positions that are currently or  will soon become eligible for retirement.     Staff is currently working on phase two of the succession plan effort. Phase two focuses on the following  efforts:     Identifying strategies that will help transfer institutional knowledge and expertise in the areas of  the organization where management level position turnover is anticipated  - 48 -    Evaluating current service delivery strategies and identifying opportunities to achieve greater  efficiencies and value through restructuring when management level position become vacant   Identifying skill sets and values that will be sought for future management level positions   Developing opportunities to promote such values and skill sets among current and future  employees through targeted training and performance assessments / professional development  tools    Staff anticipates that the phase two succession planning analysis will produce actions that have  applicability across the entire organization. Additionally, there will likely be more detailed actions that  focus on a few specific areas of the organization, which are expected to experience the greatest amount  of management turnover in the next five years.  The largest area of focus will be on the Public Works  department.    Partnership with State and Federal Officials    The City Council adopted its annual legislative priorities in January of 2012 and has authorized the hiring  of the Davis Brown Law Firm for lobbying services at the State level. Staff is actively working with Davis  Brown, the Metro Coalition and the Iowa League of Cities to ensure that the City’s position is being  presented effectively. Communication with our lobbyist occurs on a weekly basis at minimum, with  more frequent contact as needed. Communication with our partners in the Metro Coalition occurs every  other week, with more frequent contact as needed.     Staff continues to seek State and Federal funding opportunities for local projects. Below is a listing of  state and federal grants secured since the adoption of the strategic plan:     The Iowa Economic Development Authority announced a fourth round of funding for the Single  Family New Construction (SFNC) Program, thus extending this program into 2012‐13. Iowa City is  eligible to receive $1,390,227, which will allow for approximately 32 new homes for this  program aimed at rebuilding the housing stock after the 2008 flood. To date, Iowa City has  assisted with 93 new housing units with another 15 to be completed by March of 2012.  After  this latest round of funding is spent, Iowa City will have assisted with approximately 140 new  housing units since the 2008 flood.    The City applied for and was awarded $1.7 million in additional CDBG buyout funds for the Park  View Terrace neighborhood. The additional funds will allow for the acquisition and demolition of  four additional homes. With the newly awarded funding, the total CDBG buyout program since  the flood of 2008 totals over $17 million.     The City will be applying to access an additional $850,000 in CDBG‐DR funds for development of  multi‐family affordable housing. A project consisting of seven affordable units to be built by  Skogman on the northeast corner of Hickory Trail and First Avenue was selected after a review  committee considered several alternatives.    Iowa City was awarded a 6% increase, or $639,218, in federal Community Development Block  Grant (CDBG) funding for the 2012‐13 fiscal year. The increase is especially positive news, given  that most other communities across the country received a 10% or larger reduction in funding.  The long‐term CDBG funding trend is still negative as the current allocation is approximately  33% below that of ten years ago.  - 49 -    Iowa City’s allocation for the federal HOME program, which focuses on affordable housing, was  reduced to $381,851, representing a 36% reduction from last year. This cut is consistent with  cuts from other cities across the country. In the last ten years the City’s annual HOME funding  has been reduced by 47%.    The Iowa City Police Department filed a joint application with the Johnson County Sheriff’s  Office for a $32,164 U.S. Department of Justice grant. This grant will help offset costs to training  police staff at the Cedar Rapids shooting range.   In addition to seeking out funding for community projects, staff has actively been communicating our  position on statewide legislative proposals impacting cities. While most communication is channeled  through our lobbyists, staff also corresponds directly with our legislators and travels to Des Moines,  when deemed appropriate.  Examples of such proposals include:   Commercial Property Tax Reform ‐ Both the House and Senate had advanced discussions and  debates on commercial property tax reform, including reclassifying apartments as residential  uses. However, no agreement was reached and thus the property tax structure remains status  quo.    Municipal Use of Red Light Cameras – The City communicated its position to continue to allow  municipal governments the right to decide if such technologies were appropriate for use within  their jurisdictions. A ban of such technologies was introduced but did not succeed through both  chambers.   Preemption of Occupancy Regulations – A legislative proposal surfaced that would have  restricted a city’s right to regulate occupancy of residential structures by the number of  unrelated persons. Iowa City is one of many cities throughout the country that uses such  regulations to ensure safe living conditions and mitigate neighborhood nuisances. The proposal  to preempt a city’s ability to regulate on this basis did not succeed.    Low‐Head Dam Program Funding – Iowa City advocated for the State to restore the low head  dam program, which had not received funding in the past year. This state program helps  communities ensure that damns are safe and also can allow for greater recreational uses on  rivers. Iowa City is looking at needed changes to the Burlington Street damn and this program  may provide financial assistance to carry that effort forward. The approved state budget  restored a million dollars of funding for this project.    Road Use Tax – This revenue source has not kept up with increasing maintenance needs of our  transportation infrastructure. As a result, more work is being deferred or completed with other  revenue sources (e.g. general obligation bonds). While there was some discussion on an  increase in the road use tax, no proposals materialized in the spring session.    Tax Increment Financing – There was significant statewide attention on Tax Increment Financing  (TIF) this session. Iowa City worked with the Metro Coalition to advocate for changes that would  make the process more transparent, provide for a better data collection mechanism and  strengthen the antipiracy regulations that govern the economic development tool. Cities will  now be required to submit annual TIF reports to the State, which will be collected in a  searchable database. Individual TIF projects now require a public hearing, which will invite more  - 50 -   opportunity for community discussion and input from other taxing jurisdictions. Finally,  municipalities can no longer relocate businesses from other jurisdictions unless there is a  written agreement between the communities or there is a public finding that without such  incentive there will be a statewide loss of employment or wage earnings.    411 Pension System ‐ No structural changes to this public safety pension system were seriously  considered. There was an effort to restore State funding to help offset rapidly escalating costs  for cities, however no such funding was secured.    Passenger Rail Funding – No action was taken in the spring session as the legislature is awaiting  the completion of an IaDOT study on the proposed service from Chicago to Omaha. In May, the  IaDOT announced the preferred route, which runs through Iowa City.  Further study is being  conducted on the preferred route and the final report is expected in late 2012 or early 2013.  Staff has attended both IaDOT passenger rail advisory committee meetings in Des Moines this  spring. These meetings help ensure that everyone is updated on the project timeline. The  meetings have also connected staff with other project advocates across the state. Staff is  currently working with those partners to develop an advocacy strategy. In the past few months,  staff made presentations on this project to the IaDOT passenger rail advisory committee, the  Iowa Passenger Rail Association and local service groups.  In conjunction with the Greater Des  Moines Partnership and the Iowa City Area Chamber of Commerce, the City sponsored an  educational event in May featuring nationally known transit advocate John Robert Smith, CEO of  Reconnecting America.   Staff attended a number of advocacy events in Des Moines this spring. Examples of such events included  those hosted by the Iowa City Area Chamber of Commerce, Iowa League of Cities and various  professional associations that involve management level staff. The City also actively participated in the  Chamber of Commerce’s annual Washington D.C. legislative trip this past spring.    In the coming year, staff will be evaluating the effectiveness of both our state and federal lobbying  efforts. Any recommendations that stem from this evaluation will be forwarded to Council at a later  date and will also be included in subsequent status reports.   Future Budget Considerations:    None at this time                        - 51 - - 52 - INTRODUCTION TO THE FINANCIAL PLAN Financial and Fiscal Policies Preparation of the Financial Plan Budgetary Fund Structure Full Time Equivalents (FTE) Summary F Y 2 0 1 3 FINANCIAL AND FISCAL POLICIES The City of Iowa City's financial policies set forth the basic framework for the overall fiscal management of the City. These policies assist the decision-making process of the City Council. These policies provide guidelines for evaluating both current activities and proposals for future programs. Most of the policies represent long-standing principles, traditions and practices, and follow generally accepted accounting principles which have guided the City in the past and have helped maintain financial stability. OPERATING BUDGET POLICIES  The City will prepare an annual balanced budget for all operating funds. A balanced budget is one that has revenues sufficient to equal expenditures.  The City will maintain a budgetary control system to ensure adherence to the budget and will prepare monthly reports comparing actual revenues and expenditures to budgeted amounts.  Operating budgets are established on a fund/department/program basis.  A contingency account will be maintained in the annual General Fund operating budget to provide for unanticipated expenditures or to meet unexpected small increases in service delivery costs, budgeted annually at approximately ¾ of one percent of expenditures and transfers out. The City Council will be informed semi- annually on staff initiated amendments from the contingency account to the operating programs within the General Fund.  Budget amendments may be made throughout the year with approval of the Department Director, Director of Finance and the City Manager. The City Council formally reviews and approves all amendments processed by staff twice a year in August/September and May.  Increases or amendments to operating budgets are made only in the following situations: - emergency situations - transfer from contingency - expenditures with offsetting revenues or fund balance - carry-over of prior year budget authority for expenses that had not been paid as of the end of the fiscal year. - 53 - OPERATING BUDGET PREPARATION CRITERIA General Guidelines: ‐ Maintain the fiscal integrity of the City’s operating and capital improvement budgets in order to provide services and to construct and maintain the City’s infrastructure. ‐ Maintain the City’s responsible fiscal position and AAA bond rating. ‐ Present budget data to the City Council in a format that will facilitate annual budget decisions based on a three-year planning perspective. Provide the City Council with a summary of the three-year forecasts. ‐ Encourage citizen involvement in the annual budget decision-making process through public hearings, informal meetings, budget briefs and related informational efforts. Service Level Guidelines: ‐ Deliver service levels which are consistent with the citizens' willingness to pay and the City's available resources. ‐ Base decisions to reduce service levels or eliminate programs on City-wide priorities. ‐ Recognize that City employees are one of the City government's most valuable resources and are essential to the delivery of high quality, efficient services. Revenue Guidelines: ‐ Property tax levy rates will not exceed the limits as established by the State of Iowa. ‐ Revise user fee rate structures to charge the costs of service provided to the benefiting customers, while maintaining sensitivity to the needs of low income citizens. ‐ Support federal and state legislation which provides property tax relief. Oppose legislation which imposes local service mandates without fiscal support. Expenditure Guidelines: Support responsible management efforts to increase productivity by providing resources for office automation, preventive maintenance, risk management/employee safety, and employee training. - 54 - REVENUE POLICIES  The City will try to maintain a diversified and stable revenue system to minimize short-run fluctuations in any one revenue source.  The City will attempt to maximize benefits from major revenue sources as a way of maintaining a stable property tax rate.  The City will follow an aggressive policy of collecting revenues.  The City will establish all user charges and fees at a level related to the full cost (operating, direct, and indirect) of providing the service, whenever practical.  The City will review licenses, fees, and charges annually to determine if the revenues support the cost of providing the service.  The finance goal of Recreation programs is for fees to provide 50% of departmental funding.  Parking, Refuse, Wastewater Treatment, Stormwater, Landfill, Broadband Telecommunications and Water funds will be self-supporting through user fees. - Rate adjustments will be submitted to the City Council by ordinance if state or locally legislated, or by resolution (if not state or locally legislated).  The City will use up to 5% of the annual Road Use Tax allocation to fund employee benefits for the Streets and Traffic Engineering personnel. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT POLICIES  It shall be the policy of Iowa City to maintain an economic development plan. The purpose of the plan is to attract new development including residential, commercial and industrial uses. Further, the purpose of the plan is to retain the city's existing business operations and to encourage them to expand and foster spin-off business operations. The city's plan also supports organizations which help to incubate, grow, foster, and create new business operations by providing non-traditional collaborative environments.  The expected results of the economic development plan are: increased economic activity, more jobs, lower unemployment, higher wages, greater property values, more tax revenues, more ownership and entrepreneurial opportunities and revitalization of underutilized or blighted areas.  The city will consider the use of incentive programs including city, state and federal economic development funds, tax increment financing, public private partnerships and other tools in order to achieve the expected results. - 55 -  Various evaluative tools including financial pro forma's, written evaluation reports, established benefit metrics, and other performance tools shall be used to monitor the use of economic incentives from the early stages of project development through the issuance of an incentive and post incentive to make sure the objectives are met.  Developers who receive incentives will be expected to enter into development agreements which delineate the terms, conditions, understandings and the expected results of receiving an incentive.  It will be the policy of the City of Iowa City to endeavor to attract, recruit, retain, foster and develop business that is new to our region or metropolitan statistical area (MSA) through the use of incentives. The city will not actively recruit business from other jurisdictions within our MSA unless a business is seeking to expand or considering a relocation outside the state. Should businesses from jurisdictions within our MSA wish to locate in the City of Iowa City we will notify our neighboring jurisdiction of the interest. It will be the general practice of the City of Iowa City to not provide economic incentives to business wishing to relocate from another jurisdiction within our MSA unless a business is seeking to expand or considering a relocation outside the state.  When incentive programs are utilized they will be used to maximize the benefits to the City of Iowa City. The dollar amount of the incentive and time duration of the incentive shall be smallest amount necessary to achieve the maximum amount of city benefit as determined by the City of Iowa City, City Council.  Despite the need for the program to be flexible and nimble in order to respond to the ever changing economic conditions of the marketplace it will be the policy of the city to insure that the process of using incentives is an open and transparent public process which instills confidence in the public’s understanding of how economic development incentives are utilized. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM BUDGET POLICIES  The City will develop a multi-year Capital Improvement Program (CIP), which will be reviewed and updated annually, comply with City Council goals and be compatible with the Comprehensive Plan whenever possible.  The complete multi-year CIP funding plan must be balanced each year by matching projected expenditures with proposed revenue sources by fund.  Funding for projects should be obtained through borrowing from: - bond market, general obligation or revenue bonds - enterprise fund operations and reserves - internal loans - 56 -  The City may utilize General Fund cash balances to fund capital projects whenever available and feasible. For the Airport, it is policy that the General Fund will match up to $100,000 in grants received per year.  The City shall utilize available funding sources for capital improvements whenever practical and feasible such as but not limited to: - federal and state grant funds - special assessments - developer contributions  The City will maintain its physical assets at a level adequate to protect the City's capital investment and to minimize future maintenance and replacement costs. The budget will provide for the adequate maintenance and the orderly replacement of the capital plant and equipment from current revenues when possible. RESERVE POLICIES  The City will establish a contingency line-item in the annual General Fund operating budget to provide for unanticipated expenditures or to meet unexpected small increases in service delivery costs, budgeted at ¾ of one percent of expenditures and transfers out.  Operating cash balances at fiscal year-end will be maintained at a level to ensure sufficient cash flow throughout the fiscal year. Undesignated cash balance in the General Fund will not go below 15% of total expenditures, with a ceiling of 25%. Cash balances in excess of 25% will be considered for tax relief.  Reserves will be maintained in the Water, Wastewater and Parking Funds in accordance with existing bond covenant provisions.  Reserves will be maintained for equipment replacement and for unexpected major repairs in the following areas: Parking, Wastewater, Water, Landfill, Transit, Broadband Telecommunication, Equipment Replacement, Information Technology Services, and Central Services as well as Library Computer Equipment and Parkland Acquisition and Replacement.  Reserves, based on actuaries, will be maintained for the Risk Management Loss Reserve, Medical and Dental Insurance Funds.  All City trucks, cars and necessary accessories will be maintained on a replacement cost basis each year. A separate reserve fund has been set up to fund these replacements. Additions to the fleet are made through allocations in the annual budget. Fire Department vehicles and Transit buses will be purchased through the issuance of debt.  All general obligation debt will be paid from the Debt Service Fund. General - 57 - Obligation debt applicable to Enterprise Fund projects will be paid out of the Debt Service Fund, but will be abated from revenues from the respective Enterprise Fund(s). INVESTMENT POLICIES  Disbursement, collection, and deposit of all funds will be managed to insure maximum investment opportunity for City funds.  The City will strive to maximize the return on its investment portfolio, with the primary objective of preserving capital in accordance with the City's investment policy and prudent investment practices.  All City funds not restricted by bond issue covenants will be pooled for investments, with interest allocations made monthly. DEBT POLICIES  The City will confine long-term borrowing to capital improvements and Community and Economic Development initiatives. Short term borrowing will be applicable for large dollar rolling stock (buses, fire apparatus) purchases and computer systems.  Total general obligation debt will not exceed 5% of total taxable assessed value of real property.  The debt service property tax levy shall not exceed 30% of the total property tax levy.  The City will follow a policy of full disclosure on every financial report and bond prospectus.  The City will use "pay as you go" financing to fund general capital improvement projects, whenever feasible and practical. COMPENSATED ABSENCES Administrative employees hired prior to June 15, 1983 and all other employees hired prior to June 29, 1985, upon death, retirement or termination (except firefighters) are entitled to be paid for one-half of the total accumulated sick leave hours at the current effective hourly rate for that employee up to the sick leave payout amount calculated as of June 28, 1985, whichever is less. After June 28, 1985, employees accumulate vacation, sick leave, and other benefits at various rates depending on bargaining group and length of service. Employees are paid for their total unused vacation time upon death, termination (except firefighters) or - 58 - retirement. However, sick leave can only be used during employment. The cost of compensated absences are recognized when payments are made to employees and the City amends the budget at that time. ACCOUNTING, AUDITING, AND FINANCIAL REPORTING POLICIES  Quarterly financial reports will be prepared.  A three-year financial plan for all operating funds will be prepared by the City Manager and presented to the City Council for their review.  A Multi-Year Capital Improvement Program budget will be prepared, reviewed and revised annually.  An independent audit will be performed annually for all City funds.  The City will produce a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles as outlined by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board. PURCHASING POLICIES Purchases for all City departments for the City of Iowa City shall be in accordance with the City’s Purchasing Policy Manual (April 17, 2012). Methods of source selection are as follows: Public Improvements: o Competitive sealed bidding shall be used for Public Improvement Contracts of vertical infrastructure – buildings, parking facilities, utilities and trails of $125,000 or greater (Code of Iowa). This process shall consist of: 1. Public hearing on plans and specifications 2. Approval of plans and specifications by City Council or Commission 3. Invitation for bids 4. Bid opening 5. Bid acceptance and bid evaluation 6. Bid award – City Council/Commission authorization o The competitive quotation process is required for vertical infrastructure public improvement projects estimated between $69,000 and $125,000. This process shall consist of: 1. Notice to bidders 2. Bid opening 3. Bid evaluation 4. Bid acceptance and award by City Manager or Commission 5. Notice of award in minutes of next meeting of - 59 - City Council or Commission o Competitive sealed bidding shall be used for Public Improvement Contracts of horizontal infrastructure – roads, streets, bridges and culverts of $67,000 or greater (Code of Iowa). This process shall consist of: 1. Public hearing on plans and specifications 2. Approval of plans and specifications by City Council or Commission 3. Invitation for bids 4. Bid opening 5. Bid acceptance and bid evaluation 6. Bid award – City Council/Commission authorization o The informal quotation process is required for public improvement projects and street, bridge and culvert projects under $67,000. This process shall consist of: 1. Invitation to bid 2. Bid opening 3. Bid evaluation 4. Bid acceptance and award by City Manager over $20,000, Department Director or designee up to $20,000. Professional Services: Within approved budgets, the City Manager may approve contracts up to $50,000 and the City Council approves contracts over $50,000. For contracts greater than $10,000 but no more than $50,000, the City utilizes the informal competitive procedure, obtaining a minimum of 3 written proposals. For contracts greater than $50,000, the competitive bidding procedure is used with formal sealed bids and request for proposal. Specific guidelines for Professional Services are outlined on pages 5 & 12 of the Purchasing Policy Manual. Major Purchases: City Manager approval is required on all purchases $150,000 or less. City Council approval is required on purchases over $150,000. Emergency Purchases: In the event of an emergency, supplies, services or construction may be purchased without regard to normal purchase selection procedures to protect the health and welfare of the public. The City Manager shall keep the City Council informed of the extent of the emergency. Please see the Purchasing Policy Manual, page 14, for emergency purchase procedures. Gifts/Conflict of Interest/Prohibited Interest in Public Contracts: Conduct shall be in accordance with the Code of Iowa - Chapters 68B.22 Gifts, 331.342 Conflict of Interest and 362.5 Prohibited Interest in Public Contract. A City officer or employee shall not have an interest, direct or indirect, in any contract or job of work or material or the profits thereof or services to be furnished or performed for the officers or employees of the City. Please see the Purchasing Policy Manual page 18 for specifics. - 60 - RISK MANAGEMENT POLICIES  It shall be the policy of the City of Iowa City to assume the risk of property damage, liability and dishonesty in all cases in which the exposure is so small or dispersed that the loss would not significantly or adversely affect the operations or financial position of the City.  Insurance will not be purchased to cover loss exposures below prevailing deductible/retention amounts of current insurance held by the City of Iowa City, unless such insurance is required by statute or by contact, or in those instances in which it is desirable to obtain special services, such as inspection or claim adjustment services in connection with insurance. The deductible/retention amounts will be reviewed once annually by the Director of Finance and the Risk Manager to ensure appropriateness of the amounts.  Insurance will be purchased where possible against all major exposures which might result in loss in excess of the City's insurance reserve through the purchase of the following types of insurance: - All risk insurance on real and personal property. - General liability insurance. - Automobile liability insurance. - Fidelity and crime insurance. - Catastrophic workmen's compensation insurance. The City will self-insure in those instances where the cost of insurance is so high that it would be more cost effective to assume the risk.  Real property will be insured on replacement cost basis, as determined by a competent appraisal service, against as wide a range of perils as possible. The value will be reviewed once annually by the Risk Manager and the City's insurance advisor.  Loss prevention recommendations made by insurance companies, the state fire marshal or local fire authorities will, whenever possible, be implemented. In those cases in which such recommendations are not followed, a written report in which an explanation or justification is made will be filed with the Director of Finance and the City Manager within 30 days of receipt of the report.  Insurance will be purchased only through licensed agents or agencies who have the staff and technical competence to adequately service the insurance provided.  Insurance will be placed only in insurance companies rated A+ or A in Bests. Insurance placed in other companies will require a written report of the particulars, such report to be filed with the Risk Manager. - 61 -  The administration of the risk management policy will be a responsibility of the Risk Manager. Such responsibility includes placement of insurance coverage, maintenance of property appraisals and inventories, processing of claims and maintenance of loss records, and supervision of loss prevention activities.  Settlement of claims are handled through the Risk Management Division and/or City Attorney Office. The Risk Manager is authorized to settle claims up to $3,000, the City Manager authorizes claim settlements between $3,000 and $20,000 and City Council approval is needed for settlements above $20,000. - 62 - PREPARATION OF THE FINANCIAL PLAN Introduction This Three-Year Financial Plan is for fiscal years FY2013 through FY2015, which begins July 1 and ends June 30. The Financial Plan includes a one-year annual budget as required by Iowa Code, and provides two projection years as a planning tool. The purpose of the overview is to disclose the basis on which the financial plan has been prepared. The role of a government's operating budget differs from that of a private business. Budgets are an important internal planning tool for business, but they also play an external role for governmental entities. A multi-year financial plan informs parties inside and outside government of future objectives and provision of services to its constituents. The three-year plan also permits a more comprehensive review of the City’s financial condition, allowing analysis of current and future needs and requirements. During preparation of the plan, careful review is made of property tax levy rates, utility and user fee requirements, ending cash balances by fund, debt service obligations, bond financing needs, capital outlay for equipment purchases, and major capital improvement projects. This document contains operating budgets for the governmental funds: general, special revenue, debt service, capital project and permanent funds. It also includes business type funds and internal service funds. Internal service fund activities are considered non- budgetary in that they are not formally appropriated, reported to the State of Iowa or included in the adopted budget resolution approved by City Council each year. This is in accordance with the state’s filing requirements. Financial summaries for “All Funds” exclude these non-budgetary funds. Budget projections are summarized by major revenue and expenditure categories within each division. A separate multi-year Capital Improvements Program (CIP) shows budgeted revenue and expenditures for FY2012 through FY2016. Basis of Accounting The cash basis of accounting has been used for preparation of this document. Revenues are projected on when they’ll be received, not necessarily when they are earned, and expenditures are projected for when they will be paid out rather than when they are incurred. The government-wide financial statements and proprietary funds are accounted for on the flow of economic resources measurement focus and use the accrual basis of accounting. Agency funds do not have a measurement focus and use the accrual basis of accounting. Under the accrual method, revenues are recorded when earned and - 63 - expenses are recorded at the time liabilities are incurred. The City applies all applicable Financial Accounting Standards Board pronouncements issued on or before November 30, 1989, except those that conflict with GASB pronouncements, in accounting and reporting for these funds. All governmental funds are accounted for using a current financial resources measurement focus, which generally includes only current assets and current liabilities on the balance sheet. The modified accrual basis of accounting is used for these funds. Under the modified accrual basis, revenue is recognized when susceptible to accrual, which is in the period in which it becomes both available (collectible within the current period or soon thereafter to be used to pay liabilities of the current period) and measurable (the amount of the transaction can be determined). Revenue accrued includes property taxes, intergovernmental revenue, and interest earned on investments (if they are collected within 60 days after the year-end). Expenditures are recorded when the related fund liability is incurred. Principal and interest on long-term debt, as well as expenditures related to compensated absences and claims and judgments, are recorded only when payment is due. The City maintains its records on a modified cash basis of accounting under which only cash receipts, cash disbursements and encumbrances, investments, and bonded debt are recorded. These modified cash basis accounting records have been adjusted to the accrual or modified accrual basis, as necessary. Annual Preparation Schedule In August, the Finance Department writes a manual of directions and updates all forms. The manual contains: 1) directions for completing the forms, 2) descriptions of expenditures that may be budgeted in a particular line item, and 3) projected prices or inflation factors for various supplies, service contracts, vehicle maintenance service, telephone and postal services, and office furniture and equipment. The City Manager instructs the Department Heads on whether any changes in level of service can be factored into the proposed financial plan. This is done before the actual budget process starts. Changes to the financial plan are done annually during the budget process. All revenue and expenditure estimates are re-evaluated and revised if necessary. In September, the manual and forms for the next financial plan are distributed to Department and Division Heads. They also receive salary projections, a three year history of each Department’s/Division’s actual line item expenditures, and projected revenues and costs for the three years covered by the Financial Plan. (The Finance Department projects revenues individually and uses a combination of inflation factors and individual costs to project expenditures.) - 64 - In October, the forms are returned. These include the Department/Division’s adjustments to line item revenue and expenditure projections, their travel request, their capital outlay request, and professional services required. In November, the Finance Department reviews the forms and compiles them all into a budget. All budget forms and adjustments are forwarded to the City Manager. By mid-December, the City Manager and Finance Department decide which modifications to operations will be made. A tax levy is computed. Analysis is done so all funds have required balances or zero balances. Then the Proposed Financial Plan document is printed. City Council reviews the Proposed Financial Plan during the month of January. In February, The Proposed Financial Plan and a memo of Council’s changes are presented to the public. A public hearing is held at least one week prior to the final adoption. In March, the final Financial Plan is adopted. The State of Iowa requires a one-year budget be adopted by March 15 of each year. The applicable year in Iowa City’s three- year Financial Plan is adopted as the annual budget to satisfy State requirements. Amending the Adopted Budget Department Directors and appointed staff are responsible for analyzing monthly financial reports to determine if expenditures will exceed budgeted appropriations. The Finance Department also monitors the status of actual revenues and expenses compared to budget, working directly with department/division management to resolve any problems identified within the line item budget. Examples of items which may require an amendment include: grant-funded activities, unanticipated repair of equipment or buildings, temporary employee wages and overtime. On amendment requests, departments/divisions explain the reason for additional funding and are asked to suggest a funding source: 1) Reallocation of budget appropriations within their own budget; 2) New or increased revenues (grant funding, increase participation/user fees); 3) Contingency funding (use of cash balance). Requests are then reviewed by the Budget/Management Analyst and forwarded to the Finance Director and City Manager for approval. If the request is approved, the amendment is processed so that subsequent budget comparison reports will reflect the change. Requests must be submitted for review by early spring (a date set by the Finance Department annually) as is necessary to compile reports for publication and state certification. - 65 - Amendments are typically presented to the City Council twice a year, with a public hearing held each time to allow for citizen input. The first public hearing is usually held in early fall, the second and/or final hearing is in late spring. All amendments must be formally approved and certified to the State of Iowa by May 31st, as required by law. Financial statements which compare the fiscal year’s actual revenues and expenditures to budgeted authority are published by the 1st of December immediately following the end of the fiscal year (June 30). These statements are also presented for the City as a whole in the notes to that year’s Financial Report. Legal compliance is met if actual expenditures do not exceed the budgeted expenditures by program areas: Public Safety, Public Works, Health & Social Services, Culture and Recreation, Community and Economic Development, General Government, Debt Service, Capital Projects and Business Type/Enterprises. - 66 - Financial Plan Preparation Schedule FY2013 – 2015 August 10 Distribution of Performance Measure packets to departments. August 24 – 31 Individual meetings with staff. Provide support, as needed, with measurements, goals and objectives. September 7 Performance Measurement data, goals and objectives due to Finance Administration September 14 or 21 Distribution of FY13 financial planning materials to departments. October 5 FY13 budget proposals due to Finance Administration. October 5-14 Proposals forwarded to City Manager for review. October 17 – November 4 City Manager, Finance Administration, department directors and managers review financial plan. October 17 - November 11 Input approved adjustments from City Manager. November 14 Preparation of the proposed financial plan and FY13 thru December 7 budget by Finance Administration. December 15 Distribution of proposed Financial Plan to City Council. (PDF due to Clerk’s office December 12-13) January 2012 City Council budget work sessions. January 25 State forms prepared. January 31 Set Public Hearing & send hearing notice to newspaper. February 14 Public Hearing. February 28 City Council approves FY2013 budget , the FY2013-2015 Financial Plan and FY12-16 CIP Plan. - 67 - BUDGETARY FUND STRUCTURE A fund is a grouping of related accounts that is used to maintain control over resources that have been segregated for specific activities or objectives. The City, like other state and local governments, uses fund accounting to ensure and demonstrate compliance with finance-related legal requirements. All of the funds of the City can be divided into three categories: governmental funds, proprietary funds, and fiduciary funds. Governmental Funds  General Fund is the City’s primary operating fund and includes activities in the following areas: general government administration, public work administration, public safety, cultural and recreational activities, community and economic development.  Special revenue funds account for proceeds from specific sources (other than those accounted for within capital projects funds) which are usually required by law or regulation to be accounted for in separate funds and to be expended for specific purposes. Examples include the employee benefits tax levy; Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Program, Flood Recovery & Hazard Mitigation Grant monies: Road Use Tax receipts; activities of the Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (formerly known as JCCOG), General Rehabilitation and Improvement Program (GRIP) and UniverCity; and taxes generated for a Self-Supporting Municipal Improvement District (SSMID).  TIF Special Revenue Funds account for activities specific to Tax Increment Financing Districts.  The Debt Service Fund accounts for principal and interest payments on the City’s general long-term debt. Funding is provided by the debt service property tax levy, transfers from Water Operations, and loan repayments.  Capital Project Funds account for the acquisition and/or construction of major facilities and assets in excess of $25,000.  Permanent Funds account for resources in which the entity is restricted to expending earnings and not principal for purposes that support a specific program. This includes Iowa City’s Perpetual Care Fund for Oakland Cemetery. Business-Type Activities  Proprietary (Enterprise) funds are primarily self-supporting in that they are financed by program and/or user fees for the services provided. Such functions for the City of Iowa City include Parking, Transit, Wastewater Treatment, Water, Refuse / Solid Waste, Landfill, and Stormwater Management. The Iowa City Airport, Broadband Telecommunications and Iowa City Housing Authority are also - 68 - classified as business-type funds. The Iowa City Airport is not self-supporting at this time and receives $100,000 property tax subsidy each year. Broadband Telecommunications is funded through a non-exclusive franchise agreement. The Iowa City Housing Authority’s primary funding source is through the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)’s federal grant and voucher programs.  Internal service funds are also self-supporting and financed on a cost- reimbursement basis through charges to the departments and divisions (budgetary units) which utilize their goods and services. Such activities are not reportable, based on the State of Iowa’s budget filing requirements, nor are they reflected in the government-wide financial statements. Funds in this category include Equipment / Fleet Maintenance, Information Technology Services, Risk Management Loss Reserves, Central Services, and the Health and Dental Insurance Reserves. Fiduciary funds account for resources held for the benefit of parties outside the city government. For this reason, fiduciary funds are not appropriated through the budget process, nor are they reflected in the government-wide financial statements. The City has two fiduciary funds: Project Green and Library Foundation. Fund Balance Fund balance is the difference between assets and liabilities on the governmental funds balance sheet. In fund financial statements, governmental funds identify specific fund balance amounts which are not available for general re-appropriation due to internal or external legal restrictions; or because the funds have been identified for a specific public purpose or use. Portions of fund balance fall under one or more of the following four categories:  Restricted: Restricted fund balance is cash on hand which has limitations imposed upon it by external creditors, grantors, contributors, laws and regulations of other governments or laws through constitutional provisions or enabling legislation.  Committed: Monies which are committed have self-imposed limitations imposed at highest level of decision making within the organization. Such limitations require formal action at the same level to remove.  Assigned: The assigned portion of the net position of a governmental fund that represents resources set aside by the government for a particular purpose.  Unassigned: Residual net resources. Total fund balance in the general fund in excess of nonspendable, restricted, committed and assigned fund balance. - 69 - It is the City’s policy to maintain an unassigned fund balance within the General Fund at a minimum of 15% and not to exceed 25% of the fiscal year’s expenditures. Fund balance in excess of 25% is to be considered for tax relief. The following summaries show projected cash balance through June 30, 2013. City of Iowa City Fund Balance Projections by Major Fund FY2011 – 2013 General Debt Service Capital Non-Major Total Govt.Business-Typ e Total Fund Fund Projects Funds Funds Funds All Funds Annual Report FY2011 Beginning Balance 27,541,067 12,813,002 12,057,292 465,973 52,877,334 103,090,523 155,967,857 Actual Revenues 59,797,006 24,617,198 34,832,303 38,249,390 157,495,897 70,097,047 227,592,944 Actual Expenditures (50,807,135) (14,118,274) (27,753,986) (33,908,038) (126,587,433) (93,454,119) (220,041,552) Ending Balance 36,530,938 23,311,926 19,135,609 4,807,325 83,785,798 79,733,451 163,519,249 Re-Estimated FY2012 Beginning Balance 36,530,938 23,311,926 19,135,609 4,807,325 83,785,798 79,733,451 163,519,249 Revenue 61,885,608 15,305,002 92,603,831 39,917,656 209,712,097 107,998,567 317,710,664 Expenditures (81,371,086) (28,725,872) (104,694,174) (41,519,496) (256,310,628) (123,914,451) (380,225,079) Ending Balance 17,045,460 9,891,056 7,045,266 3,205,485 37,187,267 63,817,567 101,004,834 Budget FY2013 Beginning Balance 17,045,460 9,891,056 7,045,266 3,205,485 37,187,267 63,817,567 101,004,834 Revenue 57,735,884 14,237,901 35,780,266 21,696,847 129,450,898 85,619,083 215,069,981 Expenditures (57,497,737) (20,226,046) (35,926,815) (21,838,728) (135,489,326) (89,182,749) (224,672,075) Ending Balance 17,283,607 3,902,911 6,898,717 3,063,604 31,148,839 60,253,901 91,402,740 Fund Type Overall, the City’s fund balance is projected to decrease by $9.6 million in FY2013 due to redemption of $5.6 million in General Obligation Bonds, Series 2004 from tax increment financing cash on hand (Debt Service Fund); and a July 1, 2012 advance refunding of $4.9 million Water Revenue Bonds, Series 2002 from bond proceeds received in FY2012 (Business-Type Funds). - 70 - City of Iowa City Projected Changes in Fund Balance - FY2013 Estimated Total Estimated Beginning Total Disburse- Ending Fund Balance Receipts ments Balance 1 General 18,584,519 57,735,884 57,497,737 18,822,666 2 Debt Service 9,891,052 14,237,901 20,226,046 3,902,907 3 Capital Projects - Gen. Government 3,529,148 35,780,266 35,926,815 3,382,599 4 Capital Projects - Proprietary 315,007 25,419,500 31,222,673 (5,488,166) 5 CDBG & CDBG Rehab 1,802,268 703,173 698,542 1,806,899 6 HOME Program 131,534 795,893 704,989 222,438 7 Road Use Tax 76,047 6,837,109 6,924,057 (10,901) 8 Other Shared Revenue 29,409 - 390,163 (360,754) 9 Energy Efficiency and Conservation Grant (430,283) 12,000 27,165 (445,448) 10 UniverCity Neighborhood Partnership 78,225 1,910,000 1,916,423 71,802 11 Metropolitan Planning Org. of Johnson Co. 47,576 645,644 663,783 29,437 12 Employee Benefits 1,517,661 9,706,070 9,658,198 1,565,533 13 Peninsula Apartments 68,965 59,728 49,734 78,959 14 TIF (102,516) 507,221 285,931 118,774 15 Council Economic Development Capital (34) - - (34) 16 GRIP-General Rehab. & Improv. Program (81,941) 240,000 240,000 (81,941) 17 Self-Supported Municipal Improv. District - 279,743 279,743 - 18 Perpetual Care 120,932 266 - 121,198 19 Parking 2,688,139 4,863,902 4,351,520 3,200,521 20 Parking Debt Service 1,527,519 846,250 838,975 1,534,794 21 Transit - 6,489,260 6,033,630 455,630 22 Wastewater Treatment 9,066,164 13,110,517 11,329,423 10,847,258 23 Wastewater Treatment Debt Service 12,158,604 4,726,240 6,411,888 10,472,956 24 Water 5,450,012 8,360,557 9,368,041 4,442,528 25 Water Debt Service 9,287,148 2,093,604 2,062,856 9,317,896 26 Refuse Collection 393,863 2,953,839 3,017,382 330,320 27 Landfill 17,767,939 6,816,906 5,315,207 19,269,638 28 Airport 99,210 394,424 393,375 100,259 29 Stormwater Management 98,560 951,914 731,702 318,772 30 Broadband Telecommunications 1,527,107 829,068 783,976 1,572,199 31 Housing Authority 7,557,863 7,763,102 7,322,101 7,998,864 BUDGETARY TOTAL 103,199,697 215,069,981 224,672,075 93,597,603 32 Equipment 6,522,528 5,768,479 5,582,731 6,708,276 33 Risk Management Loss Reserve 2,943,263 900,389 1,138,749 2,704,903 34 Information Technology 2,209,145 1,900,264 1,998,268 2,111,141 35 Central Services 716,878 248,975 189,342 776,511 36 Health Insurance Reserve 7,652,200 7,902,239 7,506,750 8,047,689 37 Dental Insurance Reserve 75,389 358,672 358,495 75,566 NON-BUDGETARY TOTAL 20,119,403 17,079,018 16,774,335 20,424,086 GRAND TOTAL 123,319,100 232,148,999 241,446,410 114,021,689 Notes: 17 Self-Supported Municipal Improvement District approved for taxation beginning in FY2013. 21 Transit Operations were reclassified from General Fund operations to a stand-alone business-type activity beginning in FY2013. - 71 - City of Iowa City Personnel Comparison of Full-Time Equivalents FY2011 - FY2013 Cost Center / Operating Division FY2011 Adopted FY2012 Adopted FY2013 Adopted Change in FTEs FY2012-2013 City Council 7.00 7.00 7.00 - City Clerk 4.00 4.00 4.00 - City Attorney 5.60 5.60 5.60 - City Manager 3.00 3.00 3.00 - Personnel 4.00 4.00 4.00 - Finance Administration 2.86 2.65 2.65 - Accounting*7.00 8.00 8.00 - Purchasing 4.00 4.00 3.94 (0.06) Revenue Division 7.88 7.88 7.88 - Document Services 3.50 4.00 2.00 (2.00) Tort Liability, Insurance 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Operations & Maintenance 4.96 4.83 4.83 - Human Rights 2.50 2.50 2.00 (0.50) Police Department Administration 5.00 5.00 5.00 - Criminal Investigation 8.00 9.00 10.00 1.00 Patrol 71.00 69.00 68.00 (1.00) Records & Identification 6.00 6.00 6.00 - Crime Prevention 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Station Master 5.00 5.00 5.00 - Johnson County Task Force Grant 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Domestic Violence Grant 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Fire Department 66.00 65.00 65.00 - Shelter Operations & Administration 6.00 6.00 6.00 - HIS Department Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 - Building Inspection 7.80 7.80 7.80 - Housing Inspections 5.75 5.75 5.75 - Flood Recovery*0.40 0.40 0.40 - Public Works Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 - Engineering Services 12.10 12.10 12.10 - Parks & Rec Administration 2.00 2.00 2.00 - Recreation 15.42 15.42 15.42 - Parks 13.00 13.00 13.00 - Forestry Operations 3.00 3.00 3.00 - Cemetery Operations 3.00 3.00 3.00 - CBD Maintenance Operations 3.00 3.00 3.00 - Library 43.14 43.64 43.63 (0.01) Senior Center Operations 6.31 6.50 6.50 - PCD Department Admin 2.55 2.55 2.55 - Urban Planning 3.50 3.50 2.50 (1.00) Neighborhood Services 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Non-Grant Community Development 1.05 0.85 1.20 0.35 Human Services - 0.15 0.15 Economic Development 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Total - General Fund 355.32 354.97 351.90 (3.07) - 72 - City of Iowa City Personnel Comparison of Full-Time Equivalents FY2011 - FY2013 Cost Center / Operating Division FY2011 Adopted FY2012 Adopted FY2013 Adopted Change in FTEs FY2012-2013 - Parking Administration & Operations 32.75 32.75 29.25 (3.50) Transit 56.25 56.25 51.75 (4.50) Wastewater Treatment Admin. & Ops 25.60 25.40 25.40 - Water Administration & Operations 32.75 32.75 32.75 - Refuse Collection Admin. & Operations 20.35 20.35 20.35 - Landfill Administration & Operations 15.50 17.50 17.50 - Airport Operations 1.75 1.75 1.00 (0.75) Cable TV Administration & Support 4.94 4.88 4.88 - Local Access Pass Through 1.75 1.75 1.75 - Storm Water Management Operations 1.90 2.10 2.10 - Iowa City Housing Authority 13.25 13.25 13.13 (0.12) Total - Business-Type Funds 206.79 208.73 199.86 (8.87) - Non-Reimbursable Personnel 0.26 0.55 0.55 - Road Use Tax - Traffic Engineering 4.15 4.15 4.15 - Road Use Tax - Street Maint. & Repair 25.50 25.50 25.50 - UniverCity Neighborhood Partnership 0.20 0.20 - CDBG Administration 1.28 1.28 1.23 (0.05) CDBG Rehab-Project Delivery 1.60 1.60 1.40 (0.20) HOME Administration 0.95 0.95 0.70 (0.25) Flood Recovery & Mitigation Grants*1.60 1.60 1.60 - MPO of Johnson Co. - Administration 1.60 1.60 1.60 - MPO of Jo. Co. - Transportation Planning 4.00 4.00 4.00 - MPO of Jo. Co. - Human Services 1.00 1.00 - (1.00) Information Technology Services 11.30 11.80 10.86 (0.94) General Fleet Maintenance 9.88 9.88 9.50 (0.38) Equipment Replacement 1.38 1.38 1.25 (0.13) Mail Service 0.75 0.75 0.75 - Risk Management Administration 2.01 1.80 1.80 - Library Development Office Salary 1.00 1.00 1.00 - Capital Project Administration*3.00 5.00 6.00 1.00 Total - Other Funds 71.26 74.04 72.09 (1.95) GRAND TOTAL - ALL FUNDS:633.37 637.74 623.85 (13.89) * FTE count includes temporary permanent position(s), as follows: Accounting: 1.0 Grant Accountant (FY2012-2013) Flood Recovery & Mitigation Grants: 2.0 Associate Planner (FY2011-2013) Capital Project Administration: 1.0 Systems Project Manager - ERP Software (FY2012-2013) - 73 - City of Iowa City FTE Reconciliation FY2012 - FY2013 From To Net From To Net 1 FTE changes by resolution during FY2011/2012: Cable Television Division: Community Programmer 1.00 - (1.00) Media Production Services Coordinator - 1.00 1.00 City Manager: Assistant City Manager 1.00 - (1.00) Assistant to the City Manager - 1.00 1.00 Capital Projects Admin.: Special Projects Engineer - 1.00 1.00 Equipment: Buyer I - Equip.0.50 0.75 0.25 Equipment Clerk 0.76 0.50 (0.26) Library: Librarian II 7.16 7.00 (0.16) Library Web Specialist 0.75 1.00 0.25 Library Assistant II 1.75 1.00 (0.75) Library Public Relations Specialist - 0.65 0.65 12.92 13.90 0.98 2 FTE changes due to reassignment of cost center: Information Tech. Services: Purchasing Clerk - 0.06 0.06 Purchasing: Purchasing Clerk 1.00 0.94 (0.06) Fire: Captain/Inspector 1.00 - (1.00) Firefighter - 1.00 1.00 Police: Patrol Officer 1.00 - (1.00) Criminal Investigation Officer - 1.00 1.00 CDBG: Associate Planner 0.45 0.25 (0.20) Community Development Coord.0.45 0.40 (0.05) HOME Program: Associate Planner 0.50 0.25 (0.25) Human Services: Associate Planner - 0.15 0.15 Non-Grant Community Development: Associate Planner 0.05 0.35 0.30 Community Development Coord.0.10 0.15 0.05 Parking Admin. & Support: Operations Supervisor - Trans. Services 2.50 3.00 0.50 M.W. I - Parking 4.00 4.50 0.50 Transit Operations: Operations Supervisor - Trans. Services 3.50 3.00 (0.50) M.W. I - Parking 1.00 0.50 (0.50) 15.55 15.55 - Operating Division / Position FY2012 Amended FY2013 Adopted - 74 - City of Iowa City FTE Reconciliation FY2012 - FY2013 From To Net From To NetOperating Division / Position FY2012 Amended FY2013 Adopted 3 Positions eliminated due to attrition: Airport - M.W. I 1.00 - (1.00) Equipment: Equipment Clerk 0.50 - (0.50) Housing Authority: Section 8 Coord.0.12 - (0.12) Human Rights: Human Rights Investigator 1.50 1.00 (0.50) Info.Tech. Services: Sr. Programmer / Analyst 1.00 - (1.00) MPO of Jo. Co.: Human Services Coordinator 1.00 - (1.00) Parking: Parking Enforcement Attendant 6.50 5.00 (1.50) Cashier 12.25 11.25 (1.00) M.W. I - Parking Systems 4.50 3.50 (1.00) M.W. II - Parking Systems (Night)1.00 - (1.00) Transit: Custodian 0.50 - (0.50) M.W. II - Transit 2.00 1.00 (1.00) Urban Planning: Associate Planner 2.50 1.50 (1.00) 34.37 23.25 (11.12) 4 Positions approved / eliminated with the FY2013 Budget Proposal: Airport Operations Specialist 0.75 1.00 0.25 Document Services: Doc. Services Specialist 2.00 - (2.00) Transit Operations: M.W. I - Transit 3.00 2.00 (1.00) Body Repair Mechanic 1.00 - (1.00) 6.75 3.00 (3.75) Net Change FY2012 - FY2013: 5 Positions eliminated due to attrition:From To Net Housing Inspections: Housing/Development Regulations Inspector 1.00 - (1.00) Housing Inspector 1.00 - (1.00) Iowa City Housing Authority: Housing Assistant 1.00 - (1.00) Purchasing: Purchasing Clerk 0.75 - (0.75) Wastewater: Wastewater Lab Tech 1.00 - (1.00) 4.75 - (4.75) 6 Positions approved by council resolution:From To Net Finance Administration: Management Analyst - 1.00 1.00 (13.89) Also of note, a number of significant changes occurred following formal adoption of the FY2013 budget which should be noted. An amendment will be prepared to reduce spending authority in the following areas: - 75 - - 76 - GENERAL FUND SUMMARY Revenues Expenditures Fund Balance F Y 2 0 1 3 GENERAL FUND General Fund is the City’s main operating fund and includes activities in the following areas: Public Safety, Public Works, Health and Social Services, Cultural and Recreational Activities, Community and Economic Development and General Government Administration. We present a balanced budget for General Fund in FY2013, with revenue and expenditures projected at $57.5 and $57.3 million, respectively. There are no new service initiatives with this budget. Transit Operations will be reclassified as a business-type activity outside of the General Fund as of July 1, 2012. This change is discussed more thoroughly in this budget’s transmittal letter and within the discussion of Transit Operations’ FY2013 budget highlights (page 270). A. General Fund Revenue FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 Actual Amended Adopted Projected Projected 1. Property Taxes 34,609,092 36,473,734 36,640,690 37,634,349 38,760,286 2. Other City Taxes 10,224,345 10,449,163 10,367,283 3,826,666 1,850,659 3. Licenses & Permits 1,408,811 1,211,428 1,435,534 1,435,534 1,435,534 4. Use Of Money & Property 137,422 114,396 158,714 158,714 158,714 5. Intergovernmental 3,393,060 3,855,983 2,642,643 2,608,634 2,594,870 6. Charges For Services 5,970,480 5,892,729 4,164,098 4,166,025 4,167,992 7. Miscellaneous 2,167,340 1,564,371 1,668,852 1,668,653 1,656,743 8. Other Financing Sources 1,538,165 2,037,286 387,614 393,940 400,484 Total Revenue:59,448,715$ 61,599,090$ 57,465,428$ 51,892,515$ 51,025,282$ % change from prior year 33.1%3.6%-6.7%-9.7%-1.7% - 77 - 1. Property Taxes - Property tax revenue of $36.6 million is the primary funding source for General Fund operations, providing an estimated sixty-four percent (64%) of total revenue in FY2013. There are a number of factors which determine the City’s tax levy each year: property valuations by class, the state’s annual Assessment Limitation Order (rollback), TIF district valuations and rebates, statutory limits on individual tax levies, the City’s own Financial and Fiscal Policies, restrictions from external entities on other financing sources and funding requirements for projected expenditures. 100% Assessment - Property valuations are set by the City and County Assessor. State law requires that all real property be reassessed every two years, specifically in odd-numbered years. Since 2002, valuations within the Iowa City corporate limits have increased an average of eight percent (8%) in revaluation years and three percent (3%) in non-revaluation years. Certified valuations reported by the Johnson County Auditor’s office for January 1, 2011 (a revaluation year), served as the basis for estimating property tax revenue in FY2013. Their report indicates a 2.08% increase in total assessed value from $4.43 billion to $4.53 billion in the last year. Assessment Limitation Order / Rollback - The State of Iowa has a statutory growth limitation of four percent (4%) annually on taxable property valuations by class (residential, commercial, industrial, etc). Each year, the Department of Revenue’s Assessment Limitation Order sets a ‘rollback’ value by class which, when applied, determines taxable valuations. An additional growth restriction is applied to the residential valuations, limiting growth in taxable value to agricultural valuations. In other words, the percentage change in taxable valuations for urban residential property each year is limited to either four percent (4%) or the growth in agricultural property, whichever is lower. The following graph illustrates the impact of the rollback on taxable valuations. In FY2004 the residential rollback exempted $.75 billion of Iowa City’s residential assessed valuation. In FY2013 the residential rollback will exempt $1.6 billion of residential assessed valuations. The rollback for FY2013 is 50.7518%, compared to 48.5299% for last year. This change amounts to an increase of 4.5% in taxable valuation. - 78 - Taxable Valuation - Iowa City’s aggregate taxable valuation for FY2013 has increased 4.25% for the debt service levy and 4.22% for operating levies over FY2012. 2. Other City Taxes – This category, estimated at $10.4 million in FY2013, includes local option sales tax revenue of $8.6 million, $740,000 in Hotel Motel Taxes, $411,000 in gas and electric excise taxes, and $578,000 in utility franchise taxes. a) Local Option Sales Tax: A one percent (1%) sales tax was approved by voter referendum on May 5, 2009, to provide funding for “remediation, repair and protection of flood-impacted public infrastructure”. Sales tax revenue is being receipted into the General Fund and transferred to the following capital projects designated by city Council as priorities under this definition: relocation of facilities at North Wastewater, elevation of North Dubuque Street and the reconstruction of Park Road Bridge. The sales tax went into effect on July 1, 2009 and sunsets on June 30, 2013. b) Hotel Motel Tax: This revenue source is a state-administered tax. Estimated at $740,000 in FY2013, the seven percent (7%) tax on gross hotel/motel room rental receipts is distributed as follows: Convention & Visitor's Bureau 25.00% Police Patrol 47.50% Parks & Recreational Facilities 27.50% Total Hotel Motel 7% Tax 100.00% - 79 - c) Utility Replacement Excise Tax: The Gas and Electric Excise tax is collected on the generation, distribution, and delivery of electricity and natural gas. This tax replaced the taxation on utility property in 1999. Cities are required to calculate property tax revenues with and without property valuations. The calculated difference is required to establish the General Property Tax Equivalents, the basis of the Iowa Department of Revenue distribution formula. d) Utility Franchise Taxes on utility customers: Senate File 478 was enacted by the Iowa state legislature during its 2009 session, establishing cities’ right to impose a franchise tax on gas and electric utilities. On February 16, 2010, the Iowa City Council passed and approved an ordinance establishing a one percent (1%) tax to be expended for the following purposes: 1) Inspecting, supervising and otherwise regulating the MidAmerican Energy Company’s gas and electric franchises. 2) Public safety, including the equipping of fire, police and emergency services. 3) Public infrastructure to support commercial and industrial economic development. Of the $853,000 estimate for FY2013, $578,000 will go to the City’s General Fund for maintenance of the right-of-way and operational costs associated with Fire Station #4. The remaining $275,000 is for recurring Capital Improvement Projects (CIP) in the right of way. 3. Licenses & Permits – This category consists of revenue received for building and rental housing permits/inspections, plumbing license and taxi license fees; beer, liquor and cigarette permit/license fees (state regulated), sign permits, burial permits, animal licensing and some miscellaneous fees. The FY2013 budget for Licenses and Permits is estimated at $1.4 million. The Housing Inspections Division has recommended an increase of 5% on rental inspections. 4. Use of Money & Property – This revenue source consists of interest income and is budgeted at $158,714 for FY2013. 5. Intergovernmental revenue is estimated at $2.6 million in FY2013, a reduction of $1.2 million in federal and state Transit operating grants. This revenue category includes state and federal grants, 28-E agreements, and contracts with local governmental entities. The majority of intergovernmental revenue is the result of 28E agreements with local entities for services provided to area residents, as shown in the following schedule. The largest of these agreements is for fire protection services to the University of Iowa, estimated at $1.6 million in FY2013, with $1.4 million receipted into the General Fund. The remainder is deposited into the Employee Benefits Fund as reimbursement for a percentage of Fire employee benefits. - 80 - FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 Intergovernmental Funding Actual Amended Adopted Projected Projected Local Governmental: 28E Agreements Coralville, Johnson County & Other Governments - Animal Services 65,712$ 92,500$ 122,001$ 122,001$ 122,001$ IC Comm. Schools - Mercer Pool 117,908 98,163 99,404 99,404 99,404 County, Univ Heights, Hills - Library 417,592 424,363 423,840 423,840 423,840 Johnson County - Senior Center*75,000 77,250 166,084 166,084 166,084 University Heights - Transit Services 32,844 33,279 - - - UI, County, Coralville Contribution Joint Public Safety Equipment Purchase 45,805 10,000 5,000 5,000 5,000 Local Governmental Revenue:754,861 735,555 816,329 816,329 816,329 State Revenue: Monies & Credits 25,352 13,000 13,000 13,000 13,000 Transit Assistance 503,330 355,099 - - - Transit - Federal Pass-thru 91,035 91,035 - - - Public Safety Grants 266,129 191,875 178,392 178,392 178,392 University of Iowa - Fire Protection 1,337,970 1,487,372 1,581,845 1,547,206 1,532,801 University of Iowa -Library Services 35,000 35,000 35,000 35,630 36,271 Total State Revenue:2,258,816 2,173,381 1,808,237 1,774,228 1,760,464 Federal Revenue: Transit FTA Operating Grants 181,023 904,110 - - - P ubl ic Safety Grants 27,405 40,137 17,203 17,203 17,203 FEMA Assistance / Reimbursements 159,224 - - - - Total Federal Revenue:367,652 944,247 17,203 17,203 17,203 Misc. Other Intergovernmental 11,731 2,800 874 874 874 Total - Intergovernmental Funding: 3,393,060$ 3,855,983$ 2,642,643$ 2,608,634$ 2,594,870$ *Note: Senior Center funding from Johnson County was proposed at $166,000 for FY2013, based on the percentage of members living outside of Iowa City's corporate limits. Subsequent to budget adoption, the Johnson County Board of Supervisors approved funding of $70,000. The FY2013 budget w ill be amended on July 1, 2012 to reflect this change. Senior Center staff are working with city administrators in order to identify other potential funding sources at this time. 6. Charges for Services are estimated at $4.2 million in FY2013. This revenue category is reduced by the exclusion of Transit revenues of $1.6 million. Included within this category is an administrative chargeback of $2.6 million to the City’s proprietary funds for services rendered by administrative divisions. Other divisions with fee-based services include: Parks and Recreation, Police (special events, contracted services), Fire (inspections), Housing & Inspection Services, Animal Care, and Cemetery services. 7. Miscellaneous Revenue - Miscellaneous revenue is estimated to receive $1.7 million in FY2013. This category includes a variety of revenue sources, including parking fines ($480,000), magistrate court fines and surcharges related to code enforcement ($391,000) and library fines ($212,000). - 81 - 8. Other Financing Sources include proceeds from the sale of assets, allocation of funds to equipment replacement reserves, and operating support from other funds for specific staff positions. The category is budgeted at $388,000 in FY2013. Transactions that occurred within this category in prior years include the following: capital project funding of $3.9 million to 420th Street industrial park from the General Fund cash balance. Also, $1.5 million for Fire Station #4 construction, this transaction and the remodeling of Fire Station #2 were financed by loans from the Landfill fund. Future years require the General Fund to repay annual principal and interest payments to the Landfill fund. B. GENERAL FUND EXPENDITURES FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 Actual Amended Adopted Projected Projected 1. Personnel 34,092,828 38,440,699 34,083,692 35,473,962 36,695,826 2. Services 8,881,362 9,845,103 7,823,727 8,040,831 7,929,906 3. Supplies 2,039,948 2,784,206 1,497,222 1,526,313 1,555,961 4. Capital Outlay 1,895,070 1,577,387 1,365,034 1,046,950 1,055,808 5. Transfers Out 3,635,447 28,156,340 12,144,393 5,540,843 3,599,968 6. Contingency - 362,638 337,500 337,500 337,500 Total Expenditures: 50,544,655 81,166,373 57,251,568 51,966,399 51,174,969 % Change 7.5% 60.6% -29.5% -9.2% -1.5% - 82 - 1. Personnel –Personnel costs account for approximately sixty percent (60%) of budgeted expenditures within the General Fund in FY2013. Total costs are $4.3 million less than last year due to the reclassification of Transit Operations and the return to 26 paydays per annum (versus 27 paydays in FY2012). Employee benefit costs are discussed in greater detail in this document’s transmittal letter. 2. Services – Expenditures for services are budgeted at $7.8 million in FY2013. Initial projections were based on FY2011 actual expenditures and projected at two percent (2%) annually. This is in line with the Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers (CPI-U) from May, 2012 (excluding food and energy), which indicates a 2.3% change in service expenditures from May, 2011. A number of operating costs within the services category have more specific inflationary guidelines and methods of projection. This includes funding for the self- insured Risk Management (Loss Reserve) Fund; liability, fire & casualty insurance premiums; professional and consultant services; internal service fund charges (Equipment, Information Technology Services, Risk Management, and Central Services); training & education; building and equipment repair and maintenance services; vehicle and equipment rentals. These costs are adjusted individually by year, based on specific operating plans and projects, claims/loss history, trend analysis, and operations-specific needs, by year. The Services category also includes funding for Community and Economic Development initiatives such as Aid to Human Service Agencies, Community Event Funding, support to the Iowa City Coralville Convention & Visitors Bureau, and Community and Economic Development Assistance, as follows: $276,173 Aid to Human Service Agencies $120,882 Community Event / Program Funding $186,382 ICCVB – Community / Economic Development Assistance $151,016 Economic Development Assistance Reclassification of Transit Operations reduced this category by $1.3 million in FY2013. When excluding Transit Operations from FY2012 expenditures for analytic purposes, the services expenditure category is up only half a percent (.5%) in FY2013. 3. Supplies - Supplies consist primarily of commodities that are consumed or depleted, such as office and cleaning supplies, vehicle fuel and materials for repair and maintenance of buildings, streets, and equipment. Individual items under $5,000 which may have been categorized as capital outlay in prior years are now budgeted within the supplies category for FY2012 and beyond. This adjustment is in line with the capitalization threshold utilized in the comprehensive annual financial report. 4. Capital Outlay – General Fund capital outlay is budgeted at $1.4 million in FY2013 and includes police vehicle replacements, library materials, operating equipment, and building maintenance and improvements of $5,000 or greater. - 83 - 5. Transfers Out – This category is budgeted at $9.3 million in FY2013. Transfers out include local option sales tax funding of $8.5 million for the Iowa City Gateway Project (Dubuque Street and Park Road Bridge). The FY2012 budget has carryover appropriation authority of $28.2 million. That includes project funding for the Iowa City Gateway Project in the amount of $9.2 million and project funding for the South Wastewater Plant Expansion in the amount of $12.6 million. These two projects utilize the one cent sales tax revenue for flood impacted infrastructure. Also in FY2012, there is a transfer of $3.8 million to the 420th Street Industrial Park and loan financing of $1.5 million for the construction of Fire Station #4. 6. Contingency – A General Fund contingency amount is established each fiscal year for those unforeseen expenditures that arise following formal adoption of the annual budget. This amount is available for reappropriation by formal amendment, subject to recommendation from the Finance Director and City Manager, and approval by City Council. Contingency is budgeted at ¾ of one percent (1%) of General Fund expenditures (excluding transfers) - approximately $337,500 in FY2013. C. FUND BALANCE It is part of the City’s Financial Reserves policy that General Fund’s unassigned fund balance not fall below fifteen percent (15%) of expenditures, with a ceiling of twenty- five percent (25%). During the FY2010 budget process, City Council further revised this policy, stating that fund balance in excess of twenty-five percent (25%) of expenditures could be considered for tax relief. In FY2012, $3.8 million of the unassigned balance was utilized to finance the 420th Street Industrial Park in lieu of a loan from the Landfill fund. General Fund’s unassigned fund balance is relied upon to provide cash flow during the first quarter of the fiscal year as the majority of property taxes are not received until October/November. The following chart demonstrates how expenditures have exceeded receipts in the first three months over the past ten years. 3 Months @ Sept. Receipts Expenditures Shortfall FY2012 12,090,490$ 15,441,933$ (3,351,443)$ FY2011 8,976,380 13,778,695 (4,802,315) FY2010 8,934,768 13,186,810 (4,252,042) FY2009 6,496,526 13,877,093 (7,380,567) FY2008 7,041,379 12,484,773 (5,443,394) FY2007 7,881,225 13,014,632 (5,133,407) FY2006 6,315,525 12,105,987 (5,790,462) FY2005 6,040,943 10,889,278 (4,848,334) FY2004 4,595,488 11,049,590 (6,454,102) FY2003 4,806,797 9,410,440 (4,603,643) - 84 - In February, 2009, the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) released GASB Statement No. 54, which redefines the terminology used for fund balance reporting. Following is a summary of General Fund balances utilizing the new definitions. FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 Actual Amended Adopted Projected Projected Unassigned:18,508,052$ 14,974,708$ 15,250,990$ 15,239,528$ 15,152,263$ Assigned: (Available for current and / or future operations) Fire Dept. Donations 500 500 500 500 500 Honor Guard Donation 1,054 1,054 1,054 1,054 1,054 Police Department Donations 1,448 1,448 1,448 1,448 1,448 Cemetery Flags & Flagpoles Program 1,212 1,212 1,212 1,212 1,212 4,215$ 4,215$ 4,215$ 4,215$ 4,215$ Committed: (Available for current and / or future operations) Library Equipment Replacement Reserve 103,721 123,175 142,629 162,083 181,537 Park Land Acquisition Reserve 185,733 185,733 185,733 185,733 185,733 Library Computer Replacement Reserve 97,564 140,532 183,500 226,468 269,436 Park Land Development Reserve 23,437 23,437 23,437 23,437 23,437 Transit Reserve: Grant & Levy Restrictions 1,920,703 - - - - Fire Equipment Replacement Reserve 487,207 487,207 487,207 487,207 487,207 2,818,365$ 960,084$ 1,022,506$ 1,084,928$ 1,147,350$ Restricted (Not available for general operations) Police Forfeiture Share 440,995 440,995 440,995 440,995 440,995 Local Option Sales Tax 14,050,814 - - - - Restricted Cash (Develop/Constr Escrows) 1,629,765 1,629,765 1,629,765 1,629,765 1,629,765 Restricted Fund Balance: (Forfeitures, Dev./Constr. Escrows)16,121,574$ 2,070,760$ 2,070,760$ 2,070,760$ 2,070,760$ General Fund Ending Fund Balance 37,452,206$ 18,009,766$ 18,348,470$ 18,399,430$ 18,374,587$ Unassigned Fund Balance as a % of Expenditures:37% 18% 27% 29% 30% General Fund Assigned, Committed & Restricted Fund Balance - 85 - - 86 - - 87 - - 88 - - 89 - - 90 - GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES PUBLIC SAFETY Police Animal Services Deer Control Fire Housing & Inspection Services F Y 2 0 1 3 Police Chief: Sam Hargadine Field Operations: Captain Rick Wyss Administrative Services: Captain Jim Steffen Administrative Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone (Front desk/non-emergency): (319) 356-5275 MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The mission of the Iowa City Police Department is to protect the rights of all persons within its jurisdiction to be free from crime, to be secure in their possessions, and to live in peace. By pursuing the goals of education, prevention and enforcement, it is the primary objective of the Iowa City Police Department to pursue the ideal of a community free from crime and disorder in a fair, responsive, collaborative and professional manner. The Police Department’s goals further the City’s strategic plan goals of: Neighborhood Stabilization, Planning and Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas, and Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation. OBJECTIVES 1. Addressing the downtown bar scene, neighborhood house parties and the related underage drinking and intoxication related offenses. 2. Minimizing the effects of gangs and drugs on the community. 3. Establishing strategies to free up officer time for increasing Community Policing presence. 4. Effectively utilize the new Juvenile Investigator that was added to the Investigations Unit to address growing problems related to juvenile crime. POLICE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 91 - PERFORMANCE MEASURES* 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total PAULA Arrests (Objective #1) 1002 879 852 529 Total DUI Arrests (Objective #1) 486 424 419 319 Total Violent Crimes (Objective #2) 253 259 247 188 Total Property Crimes (Objective #2) 1526 1688 1575 1541 Number of Officers (Objective #3) 73 72 74 80 Total Juvenile Violent Crime Arrests (Objective #4) 9 16 15 Not available Total Juvenile Property Crime Arrests (Objective #4) 114 118 96 Not available *A full performance measure report is available in Appendix A of this document. FY 2012 HIGHLIGHTS This past year saw a couple of major projects come to fruition. For years the police department has needed to move its evidence storage from the basement of the Wilson Building due to deteriorating conditions. Mold and rodents were a constant problem and space is limited within the Police Department. For at least five years we have relocated our evidence storage in the basement of the Water Treatment Facility. Knowing that this is a temporary solution it gives us time to participate in a space needs study and lobby for new quarters for future expansion. The second project was the completion of the Joint Emergency Communications Center (JECC) where two 911 answering centers were merged into one state of the art dispatching center. The police department lost 12 communication dispatch employees, but gained five Station Master positions that run the front desk operation 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Major ordinance revisions occurred during this year. A juvenile curfew was enacted by the City Council and a “21 Only” bar ordinance was enacted also by council and later upheld by the voting citizens. Both of these ordinances have had a favorable impact on the quality of life in Iowa City. Citizen involvement and organized neighborhoods contributed greatly as well. - 92 - Police Chief of Police ADMINISTRATION 1 Police Captain 1 Sergeant 1 Administrative Secretary 1 Computer Systems Analyst CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 1 Lieutenant 1 Sergeant 8 Police Officers RECORDS & IDENTIFICATION 1 Police Sergeant 1 Records Supervisor 2 Senior Records Clerks 2 Records Clerks PATROL 1 Captain 3 Lieutenants 6 Sergeants 53 Police Officers 4 Community Service Officers 1 Community Service Officer - Evidence CRIME PREVENTION 1 Crime Prevention Officer STATIONMASTER 5 CSO/Station Masters GRANTS 1 Domestic Violence Grant Police Officer 1 Jo. County Task Force Grant Officer ANIMAL SERVICES 1 Animal Control Supervisor 2 Animal Services Officers 1 Animal Care Assistant 2 Animal Care Technicians - 93 - - 94 - DEPARTMENT: POLICE DIVISION: ADMINISTRATION DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Police Department’s administration division is responsible for oversight of police computer and technology systems, property and evidence, training and accreditation, planning and research and the following operating budgets:  Patrol  Criminal Investigations  Records & Identification  Station Master  School Crossing Guards  Training Intervention Procedures (TIPS) & Citizens Police Academy  Johnson County Task Force Grant  Domestic Violence Grant  Animal Services Computer and Technology Systems: One civilian employee is tasked with the responsibility for the police information technology, CAD system support, records integration and technology for the Police Department. This includes wireless solutions and communication upgrades and the day to day support of all police computer hardware and software both in the station and mobile applications in the field. He is responsible to coordinate preparation, testing and implementation of computer programs and systems for department operations, assists in development of computer applications for the police department, coordinates computer usage, training, hardware and software maintenance and implementation, acts as liaison and interfaces with other city/outside agencies. He is also responsible to formulate computer system requirements and procedures for processing data, analyzes existing procedures and information requirements for computer applications, troubleshoots computer hardware and software problems and other police-related technology problems and determines the appropriate corrective action. This position maintains inventories, orders specialized computer supplies and equipment and provides computer training and education for department staff as required. Additionally, he participates in intra-governmental and - 95 - intergovernmental teams to evaluate technology-related projects, monitors systems use, participates in professional development to remain current on computer and other technology innovations and makes recommendations as needed. Property and Evidence: Property and Evidence maintain all property turned in to the department, including found property and that which is held for evidentiary purposes. Evidentiary items are prepared by staff for transport to applicable lab facilities, carefully recording the disposition of property when it is removed from the department. Staff is also responsible for the return and final disposition of the property. Training and Accreditation: This position is responsible for coordinating, documenting, and developing all the training for the Iowa City Police Department. Another large portion of his duties is to oversee the review of current general orders and the generation of new orders as part of the CALEA Accreditation process. Planning and Research: Staff assigned to Planning and Research provide analysis of statistical information in order to identify trends in the community. This helps determine how departmental resources are best deployed. Planning and Research also ensures the integrity of departmental documentation, and serves as the Media Public Information Officer. - 96 - - 97 - DEPARTMENT: POLICE DEPARTMENT DIVISION: PATROL DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Personnel assigned to patrol operations are responsible for responding to calls for service and in-progress crimes. The officers assigned to the Uniform Patrol section carry out these duties year round, around the clock. Additionally, they participate in proactive patrol, enforce applicable laws, and are responsible for providing the community a point of contact for events which occur within their assigned area or “beat”. Officers assigned to the Patrol section are assigned to a specific watch, which is generally an eight-hour block of time during which the officer carries out their duties. The beat to which the officers are assigned is determined by the Watch Commander, who holds the rank of Lieutenant, and Field Supervisors, who hold the rank of Sergeant. Once officers are assigned to a beat, they are generally responsible for providing a police response to all incidents which occur in that beat during their watch. Beat officers are expected to establish or enhance communication between the Department and those residents, business employees, school officials and others within their beat so that the Department can be responsive to concerns. The beat officer is truly the “face of the Department” for many residents. Within the patrol unit, Officers are selected to receive specialized training, to including a Special Response Team, Crisis Negotiation Team, two K9 Units, one member on the Johnson County Metro Bomb Team, Field Training Officers and Crime Scene Technicians. Revenue: While the majority of the Patrol Division’s revenue comes from General Levy property taxes, the Division does receive revenue from the reimbursement of costs associated with special events, the hotel/motel tax, and a small number of grants. The revenue generated from special event contracted patrol services is typically associated with events that require street closure; these revenues are reflected in cost center 421240. - 98 - - 99 - DEPARTMENT: POLICE DEPARTMENT DIVISION: CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIONS DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The investigation unit is comprised of thirteen sworn officers, a sergeant and a lieutenant. The Unit’s primary function is to provide support to the Patrol Division by following through on investigations and complaints initially answered by uniformed officers. Police Investigations was established to solve crimes through the questioning victims, witnesses and suspects, accumulating physical evidence at the scene of a crime and by tracing stolen property or vehicles associated with a crime. There are six general investigators who focus on financial crimes, sex crimes, assaults, crimes against people and property crimes. These investigators have received specialized training in a number of areas including; sex crimes, processing crime scenes, homicides, and financial crimes. One officer is assigned as a computer and other electronic forensics investigator. This investigator works on cultivating evidence from electronic equipment that has been seized, assists with crimes that are perpetrated over the internet, and works with the Iowa Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force to counter the emerging threat of offenders using the internet or other online technology to exploit children. One officer is assigned as a juvenile investigator. This investigator follows up leads on cases that involve juvenile victims and suspects. They work closely with the Iowa City Community School District, Juvenile Court, Department of Human Services, and the County Attorney’s office through all phases of cases involving juveniles. Three officers are assigned to the Street Crimes Action Team (SCAT). SCAT investigators continue to operate under the mission and philosophy of engaging in the proactive investigation and enforcement of street level criminal and narcotic investigations. The unit assumes additional responsibilities of investigating crimes of violence such as home invasions, robberies, weapon violations, gang activity, as well as a providing for a rapid response to problem locations which may require a sustained operation to reach successful resolution. - 100 - - 101 - - 102 - - 103 - - 104 - - 105 - - 106 - - 107 - DEPARTMENT: POLICE DEPARTMENT DIVISION: GRANTS DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Johnson County Drug Task Force Grant: One officer is assigned as a narcotics investigator. They investigate drug trafficking and assist in drug overdose death investigations. They are a member of the Johnson County Drug Task Force and the Cedar Rapids DEA task force. This investigator works closely with State and Federal agencies. The position of the narcotics investigator is partially paid through the Governor’s Office on Drug Control Policy (ODCP) from the federally funded Byrne-JAG grant. The statistics generated through this grant are reported to the ODCP on a monthly basis. The grant also requires a semi-annual and annual report, along with a yearly audit and onsite inspection. Domestic Violence Grant: One officer is assigned as the domestic violence investigator. They follow up with victims whose perpetrator meets the definition of a domestic partner under the state code. This investigator works closely with the Domestic Violence Intervention Program and the Rape Victim Advocacy Program. This is funded in part from a grant received from the US Department of Justice, Office on Violence Against Women, which is administered by the Iowa Crime Victim Assistance Division of the Iowa Attorney General’s Office. The domestic violence investigator also is required to make monthly, quarterly and annual reports to the state on the cases that are reported. - 108 - - 109 - DEPARTMENT: POLICE DEPARTMENT DIVISION: ANIMAL SERVICES MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS Protect the health and safety of the public and animals through the enforcement of local and state laws. Operate a facility that embodies best practice standards in the humane treatment and housing of all animals in our care. Reduce euthanasia by promoting responsible pet care of all animals through education, progressive animal placement programs, and compassionate accessible population control resources. Provide programs and services that engage the public with the animal shelter community. Maintain a high standard of integrity, commitment, compassion and professionalism. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Field Enforcement: The division’s two animal service officers, under the direction of the supervisor, are responsible for ensuring public health and safety through the enforcement of laws and ordinances which pertain to animals, issuance of licenses and permits for the keeping of animals both privately and commercially, investigation of animal neglect and cruelty including animal fighting, management of urban wildlife, the capture of stray domestic pets, livestock and exotic animals, and the quarantine of biting animals. Officers are also involved in public education throughout the community and within the Iowa City school district with regard to responsible care of animals, bite prevention, zoonotic disease prevention, and population control. Officers respond to service requests within Iowa City and contracted jurisdictions within Johnson County. Animal Care and Adoption Center: The Iowa City Animal Care and Adoption Center is operated by the Animal Services division for the purpose of housing and caring for stray and abandoned animals throughout the Johnson County area. The Center houses approximately 125 animals per day. Two Animal Care Technicians (ACT’s) and two temporary kennel assistants, under the direction of the supervisor, are responsible for the daily care and cleaning of all animals and holding areas, medical treatments, screening tests, exercise of animals, evaluation of temperament, and record keeping for each individual animal. Animal Care Technicians work directly with the public, assisting them with information about animals available for adoption. - 110 - One Animal Center Assistant and one temporary Center Assistant under the direction of the supervisor are responsible for office functions including the sale of animal licenses, permits, dog park tags, data input, preparation of adoption documents, statistical documentation for regional billing, and public relations. Facility Replacement and Local Animal Service Agreements: The City is currently in the process of replacing the Animal Care and Adoption Center that was irreparably damaged during the flood of 2008. The Division currently operates out of a temporary facility on Sand Road. The new facility, to be constructed on Napoleon Lane, is slated to be funded through a combination of FEMA and State reimbursements, City funds, private donations, and contributions from local jurisdictions that will participate financially in the ongoing operation of the facility. CIP funds budgeted for FY 2012 will be carried forward to fund this facility, which is in the design process and is projected to be completed during FY 2015. The service area and exact size of the facility remain unknown as of the printing of this budget; agreements with local jurisdictions that will contract with the City for animal services are being finalized. Non-recurring CIP project impact on operating costs: It is not expected that the new facility will substantially affect the Division’s operating costs. When the new facility becomes operational, the Division will no longer budget for the temporary facility lease payments. No staffing changes are expected. Animal Services Animal Center Assistant 2 Animal Care Technicians 2 Animal Services Officers Animal Control Supervisor - 111 - - 112 - - 113 - Fire Chief: Andy Rocca Deputy Fire Chief: Roger Jensen Administrative Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone (Administration/non-emergency): (319) 356-5260 DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Iowa City Fire Department is dedicated to providing the community progressive, high quality emergency and preventive services. Sixty-four full-time firefighters provide fire, medical, technical rescue, and hazardous materials emergency response to approximately 68,000 residents in the 24.4 square-mile incorporated area of Iowa City, including the University of Iowa main campus. The department operates from four fire stations and staffs four engine companies, one truck company, and a command vehicle. The Iowa City Fire Department collaborates with many other fire protection agencies at the local, state, and federal levels. Specialty areas include: Fire Investigations, the Johnson County Hazardous Materials Response Team, Special Operations Response Team, and Homeland Security and Emergency Management. The department is organized into four functional program areas: Administration and Support, Fire Prevention, Fire Emergency Operations, and Fire Training and FIRE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 114 - Equipment. The Administration and Support Division is under the direction of the Fire Chief. The Fire Chief is responsible for all department activities as set out by Federal or State laws, and City ordinances. The Fire Chief reports to the City Manager. The Deputy Fire Chief is the second in command officer in the department and is responsible for homeland security initiatives, fire service accreditation, the maintenance and purchase computer hardware and software, and other special projects. The Battalion Chief assigned to the Administration and Support Division is responsible for maintenance of buildings and grounds, calendar administration, the Health & Safety Committee, uniforms, physicals and immunizations. The Administrative Secretary performs a wide variety of office- related duties to include: office receptionist, personnel transactions, payroll, bill processing, and maintaining office supplies and office machines. The Fire Prevention Bureau is staffed by a Battalion Chief assigned as Fire Marshal and as such reports to the Deputy Fire Chief. The Fire Marshal is directly responsible for organizing all fire prevention activities, including fire/arson investigation, code enforcement inspections, and public education. A shift fire inspector conducts inspections of liquor license establishments, schools, day care centers, churches, and City buildings. Emergency operations personnel conduct fire safety inspections of all commercial and University of Iowa buildings. The Fire Emergency Operations Division works a three-shift system. Each duty shift is comprised of 24 hours and consists of one Battalion Chief, one Captain, four Lieutenants, and 14 Firefighters. Minimum staffing for the department is 16 emergency response personnel. This division is directl y responsible for all emergency incident response including: fire suppression, emergency medical responses, hazardous materials responses, and technical rescue. The Training and Equipment Division is under the direction of the assigned Battalion Chief and the Training Officer. They plan, develop, and coordinate in- house training activities with the assistance of the Training Committee. This division is directly responsible for training in the areas of emergency medical services, technical rescue, fire suppression, and hazardous materials; The Division is also responsible for purchasing tools, equipment, radios, protective clothing; and purchase and repair of fire apparatus. In addition to responding to over 4,400 emergency incidents annually, the Iowa City Fire Department provides proactive prevention services, such as fire safety inspections of commercial and University properties, site plan reviews, and fire - 115 - and environmental safety education. The department’s community-driven strategic plan for fire protection services will guide the department’s path into the future. The department attained accredited agency status through the Commission on Fire Accreditation International in 2008. The department Training Center is a regional facility that articulates with the Iowa Fire Service Training Bureau, Kirkwood Community College, and the Johnson County Mutual Aid Association. Iowa City Fire Department community projects include: fire safety education, fire station tours, juvenile firesetters intervention, a mobile fire safe house, a mobile fire sprinkler trailer, ride-along program, the Safety Village, and is a co-leader with Mercy Hospital of the Johnson County SAFE KIDS Coalition. MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The mission of the Iowa City Fire Department is to protect our community by providing progressive, high quality emergency and preventive services. The Fire Department’s strategic plan and annual goals directly support the City’s strategic plan goals of Neighborhood Stabilization and Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation. OBJECTIVES 1. Improve emergency response times through data analysis and continuous improvement 2. Protect the community through fire prevention programs and services 3. Respond to emergency calls for service (fire, medical, haz-mat, and technical rescue) 4. Conduct individual, company, shift, and department training 5. Maintain facilities, apparatus, and equipment 6. Update the Fire Department FY2011-2016 Strategic Plan Performance Measures: A full performance measure report is available in Appendix A of this document, in addition to the measures presented below. - 116 - PERFORMANCE MEASURES 2008 2009 2010 2011 Average Response Time, Fire Incident (Objective #1) 5:34 5:43 5:30 4:48 Average Response Time, Non-Fire Incident (Objective #1) 5:53 5:23 6:10 4:52 Structure/Non-structure Fires per 1000 Population (Objective #2) 2.61 2.55 2.62 2.50 Total Structure Fires (Objective #2) 77 59 85 72 Total Non-Structure Fires (Objective #2) 100 114 93 100 Total Residential Structure Fires (Objective #2) 57 42 62 51 Total 1 or 2 Family Residential Structure Fires (Objective #2) 17 20 24 23 Total Commercial Fires (Objective #2) 69 87 79 88 Total Industrial Fires (Objective #2) 1 2 3 5 Non-Fire incidents per 1000 Population (Objective #3) 60.20 58.75 63.29 65.07 Total Non-Fire Incidents (Objective #3) 4,080 3,982 4,295 4,470 Sworn Firefighters per 1000 Population .82 .82 .82 .93 - 117 - Fire Department Administration Fire Chief Support Services Admin Secretary Administration / Special Projects Deputy Fire Chief Shift A 1.0 Captain 4.0 Lieutenants 14.0 Firefighters Shift B 1.0 Captain 4.0 Lieutenants 14.0 Firefighters Training Officer / Lieutenant Fire Prevention Battalion Chief/Fire Marshall Training/ Equipment Battalion Chief (56 hrs/wk) Emergency Operations Battalion Chief (56 hrs/wk) Administration/ Support Battalion Chief (56 hrs/wk) Shift C 1.0 Captain 4.0 Lieutenants 14.0 Firefighters - 118 - - 119 - - 120 - Housing and Inspection Services Director: Doug Boothroy Senior Building Inspector: Tim Hennes Senior Housing Inspector: Stan Laverman Housing Administrator: Steve Rackis Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5120 DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Housing and Inspections Services Department (HIS) includes the following General Fund cost centers: HIS Administration, Building Inspection, and Housing Inspection. The Iowa City Housing Authority, also part of HIS, is funded with federal grants and shown separately here for this reason. The Building Inspection Division enforces a number of codes and ordinances which relate to new construction and the maintenance of existing structures in order to protect the health and safety of the general public, and is entirely supported by permit and inspection-related fees. The division issues building permits for new construction, additions, alterations and repairs, sign and professional permits including mechanical, plumbing, fire sprinkler, and alarms. All building site plans are reviewed and inspections are conducted to ensure safe and proper construction in adherence with code. The division also enforces zoning ordinances and responds to complaints of nuisance- related ordinance violations. The Housing Inspection Division inspects more than 16,780 rental units annually, working with property owners, managers, and tenants to ensure conformance with the Iowa City Housing Code. Code language establishes minimum health and safety standards considered necessary to protect and promote the welfare of tenants and the general public. The division also enforces zoning ordinances and responds to complaints of nuisance-related ordinance violations. The Iowa City Housing Authority (ICHA) acts as a community leader for affordable housing, family self-sufficiency, and homeownership opportunities. We provide: Information & Education, Housing Assistance, Public & Private partnership opportunities. The funding for all inspection services is projected to come from permit and inspection fees in FY2013. HOUSING & INSPECTION SERVICES DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 121 - MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The department is responsible for enforcing a broad range of public health and safety regulations (i.e., zoning, nuisance, building codes, rental housing, environmental, etc.) to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the general public. In addition, the department is responsible for providing affordable housing opportunities through the Housing Choice Voucher, Public Housing, and Homeownership programs. The Housing and Inspection Services Department goals further the City’s strategic plan goals of: Neighborhood Stabilization, Economic and Community Development, and Planning and Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas. OBJECTIVES 1. The inspection of all rental properties located in the City on a two year cycle. 2. Administration and compliance of the codes and ordinances adopted by the City of Iowa City that regulate buildings and properties located in the City. 3. Ensure that those individuals and companies that do business in the City meet the regulatory standards set forth in the building code and local ordinances for business and occupation in which they are operating. 4. Investigating and resolving housing and nuisance complaints for all properties. 5. Maintain a 90% lease-up rate (100% for the 5 1-bedroom and 4 2-bedroom units) for the Peninsula Apartments. PERFORMANCE MEASURES* 2008 2009 2010 Active Rental Permits (Objective #1) 3,584 3,658 3,768 Percent of Rental Voluntary Compliance (Objective #1) 98.5% 98% 98.6% Building Permits Issued (Objective #2) 889 704 779 Construction Permits Issued (Objective #2) 2,945 2,172 2,384 Zoning/Nuisance Complaints (Objective #4) 2,026 2,053 2,140 Housing Authority Federal Revenue $6,307,111 $6,643,329 $7,793,433 Housing Authority Rental Revenue (Objective #5) $145,438 $179,485 $180,311 * A full performance measure report is available in Appendix A of this document. - 122 - Administration Iowa City Housing Authority Building Inspection Housing & Inspection Services Housing Inspection - 123 - DEPARTMENT: HOUSING & INSPECTION SERVICES DIVISION: ADMINISTRATION MISSION STATEMENT Support departmental divisions (i.e., Housing Authority, Building Inspection, and Housing Inspection) to provide high quality, proactive services and programs that protect and enhance the quality of life for all citizens through opportunities for affordable housing (i.e., Section 8 Rental Assistance Program, Public Housing, and Homeownership) and the equitable, timely, and effective enforcement of land use regulations (i.e., zoning, nuisance, rental housing, building codes, etc.) while conserving the integrity of neighborhoods. OBJECTIVES  Assist all department divisions in meeting their objectives.  Provide a higher degree of supervisory, administrative and professional development and performance by all division heads.  Complete all assigned projects and schedules prescribed by the City Manager.  Promote customer service as the mission for everyone in the department. FY2013 HIGHLIGHTS The FY2013 budget includes a $28.00 electronic plat submission fee to go into effect July 1, 2012. - 124 - - 125 - DEPARTMENT: HOUSING & INSPECTION SERVICES DIVISION: HOUSING INSPECTION MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The mission of the Housing Inspection Division is to ensure the housing facilities are of the quality necessary to protect and promote the health, safety, and welfare of not only those persons utilizing these facilities, the general public as well. We strive to achieve these goals and contribute to the overall mission of the City by:  The inspection of all rental properties located in the City on a two year cycle.  The inspection of all housing related to the Housing Authority’s Housing Choice Voucher Program.  Investigating and resolving housing and nuisance complaints for all properties. OBJECTIVES  Continue to monitor all available resources to find over-occupies rentals and properties rented without permits.  Expand pro-active neighborhood code enforcement efforts.  Increase the use of technology to allow for in-the-field case entry and reporting.  Increase the use of e-mail to send inspection reports and rental permits to property managers and owners. Revenue: The Housing Inspection Division does not receive property tax support. The majority of the Division’s revenue comes from rental permit fees. Projections for FY 2013 are based on FY 2011 actual receipts. Staff estimates a two and one- half (2.5%) increase in permitting activity due to increased enforcement in FY 2011 and FY 2012. A five percent (5%) fee increase was recommended by staff and approved by City Council for rental inspections effective July 1, 2012. - 126 - Beginning in FY 2009, rental housing inspections began operating on a two-year cycle. Previously, inspections occurred on a three-year cycle. Consequently, inspection revenue increases every other budget year. Future odd-numbered budget years will reflect higher revenues from rental housing inspections, while even-numbered years will show lower inspection revenues. Housing Assistant (.75) Housing Inspector Assistant (.70) Housing Inspectors (3.0) . Housing/Development Reg. Inspector (.50) Housing Inspections Senior Housing Inspector - 127 - - 128 - DEPARTMENT: HOUSING & INSPECTION SERVICES DIVISION: BUILDING INSPECTION MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The mission of the Building Inspection Division is to promote the general health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of Iowa City by assisting citizens with the code and permit process, by working with developers and contractors in achieving their goals, and by working with other City departments for a coordinated effort. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES We strive to achieve these goals and contribute to the overall mission of the City by:  Administration and compliance of the codes and ordinances adopted by the City of Iowa City that regulate buildings and properties located in the City.  Provide information to the public and to assist them in understanding and the application of the adopted codes and ordinances.  Ensure that those individuals and companies that do business in the City meet the regulatory standards set forth in the building code and local ordinances for business and occupation in which they are operating. Objectives specific to the coming year include the following:  Adopted the 2012 International Codes: o Review new requirement to protect lightweight construction materials. o Review requirement to install fire suppression in all newly constructed homes.  Monitor State Electrical Code adoption and verify local electrical code compliance.  Conduct ongoing analysis for improved service delivery. - 129 -  Monitor state trade licensing requirements and verify local trade licensing is compliant.  Update of technology to increase efficiency and enhance customer service. o Allow electronic submittals of plan documents. o Scanning of subdivisions files to make accessible electronically. o Activate process to allow inspection activities to be e-mailed to clients after each inspection. Revenue: The Building Inspection Division does not receive property tax support. The vast majority of the Division’s revenue comes from permit and plan review fees. FY 2013 revenue projections are based on FY 2011 actual receipts. These projections are subject to change, based on the number of construction permits issued and building inspections conducted. Actual revenues will respond to the level of development in the community. Housing Inspector Assistant (.30) 5 Building Inspectors Development Reg. Specialist . Housing/Development Reg. Inspector (.50) Building Inspections Senior Building Inspector - 130 - - 131 - - 132 - GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES PUBLIC WORKS Public Works Administration Engineering F Y 2 0 1 3 Public Works Director: Rick Fosse City Engineer: Ron Knoche Wastewater Superintendent: Dave Elias Streets/Solid Waste Superintendent: Bud Stockman Water Superintendent: Ed Moreno Equipment Superintendent: Tom Hansen Administrative Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone (Public Information): (319) 356-5164 PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 133 - MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The Iowa City Public Works Department exists to provide the essential infrastructure and services necessary for the health, safety, and welfare of our community. These services will be provided in a manner that will enhance the quality of life of our citizens today and for generations to come. The Public Works Department strives to further the City’s strategic plan goals of: Economic and Community Development, Planning and Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas, and Neighborhood Stabilization. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Public Works Department provides oversight for the following operating budgets:  Administration  Engineering  Streets Division (Road Use Tax Fund)  Wastewater Treatment  Water  Refuse Collection  Landfill  Stormwater Management  Equipment Administration and Engineering are General Fund accounts and funded primarily through property tax revenue. The Streets Division is funded by Road Use Tax, as found within the Special Revenue Fund section of this budget. Utility operations (Water, Wastewater, Refuse, Stormwater) and Landfill are supported by user fees and are therefore found within the Business-Type Activities section of this budget. The Equipment Division operates as an Internal Service Fund. - 134 - Public Works Department Water Streets / Solid Waste Superintendent Road Use Tax: Streets Division (Special Revenue Fund) Solid Waste and Recycling Wastewater Superintendent Wastewater Landfill City Engineer Engineering (General Fund) Stormwater Equipment (Internal Service Fund) Business-Type Funds (unless otherwise noted) Administration (General Fund) Public Works Director - 135 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: ADMINISTRATION DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Public Works Department is comprised of six divisions which operate from various locations throughout the city. These divisions include: Administration, Engineering, Streets, Equipment, Wastewater / Landfill, and Water. Engineering provides direction to the Stormwater Management program and Streets provides oversight to Refuse Collection. - 136 - - 137 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: ENGINEERING MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The Engineering Division exists to provide the technical expertise for the design and construction management of public infrastructure to enhance the quality of life of our citizens. The Division also manages the public right-of-way to maintain the health, safety, and welfare of our community, and operates the stormwater utility. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Engineering Division performs work in connection with all municipal public works improvements including bridges, roads, sanitary sewers, and stormwater systems. Engineering staff review subdivision plans, design public works improvement projects, perform survey work, and inspect the construction of public works projects and subdivision improvements. - 138 - Design/Engineering Senior Engineers (2) Architectural Services/ Energy Coordinator (1) Civil Engineers (2) Survey Party Chief (1) Senior Engineering Technician (1) Engineering Technician (0.1) City Engineer Construction/Inspection Senior Construction Inspector (1) Construction Inspector II (2) (Capital Improvement Funds) Right-of-Way (ROW) Management Utilities Technician (1) Stormwater Management See Business Type Funds Engineering Services - 139 - - 140 - GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES CULTURE & RECREATION Library Parks & Recreation Forestry Central Business District Cemetery / Perpetual Care Government Buildings Senior Center F Y 2 0 1 3 Library Director: Susan Craig Location: 123 S. Linn St. Phone: (319) 356-5200 DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Iowa City Public Library is the busiest public library building in the state of Iowa. On an average, over 220 people enter the building every hour and an average of over 4,300 things are checked out each day. Five public meeting rooms are booked more than 2,200 times a year for a variety of community uses. Programs for children are offered almost every day and in house computer and wireless use is over 200,000 per year. Online access at www.icpl.org makes collections and information available 24/7. The Library is governed by a semi-autonomous nine-member board of trustees; which is empowered by state law and city ordinance to set policy, determine goals and objectives, direct the use of monies appropriated or gifted to the Library, and to employ staff. Services are offered to residents of Iowa City and, through contract, residents of University Heights, Hills, and rural Johnson County. Reciprocal agreements with other public libraries across Iowa provide for a sharing of services through the Open Access Program. LIBRARY DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 141 - Revenue: Eighty-four percent (84%) of funding comes from Iowa City tax support which includes a voter approved .27 levy (per $1,000 taxable valuation). Other major funding sources include contracts for service, library fines, gifts, and building rent. Approximately 8% of the Library’s revenue comes from service agreements with other governmental jurisdictions; most of this consists of a contract for service with Johnson County. Another 4% of the Library’s revenue comes from fines and fees. Staffing changes: In FY12, there was no net change in staffing at ICPL. However, positions were adjusted following a retirement to strengthen efforts in the area of communications, a city-wide priority. MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The Iowa City Public Library is an innovative and responsive community center that supports lifelong learning, literacy, and access to the world of ideas. The Library values and is committed to: intellectual freedom, excellence in customer service, community building, working collaboratively, minimizing barriers to use, providing a welcoming environment, and a well-trained staff. The Library’s goals further the City’s strategic plan goals of: Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation and Planning and Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas. OBJECTIVES 1. Making the Library easier to use and more accessible. 2. Improving visibility and awareness of Library services, programs and collections. 3. Developing partnerships that build community and support the Library’s mission. 4. Providing resources that inform, entertain and enrich. - 142 - PERFORMANCE MEASURES* 2007 2008 2009 2010 Library Visits (Objective #1) 680,568 716,412 745,077 746,556 Registered Borrowers (Objective #2) 64,141 65,786 66,539 67,892 Circulation per Capita (Objective #2) 20.91 21.61 22.49 22.30 Children’s Program Attendance (Objective #4) 34,777 29,468 26,461 25,802 Public Internet Uses (Objective #4) 134,888 132,080 131,300 123,636 * A full performance measure report is available in Appendix A of this document. Did You Know? In 2012 The Iowa City Public Library was named one of the Top 5 Children’s Libraries by Livability.com. In 2009, Iowa City was named the third UNESCO City of Literature. There are currently five cities in the world who share this distinction; Iowa City is the only one in the western hemisphere. - 143 - Access1.0 Coo2.0 Sen Ass1.0 Libr3.25 Librs Services ordinator nior Library sistant rary Assistant I rary Clerk Children’s Ser1.0 Coordinator2.0 Librarian II 2.10 Library AssiIDevelopme1.0 Director of D(funded by IFoundation)0.5 Library Assistrvicesr istant III Colle1.01.01.01.03.25Iowa CityLibraryLient Office Development CPL Friends ) tant III ection ServicesCoordinator Senior Library Assistant Library Assistant IIILibrary Assistant IILibrary Clerk y Public Ly Board of Trustibrary Director 1.0 Director Community 1.0 Coordin2.0 Libraria0.65 PR Spe0.75 Senior Assista1.63 Library 0.5 Library Library tees Services nator an II ecialist Library ant Assistant III Assistant I 1111IT Services 1.0 Coordinator 1.0 Microcomputer Specialist 1.0 Network DatabaSpecialist 1.0 Web SpecialistAdministrative1.0 Administrative 1.0 Library AssistaFacilities S1.0 Library Buildin1.0 Maintenance W0.5 Maintenance W2.0 Custodian ase RefIns1.0 C1.0 S3.0 Li0.5 Li e Services Coordinator ant I Services g Manager Worker II Worker I ference & struction oordinator enior Librarian ibrarian II ibrary Assistant III- 144 - - 145 - - 146 - - 147 - Parks and Recreation Director: Mike Moran Parks Superintendent: Terry Robinson Recreation Superintendent: Chad Dyson Administrative Office Location: 220 S. Gilbert St. Phone: (319) 356-5110 MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS Provide a high-quality level of leisure time opportunities, increase the number of people served, improve the quality of program delivery, and advocate the benefits of recreational involvement to the general public. We strive to enhance the quality of life for residents of Iowa City by providing cost effective quality programs and services, facilities, parks, open spaces, and information as an essential link in creating a dynamic, vital community. PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 148 - The goals of the Parks and Recreation Department further the City’s strategic plan goals of: Neighborhood Stabilization, Planning and Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas, and Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation. OBJECTIVES  Maximize the planning process  Track performance measures  Enhance program development  Pursue comprehensive service delivery  Solicit community involvement and feedback  Increase awareness of program offerings  Assure financial sustainability  Collaborate with community organizations and businesses  Continue to provide equitable level of service in existing parks and facilities  Plan for continued equitable level of service as community grows  Increase level of service for trails Parks & Recreation Cemetery Recreation Government Buildings Central Business District (CBD) Parks Operation & Maintenance Forestry Administration - 149 - - 150 - DEPARTMENT: PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION: PARKS DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Parks Division oversees maintenance of the following City-owned assets:  1,506 acres of parkland and open/green space  43 designated parks  45 outdoor shelters  31 playground structures  14 restroom facilities Daily staff responsibilities include visiting all designated parks, cleaning and securing restroom facilities and providing for trash removal. Other regular duties include the following:  Park Shelters: Staff is responsible for shelter cleaning, preparation, maintenance and repair. Annual repair and maintenance includes siding, roofs, plumbing, windows and doors; painting, concrete work, and construction of building additions to any or all of these facilities. There were 1,108 shelter reservations in 2011.  Mowing: Scheduled mowing includes 486 acres of residential-style turf, and 212 acres of rough areas along highways and in water retention areas. Efforts are also made to remove invasive vegetation when possible.  Snow and ice removal: Access roads, parking areas, 27.4 miles of trails and sidewalks and the City Park ice skating area, are maintained during winter months, weather permitting.  Repair of park fixtures: Fixtures such as picnic tables (350) and garbage racks (250) are also repaired by staff during winter months. Organized sports: A number of private sports organizations utilize Iowa City’s 45 competitive-use fields for practice, games, soccer camps and tournaments:  Iowa City Kickers Soccer  Iowa City Girls Softball  Iowa City Boys Baseball  Iowa City Babe Ruth Baseball - 151 -  City High Baseball  Iowa Premiere Soccer League, including the Iowa City Alliance Soccer Club  USSSA Baseball traveling squads Parks staff provide support for these groups through field maintenance (including three practice fields); eleven lighting systems and over 60,000 linear feet of irrigation systems. Support for City High Baseball at the Mercer Park facility is provided through a 28E agreement with the Iowa City Community School District. There were 4,130 games and practices for the Iowa City sports affiliates in 2011. Other facilities: There are a number of unique facilities within Iowa City’s parks which require special maintenance and/or management service arrangements. These include:  Riverside Festival stage  City Park’s winter ice-skating area  Terrell Mill skateboard park  Wetherby Park splash pad  Thornberry and Rita’s Ranch Off Leash Dog Parks  Iowa City disk golf course  City Park carnival rides  Numerous volleyball, horseshoe and bocce ball courts The five children’s carnival rides located at City Park must be inspected and serviced daily during months of operation. This includes a miniature train track and antique carousel. Other activities: The Parks Division also assists with other Parks and Recreation programs, as needed. Staff prepare community gardens prior to planting season and clear them after harvest season. Services are also provided in support of the Benton Hill Neighborhood Association’s garden space. Parks staff assists the Recreation division with Farmers Market, demonstration gardens, T-ball and kiddie soccer; and the Forestry division with storm debris clean-up and difficult tree removals. Revenue: While the majority of the Parks Division’s funding is supported by tax revenues, the Division receives significant revenue from facility rentals and program participation fees. - 152 - - 153 - DEPARTMENT: PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION: RECREATION DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES General Recreation Activities OPEN GYM AND GAME ROOM PLAY includes basketball, volleyball, table tennis, billiards, foosball, and table games. In addition to scheduled programs, day-to-day open public use is available in the weight room and exercise room. FARMERS’ MARKET makes homegrown fruits, vegetables, homemade baked goods, foodstuffs, handcrafts, and flowers available. The market season is May through October and is held on Wednesday evenings and Saturday mornings. MARKET MUSIC features performances by local musicians on Wednesdays, June through August, in Chauncey Swan Park before and during the Farmers’ Market. RECREATION CENTERS: The Iowa City Recreation Division provides recreational facilities for everyone. The Robert A. Lee Community Recreation Center houses a variety of activity spaces including: A gymnasium, weight room, pool, game room, racquetball courts, craft room, social hall, photo darkroom, and potter’s studio. A kitchen and meeting rooms are also available for public use. The Scanlon Gymnasium addition at the Mercer Park Aquatic Center provides gymnasiums, a game room, and multipurpose rooms. GRANT WOOD GYM is located at Grant Wood elementary school Social & Cultural Activities CULTURAL/SOCIAL PROGRAMS are provided year-round for all ages. Most art programs are offered in 4, 5, 8, and 10 week sessions and are available 48 weeks of the year. The Division sponsors a children’s theatre in cooperation with the Young Footliters and the Iowa City Community Theatre. A potter’s studio, darkroom, watercolor studio, painting facilities, print shop, and craft room are available year-round. - 154 - SPECIAL EVENTS, WORKSHOPS, AND CLINICS include coach’s training, trips, teen dances, artist residencies, music performances, holiday events, and no- school day activities. SUMMER CAMP offers eight weeks of swimming, crafts, roller skating, field trips, sports, and elective camps. This indoor/outdoor camp consists of eight one- week sessions for children completing grades K-6. PLAYGROUNDS provide supervised activities in several Iowa City park sites. Sports, games, crafts, and special events are included. This eight-week summer program is designed for children completing grades K-6. Aquatics AQUATICS PROGRAM offers a variety of levels in swimming instruction. Along with lessons, the Robert A. Lee Community Recreation Center pool is available at various hours for public swimming, lap swim, and specialty classes. The Mercer Park Aquatic Center, completed in 1988, is indoors and offers a variety of programs as well. The division maintains one outdoor pool at City Park for summer classes and open swim. CITY PARK POOL is located outdoors on Park Road in Upper City Park on the northwest side of Iowa City. This is a T-shaped pool featuring a super shallow area on both sides of the ‘T,’ a 50-meter and 25-yard lap swim area, and two (2) one-meter and two (2) three-meter diving boards. The pool depth ranges from 1 to 14 feet. The facility also features a small wading pool for use by young children being directly supervised by a responsible adult (16 years or older). The City Park Pool is open from Memorial Day to Labor Day. MERCER AQUATIC CENTER is divided into three separate sections. The deep section is on the east end of the pool. This section is 25 yards long; depth ranges from 4'6" to 12' and contains two (2) one-meter diving boards. The middle section is 25 yards long; depth ranges from 4'2" to 4'6". The shallow section is on the west end of the pool. It is approximately 2'6" to 4'. There is an outside wading pool area which requires children to have adult supervision. The Mercer Park Aquatic Center is equipped with a 12 person spa. Use of the spa is restricted to adults (16 years or older) and children who are directly supervised by a responsible adult (someone 16 years or older). Those with heart conditions, high blood pressure, pregnant women, young children, and others with health concerns should consult a physician before using the spa. To insure proper function of the spa, the pool manager reserves the right to restrict use by - 155 - children (15 years and younger) during times of peak use. The spa is not open for use during times reserved for swimming lessons. ROBERT A. LEE POOL is located at 220 S. Gilbert St. in downtown Iowa City. This is an L-shaped pool featuring a 25-yard main body, with the water ranging from 3 to 5 feet in this area. The bottom of the ‘L’ is a 10 -foot deep diving well which does not have a diving board. There is a wading pool area which requires children to have adult supervision. This pool is in operation on a year-round basis. Special Populations Involvement (SPI) THE SPECIAL POPULATIONS INVOLVEMENT (S.P.I.) PROGRAMS provide year-round recreation for persons with special needs of all ages and ability levels. A principal goal for the programs is to enhance independent leisure skills and lifestyles of persons with various disabilities. S.P.I. programs promote skill development and offer educational activities, while maintaining the recreational values. The S.P.I. programs are offered year-round through five- and ten-week programming sessions. Each session includes programs and activities in the following recreation areas: sports and fitness, arts, music and movement, independent living skills, special events, clubs, and social activities. The S.P.I. program offers year-round Special Olympics sports training and competition. Adult Sports ADULT SPORTS PROGRAMS include men’s, women’s and co-recreational basketball, volleyball, and softball leagues. Over 100 teams participate in our summer softball leagues and 40 in the fall league. Up to 100 teams are involved in volleyball and 50 teams in basketball. Competitive and recreational fall, winter, and spring leagues are established to meet participants’ interests. AEROBICS, FITNESS, AND WELLNESS CLASSES run year-round. Classes are established for those persons just beginning to those individuals who are advanced. Both low-impact and high-intensity aerobics are offered. Step aerobics, aquacise, and exercise classes are popular. Youth Sports YOUTH SPORTS AND WELLNESS PROGRAMS offered by the Iowa City Recreation Division are diverse and well-attended by community residents. Year-round programs are established for all ages. Youth sports include flag football, basketball, volleyball, softball, baseball, tennis, and a variety of special events such as the Hershey Track and Field Meet. The youth sports programs - 156 - follow a basic philosophy that the child and learning come first and competition second. Programs are designed to allow for instruction, full-participation, and fun. The Recreation Division also works cooperatively with local sports associations to provide program opportunities. TENNIS LESSONS for youth run approximately eight weeks in the summer (two four-week sessions) at both City Park and Mercer Park. In addition to our regular tennis program, the Iowa City Recreation Division works closely with the United States Tennis Association (USTA) to provide classes, tournaments, and special events. GYMNASTICS INSTRUCTION is offered year-round. Parent Tot Tumbling (2-3 year olds) and Tiny Tumblers (3-5 year olds) meet twice weekly during the school year. Saturday classes (2-8 year olds) are offered for five-week sessions, meeting one time per week throughout the year. TEEN PROGRAMING provides various after-school activities and special events for teens to participate in. The Scanlon Gymnasium’s main focus is to provide a safe environment for teens Revenue: The Recreation Division receives significant funding from program participation fees, agreements with other local jurisdictions, and facility rentals. The Recreation Division’s goal is for all non-property tax revenue sources to fund 50% of program costs. The formula for calculating this cost-recovery ratio uses all non-property tax revenue including the hotel/motel tax as a percentage of costs excluding capital outlay and transfers out. - 157 - The following charts display all revenues and expenditures and do not reflect the cost-recovery percentage formula described above. - 158 - - 159 - DEPARTMENT: PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION: FORESTRY DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Forestry staff provide arboricultural services for the trees located in the city right-of-way, city parks, open space, and other public property as needed. Forestry staff respond to and resolve service requests regarding hazardous trees, low limbs, and diseased trees. Forestry staff continually perform routine street tree pruning throughout the city. Forestry staff respond to after-hours storm damage of public and private trees when they impact a public facility or service. Forestry staff issue and inspect contracts for tree and stump removal and tree planting. Forestry staff regularly advise Engineering and Housing Inspection Services staff regarding tree protection during construction and/or demolition projects, species selection for building permits, zoning requests, and hazardous tree assessment on private property. Forestry staff plant trees on the right-of-way, in city parks, and as part of the memorial tree program; and maintain a city nursery of difficult-to-find trees for right-of-way and park plantings. Forestry staffinspect and advise citizens regarding species selection and location for right-of-way planting permits. The division also advises other City departments with general landscape and tree care guidelines. In addition to the Forestry staff’s winter pruning responsibilities, they assist Parks staff by clearing snow and ice from sidewalks and trails along designated snow routes, and they participate in weekend call-in for snow and ice removal. Forestry staff will complete or provide action on all service requests within 30 days of receipt of the request. The division will plant a minimum of 125 trees per year, and will prune 1800 per year. Hazardous tree or limb requests will be considered to pose an imminent threat and will be inspected within 72 hours of receipt of the request, and will be prioritized according to the degree of threat. Staff is also responsible for keeping streets open for emergency vehicles and emergency work (caused by wind, ice, etc.). - 160 - - 161 - DEPARTMENT: PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION: CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT (CBD) DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Central Business District (CBD) staff provide for grounds maintenance in the City Plaza (pedestrian mall) and adjacent areas, including City Hall and Chauncey Swan Park. This includes, but is not limited to the following responsibilities:  Ground litter and leaf removal in the City Plaza on a daily basis throughout the year, and twice per week in outer areas for the spring, summer, and fall seasons  Design, installation and maintenance of planting beds with annuals and perennials in the aforementioned areas and various city parks  Assist organizations and persons in preparations for special events held in the City Plaza  Snow and ice removal of natural accumulations in the City Plaza, including clearing sidewalk areas, the fire lane and a minimum of two crosswalks per half block.  Snow and ice removal to various City-owned park areas, bridges, and right-of-ways on assigned routes, as needed.  Maintenance of site furnishings: play equipment and surfaces, trash receptacles, bicycle racks, benches, kiosks, posting pillars, drinking fountains, trellises, the Weather Dance Fountain, recycling units and tree grates.  Staff also monitors contracts and vendors as needed to ensure quality and efficient services. - 162 - - 163 - DEPARTMENT: PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION: OAKLAND CEMETERY DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Continued assistance with family members/funeral homes regarding funeral arrangements; determine right of interment, interment placement, lot sales/repurchases; complete billing and maintain records.  Assist the general public/funeral homes/monument dealers with genealogy requests, lot locations and explanation, enforcement of cemetery rules and regulations.  Maintain all cemetery grounds, buildings, equipment, and snow route.  Oakland Cemetery occupies 40+ acres adjacent to the western edge of Hickory Hill Park. There have been an estimated 18,000 interments in the cemetery to date.  Recent expansion: 64 niche infant columbarium.  Future expansion: mausoleum, columbarium addition, purchase surrounding property and/or expand to the east. - 164 - - 165 - DEPARTMENT: PARKS & RECREATION DIVISION: GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Government Buildings staff provide routine custodial services and other periodic maintenance projects for City Hall, utilizing a combination of in-house and contracted services. Staff provide daily cleaning and maintenance for this 64,445 sq. ft. building, including Police and Fire facilities which are in operation 24/7. HVAC zones are also maintained daily for optimal energy efficiency, productivity, and comfort. - 166 - - 167 - DEPART S L P The Se educatio Educatio producti Social Classes for part commun fundrais Services Nurses A into The TMENT / D Senior Cen Location: Phone: enior Cente on, social onal classe on, music, engagemen , which are ticipants to nity activiti ing activitie s, Voluntee Association e Center. In DIVISION: ter Coordi DES er’s progra engagem es cover e and art edu nt among e often ope o interact w es to teac es. The A er Lawyers n, and Seni n addition, nator: SCRIPTIO am compo ment, phys everything ucation. participan en to non-m with each ch, share AARP Tax s, Senior H ior Nutrition The Cente SEN ON OF AC nents prov sical activ from litera nts and w members o other. V information Aide Prog Health Insu n Program a r’s role in t NIOR CENT L 2 ( CTIVITIES vide a va vity, and ature and within the or intergene Volunteer g n about T gram, Unive rance Info all ensure t the Respec TER Linda Kopp 28 S. Linn S 319) 356-5 S riety of op community fitness cla community erational, in groups are The Center ersity of Io rmation Pr that the com cting Your W ing St. 5220 pportunities y involvem asses to v y is promo ncorporate e involved r, and con owa Couns rogram, Vis mmunity co Wishes initi s for ment. video oted. time with nduct eling siting omes ative - 168 - will bring people of all ages into The Center for consultation with trained senior volunteers on the preparation and distribution of advanced care directives. Another community outreach service offered by The Center involves performances in venues throughout the county by the New Horizons Band and ensemble groups, New Horizons Orchestra, Voices of Experience, Senior Standing Room Only Theatre Group, Senior Center Dance Team, and Reading Aloud Poetry Group. These performances benefit both the performers and the audience. Performers are able to share their talents with the community and maintain or expand mental fitness and social connections. Viewers can enjoy entertainment in an environment that promotes social interaction. Working as teachers, leaders, project directors, building supervisors, or special project volunteers, Center volunteers play a critical role in the successful operation of The Center. Staff members routinely recognize the significant and meaningful contributions made by volunteers. Notably, this type of volunteering can bring a sense of purpose or meaningfulness to a person’s life. Establishing social connections, keeping active physically and mentally, and maintaining contact with the community are cornerstones of optimal aging, and they are what we do best at The Center. MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The mission of the Senior Center is to promote optimal aging among older adults by offering programs and services that promote wellness, social interaction, community engagement, and intellectual growth. The Center serves the public through intergenerational programming and community outreach. The Senior Center’s goals further the City’s strategic plan goals of Coordinated Communication and Customer Service Orientation and Planning and Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas. OBJECTIVES 1. Provide a wide variety of classes and educational opportunities. 2. Increase the amount and quality of social engagement for members and non- members. 3. Provide access to resources that increase participants’ physical activity. 4. Increase community involvement. 5. Improve the stability and diversity of Center funding. - 169 - PERFORMANCE MEASURES* 2007 2008 2009 2010 Total Members (Objectives #1-3) 1003 1071 1217 1287 Senior Center Visits (Objectives #1-3) 56,189 73,431 92,324 93,419 Volunteers (Objective #4) 445 453 498 500 Rental Income (Objective #5) $371 $1,084 $1,511 $2,151 Contributions and Donations (Objective #5) $93,525 $27,720 $48,394 $20,499 County Revenue (Objective #5) $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 * A full performance measure report is available in Appendix A of this document. Revenue: The Center is primarily funded through property tax revenues. In FY 2012, General Levy comprised over seventy-seven percent (77%) of the Center’s revenues. Johnson County also provides funding to The Center. This is in support of those patrons who live outside of Iowa City’s corporate limits. From The Center’s inception in 1981, until 2003, the City and the County maintained a 28E agreement that split operational costs 80% to 20%, respectively. County funding peaked at $141,410 in FY 2002. In 2003, the County withdrew from this agreement and decreased funding to $75,000 annually in FY2004. In FY 2012, the City was asked to submit an Economic Development/Quality of Life Block Grant application to Johnson County in order to receive funding. For FY 2012 and FY 2013, this grant has been $70,000 annually, or approximately eight percent (8%) of the Center’s funding. Nineteen percent (19%) of the Center’s members are county residents not living in Iowa City. For this reason, The Center’s membership and program participation was reviewed during preparation of the FY 2013 adopted budget, County grant revenue was estimated at approximately $166,000 (19% of the Center’s operating budget), based on this review. Subsequent to budget adoption, the Johnson County Board of Supervisors approved FY 2013 funding of $70,000 on April 26, 2012. - 170 - In order amende for mem an addit The foll changes *R to compen ed on July 1 mberships a tional $23,2 lowing cha s noted abo Reflects $7 nsate for the 1, 2012 to r nd parking 288 during F arts display ove in the C 70,000 actu e difference reflect great passes. T FY 2013. y the Cen Center’s FY al Johnson e in County ter property The new fee ter’s majo 2013 budg County fun y revenue, t y tax suppo e structures r revenue geted reven nding and n the FY 2013 ort and a ne s are expec sources a nues. new fee stru 3 budget w ew fee struc cted to gene and reflect uctures. will be cture erate t the - 171 - Senior Center Operations Senior Center Coordinator Operations Assistant SPECIALISTS 1 Program Specialist 1 Volunteer Specialist SENIOR CENTER 1 M.W. III – Senior Center 1 M.W. I – Senior Center Receptionist (.50) - 172 - - 173 - - 174 - GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES COMMUNITY & ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Planning & Community Dev. Admin. Urban Planning & Historic Preservation Neighborhood Services Public Art Community Development – Non Grant Human Services Economic Development F Y 2 0 1 3 Artist rendering of development in the Riverfront Crossings District on Gilbert St., south of Burlington St. Planning and Community Development Director: Jeff Davidson Economic Development Coordinator: Wendy Ford Community Development Coordinator: Stephen Long Urban Planning, Senior Planner: Bob Miklo MPOJC Executive Director: John Yapp Neighborhood Services, Planner: Marcia Bollinger Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5230 MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS It is the mission of the Department of Planning and Community Development to facilitate the successful growth of the community. The goals of the Department of Planning and Community Development further the City’s strategic plan goals of Economic and Community Development, Planning and Development of the Downtown and Near Downtown Areas, and Neighborhood Stabilization. PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 175 - DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Coordinate all land use planning functions consistent with the goals of the adopted Comprehensive Plan.  Promote economic development activities which grow the property tax base and create jobs.  Facilitate communication and cooperation between the City and the neighborhood associations.  Fulfill all requirements of federal grant programs.  Fulfill all requirements of the federal 3-C transportation planning process and the federally-mandated MPO process.  Promote neighborhood stabilization.  Data collection and analysis to support land use planning, economic development, grant applications and administration, and other department functions. Staffing changes: During FY 2012, staff time in the Planning and Community Development Department was reassigned, due to reductions in Housing and Urban Development programming and an increased focus on Economic Development. This affected MPO of Johnson County, CDBG, and HOME programming. The changes resulted in a net reduction of 2.0 FTE positions. - 176 - Urban Planning (Historic Preservation) Planning & Community Development Neighborhood Services (Public Art) Community Development Economic Development *Special Revenue Funds Administrative Secretary PCD Clerk Engineering Technician Administration PCD Director Human Services* CDBG* HOME* Flood Recovery & Mitigation Grants General Rehabilitation & Improvement Program (GRIP*) UniverCity* MPOJC* MPOJC - 177 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: ADMINISTRATION MISSION STATEMENT Professional oversight of four PCD divisions and the MPO. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Obtain adequate resources for the operation of the department.  Perform clerical and administrative tasks.  Liaison between the Department, the City Manager’s Office, and the City Council.  Coordinate the PCD/MPOJC Management Team.  Implementation of elements of the City Council Strategic Plan.  Administer unique capital, research, and/or policy-oriented projects as directed by the City Council. - 178 - - 179 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: URBAN PLANNING & HISTORIC PRESERVATION MISSION STATEMENT To promote sustainable growth and development within the city by establishing comprehensive plans and associated policies and regulations that ensure that the best qualities of the city’s residential, commercial, and employment areas are preserved and supported while promoting new development opportunities that will create long term value for the community. The division fulfills state statutory requirements pertaining to zoning, development, and historic preservation. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Urban Planning coordinates preparation of the Comprehensive Plan; including district plans that focus on development, redevelopment, preservation and conservation issues within the city’s ten neighborhood districts. Drafting of these plans includes extensive citizen participation through public planning workshops, surveys and interviews with property owners, developers, realtors, environmental organizations and neighborhood groups. The division also provides staffing for the following boards and commissions, which are associated with developmental regulations and zoning:  The Planning and Zoning Commission is charged with drafting and implementation of the zoning code and subdivision regulations in accordance with the Comprehensive Plan. Commission members review annexations and requests for rezoning and subdivision; making a final recommendation to City Council.  The Board of Adjustment reviews requests for special exceptions, variances and other appeals pertaining to the zoning code.  The Historic Preservation Commission conducts studies and implements regulations designed to promote the preservation of historic landmarks and districts. Urban Planning staff research these topics, provide planning services and make recommendations to these boards and commissions. Staff prepare the meeting agendas and minutes. Staff also administers the design review process for infill apartment buildings and urban renewal projects. - 180 - - 181 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: NEIGHBORHOOD SERVICES MISSION STATEMENT Provide a conduit between all City departments and the network of neighborhood associations within Iowa City, and facilitate the distribution of funds made available by the City Council for small-scale neighborhood improvements. DESCRIPTION OF SERVICES Neighborhood Services supports and encourages citizens to help shape the future of their neighborhood. By assisting in the establishment of neighborhood associations, and coordinating with 33 neighborhood associations, this division seeks to encourage action by providing ideas and resources that help associations address their needs and interests within the goals of the larger community. The City Council has made funds available to neighborhood associations through the PIN (Program for Improving Neighborhoods) grant program, with $15,000 available, annually. Administration of this program involves making applications available to the neighborhoods, clarifying the administrative rules, assisting with project development, review by the Neighborhood Council, preparation of a recommendation to the City Council, formal approval by the City Council, execution of contract documents, and implementation of projects. - 182 - - 183 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: PUBLIC ART MISSION STATEMENT Develop and maintain the City’s inventory of public art, and encourage privately- owned art in public spaces. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Public Art program was established by City Council in 1997 and initiated by the Arts/Business Partnership of the Iowa City Area Chamber of Commerce. An advisory committee is charged with commissioning, procurement, maintenance, and decommissioning of public art. It maintains a relationship with the City of Literature and the literary arts. Although originally involved in the funding and commissioning of public art, budget realities have resulted in a culture of facilitating no-cost and low-cost public art opportunities. Examples of Public Art Program-facilitated installations include Herky on Parade (2004), Bookmarks (2011), and numerous art pieces throughout downtown Iowa City and within Iowa City parks. - 184 - - 185 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT MISSION STATEMENT Augment federal funding of community development and economic development activities. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Community Development staff are committed to providing Iowa City residents with access to safe and affordable housing, jobs and services. This is accomplished by coordinating efforts with local agencies, non profit organizations and other community partners, and by administering and coordinating activities relating to city, state, and federal housing and community development programs. Economic development activities include:  Neighborhood redevelopment  Entrepreneurial development  Working with financial institutions The Housing Rehabilitation program works to help residents maintain and update their homes by providing financial assistance to income eligible homeowners. The availability of affordable, low or no-interest loans provides lower income homeowners the opportunity to make repairs on their homes and ultimately helps to maintain Iowa City's housing stock. Funding is available through the federally- funded Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME Investment Partnership programs, and through the General Rehabilitation and Improvement Program (GRIP), which is funded by general obligation bonds. - 186 - - 187 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: HUMAN SERVICES – GENERAL FUND MISSION STATEMENT Coordinate with United Way of Johnson County and the Housing and Community Development Commission in providing funds for human service agencies. OBJECTIVES This cost center is new with the FY2013 budget proposal and assumes some of the duties previously provided by the MPO of Johnson County’s Human Services Division. The City Council makes annual allocations to the area’s human service agencies as part of the budget process. This is reflected in the following schedule. These monies were accounted for in the General Fund’s Non- Operational Administration account in prior years. Staff support will provide for the following:  Examine needs of community  Determine funding priorities  Allocate funds  Implement performance measures - 188 - Actual FY2010 Actual FY2011 Budget FY2012 Request FY2013 Recommended FY2013 Human Service Agencies: 4 C's -$ -$ 2,000$ 2,000$ 2,000$ Arc of SEI - - 2,000 N/A Big Brothers/Big Sisters 35,000 32,000 32,000 35,000 32,000 Compeer - 5,000 5,000 10,000 5,000 14,000 14,000 14,000 N/A Crisis Center 36,500 46,557 40,000 42,000 40,000 Domestic Violence Program 52,000 48,344 52,000 55,000 50,000 Elder Services Agency 54,055 54,000 54,000 55,620 52,000 Four Oaks - - 1,000 1,000 1,000 Free Lunch Program - - 2,000 2,000 2,000 Free Medical Clinic 7,263 13,330 7,500 8,000 7,500 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 8,000 ICARE - Iowa Center for Aids Resource/MECCA 8,950 8,950 8,950 20,000 18,950 Jo Co Office of the American Red Cross 6,000 6,000 6,000 N/A Mayor's Youth Employment Program 14,000 11,965 10,000 N/A Neighborhood Centers 55,000 54,896 60,000 63,000 60,000 Pathways Adult Daycare 5,000 4,879 Rape Victim Advocacy 12,000 12,000 12,000 14,000 12,000 Shelter House 35,500 40,112 36,500 40,000 36,500 United Action for Youth (UAY)60,000 58,940 60,000 65,000 60,000 398,268$ 414,094$ 412,950$ 425,620$ 391,829$ Contingency Funding:10,000 24,128 7,197 408,268$ 438,222$ 420,147$ 391,829$ (115,000) (120,000) (115,000) (91,000) (28,044) (26,656) (28,044) (26,656) 265,224$ 285,794$ 277,103$ 274,173$ REQUESTS FOR AID TO AGENCIES General Fund Aid to Human Services Agencies: Housing Trust Fund of Iowa City Consortium for Youth Employment Water, Sewer and Stormwater Utility Billing Abatements Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Less direct funding from: Grand Total: Aid to Human Services Agencies Subtotal: Human Services Agencies Aid to Human Service Agencies is recommended at $391,829 in FY2013; with $274,173 budgeted from General Fund, $91,000 from Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), and $26,656 from Water, Sewer and Stormwater utility billing abatements. Aid to Agency funding, previously budgeted within Non -Operational Administration, is budgeted within the Human Services Division, effective for FY2013. - 189 - - 190 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT MISSION STATEMENT Facilitate growing the community, increasing the property tax base, and creating jobs. Serve as a resource for businesses operating in or considering operating in Iowa City. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Economic Development Division researches, compiles and analyzes demographic and economic data in order to recommend, implement, and advocate policies and programs designed to further the economic development of Iowa City. Staff members work closely with the Chamber of Commerce, Iowa City Area Development Group (ICAD), University of Iowa, and others in promoting the City as a viable business location. They assist developers and prospective companies with commercial and industrial development projects. Staff advises the City Council, boards and commissions regarding economic development projects and proposals. Staff also prepare grant applications and monitor award agreements when applicable. - 191 - The following chart summarizes past and future funding commitments for community and economic development. These monies are budgeted to come from the General Fund: Actual FY2011 Budget FY2012 Proposed FY2013 Projected FY2014 Projected FY2015 $ 36,276 $ 150,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 $ 50,000 $ 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 186,382$ 186,382$ 186,382$ 186,382$ 186,382$ 100,000$ 100,000$ 100,000$ 100,000$ 100,000$ $ - $ - 30,000 25,000 20,000 3,622$ 196,378$ -$ 100,000$ -$ 426,279$ 732,760$ 466,382$ 461,382$ 456,382$ Iowa City / Coralville Convention & Visitors Bureau:2 Englert Theatre:1 (Three-year commitment through FY2012) Total Community & Economic Development Assistance: Iowa City Area Development Group, Inc.: Other Economic Development Assistance: City of Literature:1 Downtown Co-Work Space: Riverside Theatre:3 Community & Economic Development Assistance 1 The three-year commitment through FY2015 is recommended for extension by the EconomicDevelopment Committee through FY2015. 2 Twenty-five percent (25%) of Hotel Motel Tax revenue is dedicated by Council resolution to provide funding to the Iowa City / Coralville Convention & Visitors Bureau (ICCVB). This activity was previously budgeted in General Fund Non-Operational Admin and moved to the Economic Development cost center with the FY2013 budget proposal. 3 Three -year commitment recommended by the Economic Development Committee through FY2015. - 192 - - 193 - - 194 - GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES GENERAL GOVERNMENT City Council City Manager City Clerk Human Resources City Attorney Human Rights Non-Operational Administration Community Event Funding Finance Department Tort Liability Insurance F Y 2 0 1 3 DEPARTMENT / DIVISION: CITY COUNCIL Mayor: Matt Hayek (At-Large) Mayor Pro Tem: Susan Mims (At-Large) Connie Champion (District B) Terry Dickens (At-Large) Rick Dobyns (District A) Michelle Payne (At-Large) Jim Throgmorton (District C) Office: 410 E. Washington St. Email: council@iowa-city.org All correspondence addressed to the entire City Council becomes a permanent public record and is archived on the City website. MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Iowa City City Council is to serve faithfully the residents and businesses of Iowa City and develop the City’s overall quality of life. The Council does this by setting policy for the City and direction for Iowa City’s City Manager and its Boards and Commission. With input from citizens, City staff, and Department Heads, the City Council developed and adopted the City’s strategic plan. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The City Council provides policy direction for the City of Iowa City. The Council conducts public meetings, passes resolutions and ordinances, conducts legislative oversight for the residents and businesses in Iowa City, and overseas all Boards and Commissions. The City Council is composed of seven (7) council members on staggered terms. Councilmembers represent the community at- large and three districts. The Mayor of Iowa City is elected internally by the Council and maintains office for one year. - 195 - - 196 - DEPARTMENT / DIVISION: CITY MANAGER City Manager: Tom Markus Assistant to the City Manager: Geoff Fruin Administrative Assistant to the City Manager: Adam Bentley Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5010 MISSION STATEMENT The City Manager strives to ensure City services are provided in an efficient, responsible manner. Through effectively managing the City’s operating departments, the City Manager seeks to implement policy that is consistent with the preferences of Iowa City’s citizens, as reflected in the direction provided by the City Council. Further, the City Manager provides Council with information needed to make informed policy decisions. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The City Manager is the chief administrative officer for the City and is appointed by the City Council, managing the City’s day-to-day operations under broad policy direction from Council. The City Manager supervises the activities of all City departments and advises the City Council on matters relating to planning, development, and municipal operations. The City Manager implements policy decisions of the City Council and enforces City ordinances through the management of the City’s operating departments and the administration of the City’s personnel system. The City Manager also oversees administration of City contracts, execution of public improvements, as well as construction, improvement, and maintenance of all City facilities. The City Manager prepare s a proposed annual budget and submits it to the City Council for consideration and - 197 - final approval consistent with State law, along with presenting policy and program recommendations to the City Council. In FY12, the City engaged in a lobbying contract with the Des Moines-based law firm Davis Brown. This contract and the lobbyists’ activities are overseen by the City Manager’s Office. Staffing changes: In FY 2012, the Assistant City Manager position was reclassified as the Assistant to the City Manager following the retirement of the City’s longtime Assistant City Manager. Effective in FY 2013, three City staff members will be reassigned to the City Manager’s Office as part of the City’s new Public Information Office. - 198 - - 199 - DEPARTMENT / DIVISION: CITY CLERK City Clerk: Marian Karr Deputy City Clerk: Julie Voparil Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5043 MISSION STATEMENT The City Clerk is the official recordkeeping office of the City, performing recordkeeping duties as prescribed by State Law, the City Charter, and the Municipal Code. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The City Clerk is appointed by the City Council, reports directly to the Council and attends all City Council meetings. The City Clerk is charged with custody of deeds, contracts, and abstracts. The Clerk's office is responsible for the keeping of all ordinances, resolutions, minutes, and the City Code. The office publishes public notices, ordinances, and minutes as required by law. The City Clerk's office assists both staff and the general public in researching information. Taxi company licenses and driver authorization, dancing permits, outdoor service areas, cigarette licenses, beer/liquor licenses, and cemetery deeds are issued from the Clerk's office. City subdivision files, project files, the Domestic Partnership Registry, and an index of Council proceedings are also maintained in the office. The Clerk's office also provides staff support for the Police Citizens Review Board (PCRB) and the Youth Advisory Commission. The Police Citizens Review Board, based on a citizen initiative, was established in 1997. The board reviews police policies, procedures, and practices and may recommend modifications to them. The PCRB also reviews reports prepared after investigation of complaints about alleged police misconduct and then issues its own written report. The Board is also required to - 200 - maintain a central registry of complaints and holds at least one community forum each year for the purpose of hearing citizens’ views on the policies, practices and procedures of the Iowa City Police Department. The Youth Advisory Commission promotes understanding and awareness of Iowa City among Iowa City youth; allows a select group of youth to help make decisions concerning them and their peers; enables youth members to utilize and expand on their leadership abilities to serve as a mechanism for communication between youth and adults in Iowa City; and creates a bridge whereon youth and adults can develop partnerships. The Iowa City Youth Advisory Commission empowers, engages, and fosters youth participation in its local community; and more specifically provides a “sounding board” for youth issues affecting the Iowa City community youth. - 201 - - 202 - DEPARTMENT: CITY MANAGER DIVISION: HUMAN RESOURCES Human Resources Administrator: Karen Jennings Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5020 MISSION STATEMENT To provide quality, comprehensive Human Resources services to the City of Iowa City and its employees with integrity, responsiveness, and sensitivity to the employees of the City and other customer, consistent with appropriate best practices and legal requirements. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES To provide quality, comprehensive Human Resources services to the City of Iowa City and its employees in the areas of:  Employee and labor relations for approximately 1,000 City employees, both permanent and temporary  Collective bargaining and contract administration for three collective bargaining agreements: AFSCME, Police, and Fire unions  Civil Service compliance per Chapter 400 of the Code of Iowa  Comprehensive benefits administration for approximately 640 permanent employees  Internal and external recruitment for permanent and temporary positions in compliance with Chapter 400 of the Iowa Code, collective bargaining agreements, and Personnel Policies  Personnel policy development and administration  Administration of applicable state and federal employment laws - 203 - - 204 - DEPARTMENT / DIVISION: CITY ATTORNEY City Attorney: Eleanor Dilkes First Assistant Attorney: Sarah Holecek Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5030 MISSION STATEMENT The City Attorney’s Office represents the City in court litigation and provides legal advice, opinions, and services to City staff, boards, and commissions. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The City Attorney is appointed by the City Council and works at the direction of the City Council. The City Attorney supervises the City Attorney's Office, including four Assistant City Attorneys. In addition, the City Attorney acts as Chief Legal Counsel to the City Council, City Manager, the various City departments and staff, and most City commissions, committees and boards. The City Attorney also reviews and approves proposed City ordinances, resolutions, contracts, and other legal documents; oversees property acquisition needed for public improvements; prepares legal opinions for Council and City staff; and represents the City in litigation in which the City is involved, including violations of City ordinances. - 205 - - 206 - DEPARTMENT: CITY MANAGER DIVISION: HUMAN RIGHTS Human Rights Coordinator: Stefanie Bowers Human Rights Investigator: Kristin Watson Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5022 MISSION STATEMENT The staff of the Human Rights Commission strives to ensure equal opportunity in education, employment, credit, housing, and public accommodation with efficiency and competency. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Human Rights Coordinator enforces the local antidiscrimination laws, receives, evaluates, investigates and makes recommendations on complaints of unlawful discrimination. Conducts training, prepares specialized materials including correspondence, brochures, and advertisements. Receives daily inquiries, makes public presentations, plans programs for both cable and the community, provides specialized reports to state agencies and serves as secretary and liaison to the Human Rights Commission. Other responsibilities include but are not limited to assisting the City in its compliance with local, state, and federal civil rights laws and reviewing contract compliance with the Equal Opportunity Program. The Human Rights Division receives, processes, and investigates complaints of unlawful discrimination. Responds to requests and concerns, provides assistance to the public, makes referrals to appropriate agencies as needed, and participates in training regarding civil rights and discrimination issues. The mission of the Human Rights Commission is to foster inclusiveness in the community by disseminating information to educate the public on illegal discrimination and civil rights. - 207 - The Commission has the authority to make recommendations to the City Council for such further policy or legislation concerning discrimination as the Commission may deem necessary and desirable. In addition, the Commission organizes and plans programs of community need or concern by itself or in cooperation with other agencies both public and private whose purposes are not inconsistent with the Human Rights Ordinance. Staffing changes: In FY 2012, an unfilled, .50 FTE Human Rights Investigator position was eliminated. This is consistent with the City’s practice of staff reductions occurring primarily through attrition. - 208 - - 209 - Finance Director: Kevin O’Malley Controller: Robin Marshall ITS Coordinator: Gary Cohn Revenue and Risk Manager: Melissa Miller Purchasing Agent: Mary Niichel-Hegwood Office Location: 410 E. Washington St. Phone: (319) 356-5050 MISSION STATEMENT It is the mission of the Finance Department to provide quality services to the residents and to safeguard City assets. The role of the Finance Department is to support the operating departments in achieving their program objectives utilizing effective and efficient financial planning, reporting, and central support systems. The goals of the Finance Department further the City’s strategic plan goals of: A Strong and Sustainable Financial Foundation and Economic and Community Development. OPERATING DIVISIONS The Finance Department encompasses the following operating divisions and accounts:  Finance Administration  Accounting  Document Services  Central Services / Purchasing  Information Technology Services  Revenue  Risk Management Staffing changes: This budget contains staff reorganization that affects the Finance Department. Effective in FY 2013, the four-person Document Services Division will be eliminated, with two staff members from Document Services and a third from Information Technology Services joining the City Manager’s Office as part of the new Public Information Office. This reorganization will be completed at the start of the fiscal year, July 1, 2013. The reorganization entails a net loss of two staff positions organization-wide. FINANCE DEPARTMENT SUMMARY - 210 - Finance Administration Information Technology Services (ITS) Internal Service/ Special Revenue Funds General Fund Accounts Risk Management Central Services Health Insurance Dental Insurance Accounting Document Services Purchasing Revenue Non-Operational Administration Debt Service - 211 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: ADMINISTRATION MISSION STATEMENT Finance Administration provides direction and administrative support to departmental operating divisions. It supervises the preparation and dissemination of financial data for use by City Council and staff in making managerial decisions and coordinates the annual budget process. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Monitor financial trends and provide analysis of budget to actual data and three- year financial projections  Monitor and provide oversight of long and short-term investment portfolio  Monitor cash flows and reserves  Maintain overall financial health and preserve the City’s Aaa bond rating  Oversee preparation of general liability, fire & casualty and workers compensation insurance specifications  Coordinate annual health and dental insurance renewals  FEMA claim administration and recovery  Preparation of the annual budget, three-year financial plan and five-year capital improvements program (CIP) and subsequent amendments thereof - 212 - - 213 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: NON-OPERATIONAL ADMINISTRATION The Non-Operational Administration cost center facilities financial transactions which are non-operational in nature. Employee Benefits Levy: State code requires that a separate fund be established to account for revenue from the Employee Benefits Levy. Monies are then transferred into Non-Op Admin to cover General Fund’s share of Employee Benefit costs levied. Local Option Sales Tax: A one percent (1%) sales tax was approved by voter referendum in May, 2009. These funds are transferred out to the respective capital projects in FY2012 and 2013. Other Financial Uses includes $3.8 million in funding for the 420th Street Industrial Park from undesignated General Fund cash balance in FY2012. Aid to Human Service Agencies and Community / Economic Development grant funding were moved out of this cost center with the FY2013 budget proposal. Community Event Funding is recommended at $106,200 for FY2013. Funding requests total $168,467, as summarized on the following page. - 214 - Actual FY2010 Actual FY2011 Budget FY2012 Requested FY2013 Budget FY2013 319 Music Fest - - 2,562 4,000 3,000 Backyard Abundance - - 400 - - Bike to Work Week 1,500 1,500 - 1,500 - Celebrating Ramadan - - not eligible - - Community Supported Agriculture Fair - - - - - Access 2 Independence of the Eastern Iowa Corridor, Inc. (previously Evert Conner Rights & Resource Center for Independent Living) ADA Celebration 972 1,400 - 1,300 - Corridor Black Business Committee: Congolias Independence Day - - - 6,420 - Dr Martin Luther King Day - - - 3,665 - African American History Month - - - 14,982 - Disability Awareness Month Kickoff - - - - - Eidul-Fitr Celebration - - not eligible - - Extend the Dream Foundation Ralston Creek Fair & Flea Mrkt 1,000 1,000 500 - - Free Art School: Evening Alternatives - - 1,000 - - Habeas Corpus Iowa Dance Fest & Iowa City Dance Labs - - - - - Iowa City Book Festival - - 1,500 2,500 1,000 Iowa City Community String Orchestra Fall, Spring & Summer family concerts 400 400 200 800 200 Johnson Co. Historical Society - - - - - Johnson Co. Historical Society - Irving B. Weber Days 7,790 8,500 - 4,000 - Johnson County Local Food Alliance Field to Family 1,000 1,000 - - - Jaycees - - - - - 4th of July Fireworks (City of Iowa City)22,500 25,000 25,000 25,000 23,000 Landlocked Film Festival 3,500 3,000 3,000 10,000 3,000 Mission Creek Festival 5,000 3,362 - 15,000 4,000 Phenomenal Education Lecture Event - - - 3,300 - Power Up Your Preschool - - - - - Riverside Theatre - Shakespeare Festival 4,000 5,000 7,000 7,000 5,000 Summer of the Arts:60,000 60,000 69,000 69,000 67,000 Iowa Arts Festival, Friday Night Concert Series,- - - - - Jazz Festival, Free Movie Series & Sand in the City - - - - - Contingency - - - - - 107,662$ 110,162$ 110,162 168,467 106,200 Funding Requests for Community Events & Programs Community Event / Program Funding: Community event and city sponsored event funding totals $106,200 in FY2013. Funding requests totaled $168,467. - 215 - - 216 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: ACCOUNTING MISSION STATEMENT The purpose of the Accounting and Reporting activity is to provide processing and reporting of all financial transactions for the City of Iowa City. The activity also provides financial controls for departments to help ensure proper stewardship of public funds. Accounting provides services that support management decisions through timely and accurate processing and reporting of payroll, accounts payable, accounts receivable, and cash transactions. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Process payments for goods and services and pay all vendors timely and accurately, taking advantage of any discounts offered;  Monitor the City’s debt and ensure accurate and timely principal and interest payments;  Process and distribute payroll for all City employees accurately and timely. File quarterly and annual payroll tax returns and W-2 forms accurately and timely;  Receive unqualified opinions on the City’s annual audited financial statements and compliance with requirements described in OMB Circular A-133;  Prepare a Comprehensive Annual Financial Report in conformance with GAAP that meets the requirements of the GFOA excellence in financial reporting program;  Request funds for City programs funded by Federal and State grants on a monthly basis and monitor these funds to ensure compliance with applicable laws and guidelines. - 217 - - 218 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: PURCHASING – GENERAL FUND MISSION STATEMENT To provide quality service to City departments, protect the City’s legal interests, and act responsibly on behalf of the public by maintaining the integrity of the City’s procurement system through the encouragement of open competition and the impartial and fair treatment of vendors. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Purchasing Division provides services to internal clients/staff and the general public in the following areas:  Develops and issues solicitations for the City’s procurement requirements for commodities and services – including Request for Bids, Request for Proposals, and Request for Quotes.  Administers contracts for commodity and services.  Assists with the procurement of office furniture, equipment, and supplies.  Assists with the transfer and sale of City’s Surplus Equipment, Vehicles, etc. - Participation in the State of Iowa Surplus Agreement for the sale of surplus equipment.  Administers City Procurement Card Program – Includes issuing cards, training internal clients, answering procurement card questions, and assisting with problem resolution. Administers the Information Desk and the City’s General Information Phone Line - Provides information and directions to the public regarding the City of Iowa City and the various departments and divisions within the City. Sorts and distributes incoming mail for the City’s departments and divisions. - 219 - - 220 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: REVENUE DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Revenue Division is responsible for the customer service, billing, and collection procedures for 25,500 City of Iowa City utility accounts and 200 Landfill accounts. The division also records and reconciles all City receipts and banking activity. SERVICE GOALS  Provide excellent customer service to City and Iowa City utility and landfill customers.  Provide timely and accurate billings to utility and landfill customers.  Minimize revenue written off as uncollectible.  Accurately record all customer receipts. - 221 - - 222 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: DOCUMENT SERVICES MISSION STATEMENT To offer support for City administration, departments and divisions for providing information to the public, including creation of media releases, informational and promotional materials, and social media content, as well as writing, graphic design, transcription, and other document support services. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Serve as the communications liaison between the City and the public we serve.  Integrate and provide services that relay information to the public about City programs, events, and services in a professional manner.  Support and implement new communications methods, including social media.  Provide other support services, such as transcription and word processing, for the Police and other departments for use in documentation.  Staffing changes: Effective in FY 2013, the Document Services Division will be eliminated. Two staff members will be reassigned to the City Manager’s Office as part of the new Public Information Office. Two other full time Document Services staff positions will be eliminated. - 223 - - 224 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: TORT LIABILITY Chapter 384.12 of the Iowa State Code provides municipalities within the state of Iowa the legal authority with which to levy “a tax to pay the premium costs on tort liability insurance, property insurance, and any other insurance that may be necessary in the operation of the city, the costs of a self-insurance program, the costs of a local government risk pool and amounts payable under any self- insurance program, or local government risk pool.” The Tort Liability cost center accounts for General Fund’s contribution to the Risk Management Loss Reserve; general liability, fire and casualty and workers compensation premium costs. The account is administered by the Finance Department’s Revenue and Risk Manager. Revenue: Tort Liability is supported by the Tort Levy. This tax levy was reduced for FY 2013 by 10% to $0.313 per $1,000 of taxable value. - 225 - - 226 - GOVERNMENTAL ACTIVITIES SPECIAL REVENUE FUNDS Community Development Block Grant H.O.M.E. Program Road Use Tax Street System Maintenance Flood Recovery & Mitigation Grants Energy Efficiency & Conservation Grant UniverCity Neighborhood Partnerships Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC) Employee Benefits Peninsula Apartments Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts General Rehabilitation & Improvement Program (GRIP) F Y 2 0 1 3 DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM (CDBG) MISSION STATEMENT Make assessment of community regarding jobs, housing, and service for low and moderate income residents, and use CDBG funds to fulfill identified needs. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Coordinate with local service agencies, small businesses, and lenders  Use CDBG funds to acquire property, construct new buildings, rehab existing buildings, rehab owner-occupied homes, and operate service agencies  Encourage micro-enterprise economic development Revenue: CDBG and CDBG Rehab is a federally funded program for community development. The federal entitlement for FY13 is $638,918 compared to the FY12 entitlement of $603,931, an increase of 6%. Budget projections are projected stable at $605,000 since each year’s entitlement will be received as expenses are incurred, which may take more than one year based on the construction process. Non-recurring revenues in FY11 included a one-time receipt of $2.7 million construction loan proceeds from The Housing Fellowship’s Aniston Village LP project which the state has allowed the city to retain. Fund balance includes $2 million of this extra-ordinary receipt in FY11. The remaining $700,000 of this transaction has been received in FY12 loan proceeds; however the loan proceeds revenue account was not amended so fund balance for FY12 is understated by this amount. - 227 - - 228 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: HOME PROGRAM MISSION STATEMENT Provide safe, decent, affordable housing through the HOME Investment Partnerships program. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Create and maintain affordable housing through:  Acquisition of land and buildings  Rehabilitation of existing housing  Tenant-based rental assistance  New construction of owner-occupied and rental housing Funds are budgeted during FY 2013 to support the renovation of 26 rental units through partnerships with HACAP and Charm Homes LLC. Revenue: The HOME program is a federally funded program designed to create affordable housing for low-income households. The federal entitlement for FY2013 is $385,380 compared to the FY2012 entitlement of $596,097, a decrease of 35%. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development administers the program and requires a 25% local match from participating jurisdictions. Fund Balance: The FY2013 ending fund balance is projected to be $222,438, a 69.11% increase over the estimated FY2012 ending balance. The FY2012 estimated ending fund balance of $131,534 is a 194% increase over the FY2011 ending fund balance. - 229 - - 230 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: ROAD USE TAX FUND MISSION STATEMENT The Road Use Tax Fund accounts for activity of the Streets Division. The mission of the Streets Division is to provide a high quality driving surface on city streets and bridges during all seasons of the year, and to maintain and optimize traffic control to accommodate efficient and safe traffic movement. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Street crews provide maintenance and repair of the City’s concrete, brick, and asphalt streets, street sweeping, leaf vacuuming, and snow plowing. Traffic Engineering staff coordinate and maintain street lighting and signage, traffic and pedestrian signs, traffic signals, and poles. Revenue: The Road Use Tax Fund consists of revenues collected from fuel taxes, vehicle registration and title fees, and driver’s license fees. The taxes and fees are collected by the State, with a portion distributed to local governments for the purpose of road construction, maintenance, and repair. In FY2013, Iowa City road use tax revenue is projected to be over $6.3 million, an 8.79% increase over the FY2012 estimated revenue. FY2012’s estimate is a 0.46% decrease from FY2011 revenue. Fund Balance: Road Use Tax revenue is currently insufficient to fund necessary street maintenance. The projected FY2013 ending fund balance is a $10,901 deficit, down approximately $87,000 from the estimated FY 2012 ending balance. The FY2012 estimated ending balance is down 83.5% from the FY2011 ending balance of $459,890. During FY2012, the Iowa Department of Transportation and a Citizen Advisory Commission released a report with a number of recommendations, including an increase in the motor fuel tax. The participants in the process recognized Iowa’s deteriorating roadways and the inability of current revenue streams to finance necessary maintenance. The Commission recommended reforms that would raise an additional $215 million in revenue for the State’s Road Use Tax Fund, with a portion distributed to local governments according to the current distribution formula. - 231 - Supt. Streets/Solid Waste (.65) Assistant Supt. Streets/Solid Waste TRAFFIC ENGINEERING 2 Electricians 1 Electronics Tech Senior Clerk/Typist (.50) STREET STSTEM MAINTENANCE 2 Senior M.W.s 1 M.W. III – Lead Sweeper Operator 7 M.W. IIIs - Streets 7 M.W. IIs – Streets 1 M.W. II – Signs 6 M.W. Is - Streets Senior Clerk/Typist (.50) - 232 - - 233 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: ENERGY EFFICIENCY & CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program is a federally-funded initiative intended to spur deployment of the cleanest, most economical and reliable energy efficiency and conservation technologies across the country by providing funds to state and local governments for the development, promotion, implementation, and management of energy efficiency and conservation projects and/or programs. The City of Iowa City was awarded $692,300 in November, 2009, with an expenditure deadline of November 2012. Funding is being used to retrofit 8 municipal buildings, advertise free residential energy audits, and employs one intern to track municipal utility usage. - 234 - - 235 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: UNIVERCITY NEIGHBORHOOD PARTNERSHIPS MISSION STATEMENT UniverCity Neighborhood Partnerships began in January, 2010, as a cooperative effort between the City of Iowa City and University of Iowa with a goal of restoring the balance between affordable single family homes and rental properties in neighborhoods near the U of I campus. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Administered through the City of Iowa City, this program purchases and renovates former or potential rental properties, making them made available to income-qualified homebuyers who agree to live there for a minimum of five years. Revenue: The program received appropriations of $1.25 million through I-JOBS, allowing for a maximum of $50,000 in restoration costs per property. Local banking institutions provide low-interest loans on the properties during renovation, with other administrative costs paid for by the City of Iowa City. The University of Iowa authorized a grant of $215,000 to provide down payment assistance to those purchasing the homes. Carrying costs on the properties (property taxes, insurance, utilities, and property maintenance costs) are paid by the new owner(s) at closing. Revenue includes loan proceeds for initial purchase of the property and from sale of the property to the homeowner. Likewise, program expenditures include purchase of individual properties and loan repayment from when the property is sold. The UniverCity program purchased 26 properties and sold 23 properties. Three properties are currently available. FY2013 Highlights: A proposal was submitted by staff to continue the program on a smaller scale (four or five homes) in FY13, utilizing a combination of City funds ($160,000 from General Fund) for the renovation costs and $100,000 in University of Iowa funds for down payment assistance and costs for a small repair program for landlords and homeowners. Local banking institutions will continue to provide low-interest loans for the acquisition of the properties during the renovation phase. - 236 - - 237 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: FLOOD RECOVERY AND MITIGATION GRANTS DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES This fund accounts for federal and state disaster and stimulus grants, including Jumpstart Iowa, Hazard Mitigation Grant Project (HMGP) Buyout, and Supplemental Community Development Block Grants (CDBG). Individual programs provide public assistance for business and residential flood recovery efforts, the acquisition and removal of properties within the flood plain, down payment assistance for owner-occupied affordable housing to replace the tax base lost from the buyout. Infrastructure projects related to flood protection include levees, water well head protection, and bridge and roadway elevation. The City of Iowa City’s role in the majority of grant programs is to manage pass- through grants and distribute them to Iowa City businesses and residents affected by the flood. Year-to-Date Assistance Summary:  Buyout: 85 residential properties have been acquired and 10 additional properties are expected to be acquired by May 2012. Approximately $18.5 million in grant funds has been expended for property acquisition.  Residential Rehabilitation: 106 households received assistance from state Jumpstart and federal Jumpstart grants. Approximately $3.3 million in residential rehabilitation assistance was distributed.  Business Assistance: 82 businesses were assisted with either Jumpstart Business funds or Business Rental Assistance Program funds. Approximately $2.1 in business assistance has been distributed.  Single Family New Construction: 93 owner-occupied affordable housing units have been constructed and sold. The City expects to assist 45 additional properties through this program. Approximately $4.1 million has been expended for down payment assistance. - 238 -  Infrastructure: CDBG Public Infrastructure funding, management, and monitoring is being provided for the Wastewater Treatment Facility relocation, Rocky Shore Lift Station project, construction of the East Side, West Side, and Taft Speedway Levee projects, and flood proofing protection of the water well heads at the Water Treatment Facility site. - 239 - - 240 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: EMPLOYEE BENEFITS This fund accounts for annual employee benefit costs for the General Fund and a share of Road Use Tax employees. Costs include health, dental, life and disability insurance; employer-share FICA and IPERS retirement contributions; Chapter 411 Police and Fire retirement contributions, accidental disability and on-the-job injury medical claims; and workers compensation insurance. Legal authority for the fund is established by two sections code. Iowa State Code chapter 386.6.1 provides authority for municipalities to establish a fund for the purpose of “accounting for pension and related employee benefit funds as provided by the City Finance Committee”, while also providing the authority to levy a tax in the amount necessary to meet these obligations. Chapter 545.4 of the Administrative Code of Iowa provides the City Finance Committee’s definition of eligible benefits and how they are must be accounted for. During the 2009 legislative session, a bill was passed amending section 411.l6(5)(c)(2) of the Iowa State Code. This amendment added a presumption for police and fire personnel, that any infectious disease and/or cancer is presumed to have been contracted during the performance of the duties, placing fiduciary responsibility for all related medical claims upon the employer. As with other accidental disability and on-the-job medical claims, cash reserves will be utilized to prevent a spike in the tax levy in any given year from such claims. For this reason, cash balance is recommended to be twenty-five percent (25%) of total fund expenditures. - 241 - - 242 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: TAX INCREMENT FINANCING MISSION STATEMENT Facilitate the creation of Tax Increment Financing projects consistent with the City Council’s adopted economic development goals in order to grow the property tax base and create jobs. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Tax Increment Financing (TIF) Districts have been established in various locations in Iowa City to encourage economic development. TIF revenues are used to repay debt incurred for specific projects and to pay property tax rebates on increased valuation per development-specific agreements within the districts. As TIF agreements expire and/or their legal requirements are satisfied, tax revenue generated by the incremental valuation (increase in property values for the district since it was established) is distributed to all taxing authorities. The objective of Iowa City’s TIF capacity is to provide gap financing for development projects which meet the adopted goals and criteria of the respective TIF district. Urban Renewal TIF Area (URA) Date Established Base Valuation Jan. 1, 2011 Valuation Total Increment Sycamore Mall & First Avenue 2000 22,284,430$ 36,602,870$ 14,318,440$ City University I 2001 109,554,650 200,033,840 90,479,190 Scott Six 2001 2,315,755 38,673,220 36,357,465 Northgate 2002 6,712,217 25,781,200 19,068,983 Heinz Road 2003 34,933,220 55,109,370 20,176,150 Highway 6 2003 8,745,932 12,610,980 3,865,048 Total - Iowa City:162,261,774$ 332,208,610$ 169,946,836$ Valuation - 243 - Deve indiv utiliz The since was 2012 seve more that of a proh locat A de Plan eloper agre vidual proje ed for those total increa e their ince diverted for 2 TIF Legis eral change e robust re any project alternate de ibits cities tion in the s etailed discu Status Rep eements typ ct. The fo e projects w ase in valu ption is $17 r rebate an slative Cha s were mad eporting req t using TIF evelopmen from usin same count ussion of e port, page 2 pically utiliz ollowing tab with debt ce uation of Io 70 million. d debt repa anges: Du de to TIF st quirements funds to co t and fun ng TIF ince ty or contigu each urban 28 of this d ze a base ble shows t ertified in FY owa City’s s Of this incr ayment of $ ring the 20 tatutes. Mo for increas onstruct a p ding optio entives to uous count renewal ar ocument. valuation w the base a Y2013. six existing remental va $524,651 in 12 Iowa St ost notably sed transp public facili ons, and w lure busin ty. rea can be which is sp and increme g urban ren alue, only $ n FY2013. tate legislat , these refo parency, a ty includes with some ness from e found in t pecific to th ental value newal area $11.7 millio tive session orms includ requiremen s an analysi exception an existin he Strategi he es as on n, de nt is ns ng ic - 244 - - 245 - - 246 - - 247 - METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION OF JOHNSON COUNTY MISSION STATEMENT It is the mission of the Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) of Johnson County to fulfill state and federal requirements necessary and beneficial to receive state and federal transportation capital and operating funds; to conduct transportation and traffic studies related to public and private development projects; to provide traffic data collection and analysis services, prepare and administer transportation-related grants; and serve as a body for regional policy and project-related discussions. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITES Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) designations are made by the Governor of the State of Iowa. The MPO of Johnson County services the Iowa City Urbanized Area, which includes Iowa City, Coralville, North Liberty, Tiffin, University Heights, and the University of Iowa. The MPO coordinates planning efforts for all of Johnson County in: transportation planning, data collection and analysis, and assistance to small communities. Member agencies outside of the Iowa City Urbanized Area include Johnson County, Lone Tree, Oxford, Shueyville, Solon, and Swisher. The Transportation Planning Division fulfills federal requirements involving the transportation planning process in order to maintain eligibility for grant programs through the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and Federal Highway Administration (FHA). The "3-C" transportation planning process consists of a comprehensive, coordinated and continuing planning effort for all modes of transportation. Projects include short- and long-range transportation development plans, corridor studies, intersection analyses, survey reports, and review of development projects. The Transportation Planning Division also prepares state and federal grant applications and fulfills the associated administration and regulation compliance. In past years, the MPO has also facilitated discussion on regional issues including a fire protection mutual aid agreement, joint animal control facilities, a Joint Emergency Communications Center. - 248 - Revenue: Although funding is received from all MPO members, the MPO is organized under the City of Iowa City. Through a 28(E) agreement, staff provide assistance to the other members of MPOJC. This provides for cost-effective sharing of clerical, accounting, office space and vehicle pool expenditures. Staffing changes: The MPO Human Services Coordinator position has been vacant since August 2011, and is proposed to be formally eliminated in the FY13 budget. Duties associated with this position are being distributed amongst other divisions, including Transportation Planning (Human Service Agency Transit Planning, investigation of ADA issues, SEATS eligibility verification); Community Development (Aid to Agencies coordination, assistance with grant programs); Transit (distribution of free and reduced price bus passes); and other departments that interact with human services agencies. Some duties associated with this position will be eliminated, most notably, participation on human service agency boards and committees, and maintenance and distribution of services directories and resources. Internet-based information directories, agency web sites and other local government information will help fill this gap. Elimination of this position results in a reduction 1.0 FTE. - 249 - - 250 - - 251 - - 252 - DEPARTMENT: PLANNING & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT DIVISION: GENERAL REHABILITATION & IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The General Rehabilitation and Improvement Program (GRIP) GRIP was designed to stabilize and revitalize neighborhoods through the broader applicability of Iowa City’s Housing Rehabilitation and Historic Preservation programs, by providing city-funded long-term, low-interest loans to qualifying homeowners for home maintenance and improvement projects. History: GRIP is the successor to TARP (Targeted Area Rehabilitation Program), a similar program implemented in 2001 that was offered to residents in targeted areas of the City. The success of the TARP program and the interest expressed by citizens who lived outside of the target areas led the Housing and Community Development Commission to recommend expanding the program to make it available city-wide. City Council provided formal approval of the GRIP by resolution on April 29, 2008. Funding: Prior to FY2013, this program was financed by the issuance of general obligation debt of up to $200,000, annually. Starting this year, GRIP will be financed by the General Fund. Objectives: This program is offered as a complement to the federally-funded CDBG/HOME programs by utilizing a different level of income targeting; making loans available to residents whose household earnings fall at or below 110% of the city’s median income. These low-interest loans are repayable over a 20-year period, with the money awarded to qualified homeowners on a first-come, first- serve basis. In addition to the loan, GRIP also extends the technical assistance and support of the City’s Housing Rehabilitation staff, who can help participating homeowners with remodeling ideas, assistance in choosing a contractor, and helping oversee the project’s progress. FY2013 Highlights: Program authority of $200,000 in FY2013 will be financed from General Fund cash. - 253 - - 254 - DEPARTMENT: HOUSING & INSPECTION SERVICES DIVISION: PENINSULA APARTMENTS FUND TYPE: SPECIAL REVENUE HISTORY In 2003, City Council voted to support the development of affordable housing by committing to a bond-funded $320,000 loan to The Housing Fellowship for purchase of six lots and construction of 17 housing units. Other funding for the project included an Economic Development Grant, CDBG and HOME funds. The City of Iowa City then purchased the apartment building from The Housing Fellowship upon completion. The units are now managed by the Iowa City Housing Authority, a division of the Department of Housing and Inspection Services (HIS). Revenue: Rental income is projected at $59,728 in FY 2013, up 3.8% from the estimated FY 2012 total. Fund Balance: The FY2013 ending fund balance is projected at $78,959. Cash balance will be allowed to increase until reaching $210,784. This is the amount of a lump sum payment which is due in FY2025 as part of the original financing for this project. - 255 - - 256 - GOVERNMENT ACTIVITIES DEBT SERVICE Debt Service Fund F Y 2 0 1 3 DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: DEBT SERVICE Chapter 384.4 of the Iowa State Code provides legal authority for a city to establish a debt service fund and certify taxes to be levied in the amount necessary to pay for the principal and interest on general obligation bonds issued by the city. This fund accounts for annual principal and interest payments due on general obligation debt of the City. Funding is provided by the debt service property tax levy, transfers from Water Operations, and loan repayments. FY2013 – FY2015 Financial Plan: The debt service levy for FY2013 is $4.443 per $1,000 in valuation. Future general obligation bond issues are estimated at $10.2 million in FY2013, $7.9 million in FY2014 and $3.5 million in FY2015. General Obligation Bonds, Series 2004, will be refunded on June 1, 2013, utilizing TIF monies. Debt Margin: As stated in the City's Fiscal Policy, "Debt incurred as a general obligation of the City of Iowa City shall not exceed statutory limits: presently 5% of the total assessed value of property within the corporate limits as established by the City Assessor." The following schedule and graph depict current and estimated future debt margins for the City. Property valuations for FY2014 and FY2015 are estimated at two percent (2%) growth annually. - 257 - Outstanding Debt & Allowable Debt Margin Fiscal Year Total (100%) Property Valuation Allowable Debt Margin (5% of Total Property Val.) Outstanding Debt at July 1 Debt as % of Allowable Debt Margin Outstanding Debt as a Percentage of Total Valuations FY03 2,907,341,314 145,367,066 85,260,000 59%2.9% FY04 2,960,278,057 148,013,903 83,000,000 56%2.8% FY05 3,193,203,010 159,660,151 88,985,000 56%2.8% FY06 3,294,183,749 164,709,187 85,290,000 52%2.6% FY07 3,809,062,375 190,453,119 85,060,000 45%2.2% FY08 3,930,249,676 196,512,484 85,840,000 44%2.2% FY09 4,265,444,384 213,272,219 87,090,000 41%2.0% FY10 4,377,975,516 218,898,776 84,995,000 39%1.9% FY11 4,450,783,925 222,539,196 75,050,000 34%1.7% FY12 4,521,041,432 226,052,072 80,575,000 36%1.8% FY13 4,616,107,846 230,805,392 75,320,000 33%1.6% *FY14 4,708,430,003 235,421,500 73,960,000 31%1.6% *FY15 4,802,598,603 240,129,930 70,880,000 30%1.5% * Estimate - 258 - Iowa City’s internal fiscal policy was revised in April, 2010, upon recommendation of the Finance Director to specify that the "debt service levy shall not exceed 30% of the city levy in any one fiscal year." The following chart shows the debt service levy as a percentage of the city levy rate for FY2006 through 2015. Fiscal years 2014 and 2015 are based on estimated financing requirements for capital projects and are subject to changes in other levy rates (based on operating costs) and future changes in property valuations. - 259 - Summary of Bonded Indebtedness Principal Amount Date of Final Interest Outstanding Issued Purpose Issue Maturity Rates 06/30/12 7,305,000$ Taxable-Urban Renewal Mar. 2004 2023 4.0 - 5.4 5,595,000$ 7,020,000 Multi-Purpose Mar. 2005 2015 3.0 - 4.0 2,375,000 6,265,000 Multi-Purpose Jun. 2006 2016 3.625 - 4.0 2,855,000 1,000,000 Taxable-Multi-Purpose Jun. 2006 2016 5.5 - 5.6 475,000 3,350,000 Refunded Water Construction Sep. 2006 2017 3.6 - 3.75 1,495,000 8,870,000 Multi-Purpose May 2007 2017 3.75 4,845,000 9,150,000 Multi-Purpose June 2008 2018 3.25 - 3.75 5,850,000 17,005,000 Refunded Multi-Purpose Oct. 2008 2018 3.0 - 3.75 9,350,000 6,685,000 Multi-Purpose June 2009 2019 2.5 - 4.0 4,855,000 505,000 Taxable-Urban Renewal June 2009 2014 1.5 - 3.0 205,000 5,840,000 Refunded Multi-Purpose June 2009 2016 2.0 - 4.0 3,465,000 7,420,000 Multi-Purpose Aug. 2010 2020 2.0 - 2.75 5,935,000 7,925,000 Multi-Purpose June 2011 2021 2.0 - 3.625 7,180,000 820,000 Taxable-Urban Renewal June 2011 2013 0.65 - 1.1 420,000 10,930,000 Refunded Multi-Purpose June 2011 2021 2.0 - 3.625 10,730,000 9,070,000 Multi-Purpose June 2012 2022 2.0 - 2.25 9,070,000 620,000 Taxable-Urban Renewal June 2012 2014 0.5 - 0.6 620,000 Total - Principal Outstanding as of June 30, 2012:75,320,000$ General obligation and revenue bonds payable at June 30, 2012 are comprised of the following individual issues: - 260 - - 261 - - 262 - BUSINESS TYPE ACTIVITIES Transportation Services Parking Operations Public Transit Wastewater Operations Water Operations Refuse Collection Landfill Operations Airport Stormwater Management Broadband Telecommunications Housing Authority F Y 2 0 1 3 DEPARTMENT: TRANSPORTATION SERVICES DIVISION: PARKING OPERATIONS DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Parking Structures:  The Capitol Street Parking Facility was constructed in 1980 at 220 S. Capitol Street, adjacent to Old Capitol Town Centre. It provides 875 parking spaces, with 220 parking permits issued annually.  The Dubuque Street Parking Facility was also constructed in 1980, at 220 S. Dubuque Street, adjacent to the Sheraton Hotel. It provides 625 parking spaces, with 325 parking permits issued annually. The City has annual parking contracts with Sheraton Hotel and Hotel Vetro for guest parking at this facility.  Chauncey Swan Parking Facility is located at 415 E. Washington Street, across from City Hall. This facility was built in 1993 to provide 475 parking spaces, with 400 parking permits issued annually.  Tower Place Parking Facility is a city-owned, multi-use facility. Constructed in 2001 at 335 Iowa Avenue, it contains nine condominium spaces and 511 parking spaces, with 325 parking permits issued annually. Surface Lots & On-Street Parking: Transportation Services operates and maintains six (6) surface parking lots which provide a mix of permit and metered- parking. On and off-street parking meter rates vary from $.50 to $.75 per hour, with time limits from 30 minutes to 10 hours. Surface Lots include:  Burlington Street Lot  Market Street Lot  Schuman Lot  City Hall Lot  Recreation Center Lot  Maiden Lane Lot - 263 - Parking enforcement: These duties include enforcement of the following regulations: expired meters, permit only, odd/even, commercial loading zones, 15 minute loading zones, alleys in addition to other regulatory signage. Enforcement is also necessary for hourly and permit parking in the parking lots, Chauncey Swan Parking Facility and Court Street Transportation Center located at 150 E. Court Street. FY2012 Accomplishments:  Completion of the LED lighting retrofit project. This project was partially funded through a grant from the Iowa Office of Energy Independence and has resulted in an energy usage reduction of 48% - 52% for the five parking facilities.  Replacement / renovation of elevators at the Capitol Street and Dubuque Street parking facilities. Funding / Revenue: Parking operations are funded entirely by parking revenues. This includes revenues from hourly parking, permit parking, parking meters, expired meter parking citations and other miscellaneous parking revenues. Contracts with the Sheraton Hotel and Hotel Vetro are for annual guest parking at the Dubuque Street Ramp. Revenue projections for FY2013 are based on FY2011 actuals. A parking impact fee was established in June of 1994 to provide funding for improvement of parking facilities in the Near Southside Neighborhood. Iowa City Code section 14-7B determines how these funds may be used. Approximately $2.1 million in impact fees have been applied in recent years to repayment of principal on a loan for land acquisition at the intersection of Linn and Court Streets (see FY2013 Capital Improvement Program Highlights, below). FY2013 Highlights: The following reductions in staff have occurred through attrition during the past year for a net decrease of (3.5) FTEs:  Parking Enforcement Attendants – reduced from 6.5 to 5.0 FTE due to investments in technology and resulting efficiencies  Cashiers – reduced from 12.25 to 11.25 FTE, also due to investments in technology and resulting efficiencies  Maintenance Worker I / Parking – Reduced from 4.0 to a net 3.5 following elimination of one full-time position (1.0) and reallocation of +.50 from what was previously a shared position withTransit. These changes are possible due to the privatization of some the duties.  Maintenance Worker II / Parking (Nights) – This position (1.0 FTE) was eliminated due to privatization of some of the duties. - 264 - FY2013 Capital Improvement Program Highlights: A new multi-use parking / commercial / residential facility is proposed at the intersection of Linn and Court Streets with construction to begin in FY2013. This project will provide an additional 600 parking spaces financed by parking impact fees and revenue bonds. The commercial / workforce residential component is expected to be built by a private developer. PERFORMANCE MEASURES* 2010 2011 Web Payments – Parking Citations 54.4% 59.5% Parking Citations Issued 119,039 109,555 Parking Meter Maintenance Requests 679 561 * A full performance measure report is available in Appendix A of this document. - 265 - Parking Transportation Services Director (.50) TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 3 Operations Supervisors 3 M.W. IIs PARKING 11.25 Cashiers 1 Customer Service Rep. Senior M.W. – Parking & Transit (.50) M.W. I – Transit (.50) 3.50 M.W. Is- Parking Systems 5 Parking Enforcement Attendants 1 Parking Clerk Associate Director – Trans. (.50) - 266 - - 267 - - 268 - DEPARTMENT: TRANSPORTATION SERVICES DIVISION: TRANSIT DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES Fixed Route Operations: Iowa City Transit fixed route operations include 19 routes during weekday peak service within the corporate limits of Iowa City while also servicing University Heights. Hours of service are 5:45 AM – 11:00 PM, Monday – Friday and 5:45 AM – 7:40 PM on Saturday. During peak hours, most routes operate on 30 minute headways while providing hourly service during off- peak and Saturdays. Complimentary para-transit service is provided mirroring the hours of operation of the fixed route service. These services are contracted through an agreement with Johnson County SEATS with vehicles provided by the City of Iowa City. Iowa City Transit maintains a fleet of 27 40 ft. heavy duty buses and 10 para-transit buses, all of which are ADA accessible. Court Street Transportation Center: This multi-use facility houses a 600 space parking facility and four commercial properties. This facility was FTA funded resulting in all revenues being directed to the transit fund. FY2012 Service Accomplishments / Highlights:  Representatives from Iowa City, Coralville and University of Iowa were awarded the IOWA award from the University of Iowa for Bongo transit AVL system.  Provided nearly 1.9 million rides  Received funding for nine heavy duty buses over the past two years. Six have been implemented into our fleet, three are in process.  Completed FTA triennial review  Received grant funding to replace existing farebox system  Began study to relocate transit facility. Current facility was constructed on a former dump/landfill site. - 269 - Funding / Revenue:  Transit property tax levy - Iowa State Code chapter 384.12.10 provides the legal authority for municipalities to levy “a tax for the operation and maintenance of a municipal transit system…and for creation of a reserve fund for the system…in an amount not to exceed ninety-five cents per thousand dollars of assessed value each year, when the revenues from the transit system or district are insufficient for such purposes.” Tax revenue from the FY2013 transit levy ($.95 per $1,000 of taxable valuation) is estimated at $2.8 million.  Federal Operating Assistance – Based on an MPOJC formula, funds are split between Cambus, Coralville Transit and Iowa City Transit.  State Operating Assistance  J.A.R.C. – This is a federally-funded, application-based grant.  Farebox and bus pass revenue: It has been 15 years since the last fare increase for Iowa City Transit. At that time single fares increased $0.15 to $0.75 for a one-way fare. The FY2013 budget proposal includes an increase in bus fares and passes would result in the following: Current Proposed One way fare $.75 $1.00 Off peak discount rate $.35 $.50 31-Day Pass $25.00 $32.00 Discount 31-day pass $20.00 $27.00 10-Ride Pass $6.50 $8.50 Student Semester Pass $80.00 $100.00  Court Street Transportation Facility: Parking fees are hourly ($.60 per hour) and permitted ($80 per month), with $561,247 total projected in FY2013, based on FY2011 actuals. Rent from commercial properties is projected to be $159,342, based on FY2011 actuals. FY2013 Highlights: Transit Operations will be reclassified as a business-type activity at the start of FY2013, with existing cash balances transferred out of General Fund. This change effectively eliminates an estimated $966,000 from the Employee Benefits tax levy asking, annually, as the employee benefits levy can only be utilized for General Fund and Road Use Tax Fund employee benefits per Iowa Code. Court - 270 - Street Transportation Center was constructed in FY2006 with the assistance of federal grant monies which were designated for transit-related facilities. Operating revenues were then assigned to Transit Operations within the General Fund. Since FY2008, Court Street has generated a surplus for Transit Operations, making it viable as a business-type activity in that it is primarily supported through user fees. The FY2013 budget assumes a restructuring of transit routes, privatization of the auto body repair function, and a fee increase of $.25 per ride. The last fare increase was in 1997. Bus passes and fares will increase as of July 1, 2012, as summarized below: FY2012 FY2013 One way fare $ .75 $ 1.00 Off peak discount rate $ .35 $ .50 31-Day Pass $25.00 $ 32.00 Discount 31-day pass $20.00 $ 27.00 10-Ride Pass $ 6.50 $ 8.50 Student Semester Pass $80.00 $100.00 In addition to this, Iowa City Transit will more aggressively pursue advertising, including bus wraps which could result in a substantial revenue source. A number of changes in operations that reduce operating costs will also be necessary in order to fill the funding gap left by the elimination of property tax funding. Substantial changes reflected in the FY2013 budget include:  Elimination of two positions by attrition during FY2012 : Custodian (.50) and Maintenance Worker II (1.0)  Privatization of body repair shop operations, including elimination of a Body Repair Mechanic position (1.0)  Split of MWI responsibilities between parking and transit  Elimination of one Maintenance Worker I – Transit position (1.0)  Reallocation of one half of the Maintenance Worker I – Parking position (.50) to Parking for shared responsibilities  Reallocation of one half of an Operations Supervisor position (.50) to Parking for shared responsibilities  Reduced Scheduled Overtime through improved scheduling of transit runs PERFORMANCE MEASURES* 2007 2008 2009 2010 Farebox Ratio 22% 19% 25% 24% Total Ridership 1,676,353 1,867,370 1,986,738 1,885,828 Ridership per Revenue Vehicle Mile 2.49 2.70 2.76 2.75 - 271 - Transit Transportation Service Director (.50) 3 Operations Supervisors – Trans. Services Associate Transportation Services Director (.50) TRANSIT SERVICES 37.75 Mass Transit Operators 1 Customer Service Representative PARKING/TRANSIT Senior M.W. – Parking/Transit (.50) 2 Mechanic IIIs – Transit 2 Mechanic IIs – Transit 1 M.W. II – Transit 2 M.W. Is – Transit M.W. I – Parking Systems (.50) 1 Parts/ Data Entry Clerk – Transit - 272 - - 273 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: WASTEWATER TREATMENT Public Works Director: Rick Fosse Wastewater Superintendent: Dave Elias Assistant Superintendent: Roger Overton Phone: (319) 356-5170 MISSION STATEMENT The Iowa City Wastewater Division exists in order to economically ensure the public health and safety of the citizens of Iowa City and locally protect the Iowa River as a water resource for the people of Iowa. The Division will achieve the mission by providing proper care, operation, and maintenance of City wastewater and storm water collection systems, treatment plants, and the local environment. BACKGROUND Facilities and Operations: The Wastewater Division operates and maintains two treatment plants, 17 lift stations, and 300 miles of sanitary sewer piping throughout the city, processing an average of 9.7 million gallons of wastewater per day. Staff members measure and report 120 different tests per month to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for both influent waste and treated effluent. The South Plant, located at 4366 Napoleon St. SE, was expanded in 2002 to accommodate more stringent ammonia removal standards and future growth in residential and industrial customers. Maximum flow capacity of both facilities is 42 million gallons a day. Other major work elements for this Division include sewer main repairs, preventative maintenance, and 24/7 response to emergency sewer calls. Staffing is seven days a week for operations staff. Administrative, lab, and maintenance staff are on-site five days a week. Funding: Wastewater Operations are funded by sewer user fees, per the following schedule. - 274 - SEWER FEES Minimum Monthly Charge (includes the first 100 cu. ft. used) $8.15 Each Additional 100 cu. ft. $3.99 BOD (per pound) 300 mg/L or less included in charge for 100 cu. ft. of water used BOD (per pound) from 301 mg/L to 2000 mg/L $0.28 per pound BOD (per pound) greater than 2000 mg/L $0.425 per pound Suspended Solids (SS) per pound $0.227 per pound Monthly Minimum, Unmetered User $33.36 per month Manufactured Housing Park, Monthly Minimum per lot $33.36 per month Holding Tank Waste - plus landfill fees $0.032 per gallon Holding Tank Waste Hauler - Annual Permit $907.00 per year Fund Balance: Unrestricted fund balance is projected to increase to an estimated $10.9 million by June 30, 2013 due to interest savings on the 2008, 2009 and 2010 Sewer Revenue Bond Refunding issues. Restricted fund balance for wastewater debt service is projected at $10.5 million on a cash basis. Bond covenant requirements are monitored on an accrual basis and reported in the City’s Consolidated Annual Financial Report. User fees will be re-examined once the South Plant expansion is completed. FY2013 Expenditure Highlights: There are no significant changes within the operating expenses for Wastewater Operations. Other Financial Uses is projected to decrease to $5.9 million in FY 2013 compared to $11 million in FY 2012 and estimated $9 million in FY 2014. The $5.9 million in FY 2013 represents the base level of operating transfers from operations to debt service and annual sewer mains replacements. Fiscal years 2011, 2012 and 2014 include additional funding from wastewater operations to Wastewater Capital Improvement Projects. FY2012-2016 CIP Highlights: Reconstruction of the North River Corridor Trunk Sewer is scheduled for FY2013-2014 and is to be constructed in conjunction with the Gateway project. It will replace two existing sewers with a single sewer the will be sized to the existing drainage area plus 5,700 acres of the Rapid Creek watershed north of I-80. The existing sewers were constructed in 1983 and 1936. Total project estimate is for $4.4 million, funded from Wastewater user fees. - 275 - The South Wastewater Plant Expansion project will relocate the North Wastewater Treatment Plant and consolidate operations into the South Plant by expansion of existing facilities at 4366 Napoleon Street SE. Project estimate is for $49.2 million, with funding of $32.6 million from state and federal grants, $13.6 million from Local Option Sales Tax revenue and $1.9 million from Wastewater user fees. This project will span several years and is scheduled for completion in FY2015. - 276 - Wastewater Treatment WASTEWATER TREATMENT 1 Chemist 5.70 M.W. IIs 1 M.W. I 4 TPOs Wastewater Superintendent (.50) Assistant Wastewater Superintendent WASTEWATER 1 Senior M.W. – WW Plant 1 Senior TPO 3 Maintenance Operators 1 Electrician 1 Electronics Tech. 2 Laboratory Technicians Senior Clerk/Typist (.50) WASTEWATER COLLECTION Senior M.W. (.90) 1.80 M.W. IIIs - 277 - - 278 - - 279 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: WATER Public Works Director: Rick Fosse Water Superintendent: Edward Moreno Information Coordinator: Carol Sweeting Location: 80 Stephen Atkins Drive Phone: (319) 356-5164 MISSION STATEMENT The Water Division exists to provide high quality and abundant quantity of water necessary for the residential, commercial, industrial, and firefighting needs of the city. History: The Water Division, as part of the Public Works Department, ope rates and maintains the potable water system for the City of Iowa City. Critical assets include a 16.7 million gallon per day capacity state-of-the-art water treatment facility, 261 miles of water main and appurtenances that date back to 1882, and over 25,000 service accounts that are billed monthly. 24/7 system operation is maintained to provide regulatory approved quality, at satisfactory pressures, and in quantities and rates of flow to satisfy all customer demands. State and federal regulations: Iowa City’s award-winning water exceeds all required standards set by the Environmental Protection Agency, with over 200 tests performed each day by water treatment plant operators to ensure that quality standards are met. The Division’s Consumer Confidence Report is released to the public annually and can be accessed at www.icgov.org/water. User Fees and Fund Balance: User fees are currently insufficient to cover annual operating costs. This has been allowed to continue by utilizing fund balance to cover the net loss. Fund balance is projected to be $5.5 million as of June 30, 2012, $1 million of which is expected to be used for expenditures during FY2013. Combined with the fact that there are no significant non-recurring capital projects planned in the current CIP document, the net operating loss is not a concern at this time. Fund balance will continue to be monitored in the future and user fees recommended for adjustment when necessary. Fund balance will also be augmented as FEMA reimbursements for projects undertaken after the flood of 2008 are received. - 280 - Water Division Backflow Program Building Inspector (1.0) Water Operation and Maintenance 1 Senior MW – Water Plant 1 MW I – Water Plant 1 Senior TPO 4 TPO 4 Maintenance Operators Laboratory Technician (.50) Public Info/Ed Coord (.50) Superintendent Assist. Superintendent Customer Water Service 1 Customer Service Coordinator 1 MW III 2 MW II 3 MW I 1 MW I Meter Reader 1.75 Clerks Water Distribution 1 Senior MW 2 MW III 4 MW II 1 Utilities Tech - 281 - - 282 - - 283 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: REFUSE COLLECTION Public Works Director: Rick Fosse Streets / Solid Waste Superintendent: Bud Stockman Assistant Superintendent: Rodney Walls Office Location: 1200 S. Riverside Drive Phone: (319) 356-5180 Solid Waste crews provide curbside pickup of household waste, recycling, yard waste, bulky items, and appliances to 14,806 households on a weekly basis in Iowa City. Services are provided to residential properties ranging from one to four units. In addition, Solid Waste crews provide elderly and handicap carryout service to residents whom document need. The City purchased its first automated garbage truck in 2002, making refuse collection faster, more efficient, and safer. Wheeled carts are easier to maneuver, more stable, and designed to not blow over in high winds. Lids are attached and snug-fitting to keep pests and animals out. Automated carts and recycling containers are provided free of charge to the resident. Yard waste stickers and bags are available for purchase at various locations throughout the city. Stats / Performance Measures: 2008 2009 2010 2011 Residential Refuse Collection Accounts 14,616 14,710 14,850 14,960 Refuse Tons per Year 8,834 8,657 8,869 8,969 Yard Waste Tons 1,928 1,816 1,675 1,730 Recycling Tons 1,748 1,608 1,448 1,471 Bulk Item Pickups – Total Number of Items 1599 2480 2271 2414 - 284 - Revenue: Projections for refuse collection and curbside recycling fees are based on FY2011 actual receipts, plus one percent (1%) growth annually. Following is a history of rate changes for monthly billings on refuse and recycling fees: Fund balance: Fund balance is projected to decrease by $63,543 or 13.7% in FY2013 as user fees have not increased since November 2010. Increased fuel and personnel costs will make a fee increase necessary in the new future. FY2013 Highlights: No change in user fees is recommended at this time. Fluctuating fuel costs are being monitored. Capital outlay includes 500 refuse carts, annually, for expanded use of automated trucks. Total Fiscal Year Effective Date Minimum Billing Increase Minimum Billing Increase Minimum Monthly Billing Total Increase 2002 May 2002 9.00$ 0.80$ 3.10$ 0.30$ 12.10$ 1.10$ 2006 July 2005 9.40 0.40 3.10 - 12.50 0.40 2007 July 2006 9.90 0.50 3.10 - 13.00 0.50 2008 July 2007 10.40 0.50 3.60 0.50 14.00 1.00 2009 July 2008 10.90 0.50 3.60 - 14.50 0.50 2010 July 2009 11.40 0.50 3.60 - 15.00 0.50 2011 Nov 2010 11.90 0.50 3.60 - 15.50 0.50 Refuse Recycling - 285 - Superintendent (.35) Clerk/Typist (1.0) Asst. Superintendent Streets / Solid Waste (1.0) White Goods Maint. Worker I (1.0) Yard Waste Maint. Worker III (1.0) Maint. Worker II (1.0) Maint. Worker I (1.0) Recycling Maint. Worker II (5.0) Refuse Maint.Worker II (4.0) Maint. Worker I (4.0) Refuse Collection Streets & Solid Waste Division - 286 - - 287 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: LANDFILL Public Works Director: Rick Fosse Landfill Superintendent: Dave Elias Recycling Coordinator: Jennifer Jordan Landfill Site: 3900 Hebl Avenue Eastside Recycling Facility: 2401 Scott Boulevard Phone: (319) 356-5185 MISSION STATEMENT The Iowa City Landfill and Recycling Center is committed to providing environmentally and fiscally responsible solid waste, composting, and recycling facilities while working towards significantly reducing reliance on the Landfill. The Landfill will operate in accordance with all rules and regulations of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. Facilities: The Iowa City Landfill & Recycling Center handles waste disposal, recycling, and composting for all of Johnson County. Located at 3900 Hebl Avenue SW, the Landfill is open from 7 AM to 4:30 PM Monday-Saturday, with hazardous waste accepted by appointment. In FY2007, the landfill handled over 143,000 tons of material, 103,100 tons of which was landfilled. Curbside and drop-off recycling exceeded 2,050 tons and 6,400 tons of yard waste was accepted; an estimated 2,300 tons of compost was redistributed throughout the county as a soil amendment. The City began construction of a new landfill cell in FY2009; this cell was completed in FY2012. Subsequent to completion, this cell was damaged in a fire. This event is described in the fund balance section below. The Eastside Recycling Center was completed in FY2012 and is located at 2401 Scott Boulevard. Facilities include an environmental education building, bulk water and concrete washout stations, and drop-off areas for waste oil and electronic items. The complex also provides space for the Furniture Project and Salvage Barn. Government regulations: There are numerous types of special waste which are received, but separated out for material-specific handling. This includes electronic and hazardous waste, yard waste, tires, recycled products (paper, plastics, glass, cardboard), reusable furniture, and building materials. - 288 - Electronic and Hazardous Waste: The Landfill contracts with a DNR-approved recycler to provide environmentally safe disposal and/or recycling of electronic products which contain lead and other substances that can be harmful to the environment if disposed of improperly. A Hazardous Waste Collection Facility was added in 2000 to accept used oil, old paint, batteries, household and commercial chemicals, which previously were landfilled. Yard Waste and Composting: Iowa City residents can take yard waste directly to the Landfill and deposit it at no charge. These materials are composted and made available to the public as mulch and compost. Reusable Furniture and Construction Materials: The Landfill works with organizations like Furniture Project, Habitat for Humanity’s ReStore and Salvage Barn, which divert reusable furniture and building materials from landfilling to people who can use them. Revenue Sources: Rates have remained constant since FY2000, when they were reduced.  Iowa City residents, charge per ton: $38.50  Non Iowa City residents, charge per ton: $43.50  $3 for any garbage load less than 140 pounds; approximately $0.50 for each additional 20 lb. over 140 pounds.  Special Fees: •Appliances - $12.50 per appliance; $1/cu. ft. for large commercial appliances •Asbestos (Friable - $105/cu. yd.; Non-friable - $105/ton) •Petroleum contaminated soil - $43.50/ton (3 ton minimum) •Tires - $0.07 per lb ($3 minimum) Fund Balance / Reserve Funding Requirements: As of June 20, 2012, the landfill fund balance is approximately $20.88 million. Over $14.57 million is restricted to certain uses, described below, by State code. Another $4.76 million is reserved per City policy to plan for future capacity.  Financial Assurance for Closure and Post-Closure: The State of Iowa requires that the owner/operator of a landfill set aside funds to provide for the costs associated with closing the landfill and ongoing maintenance of the closed landfill site. The City is mandated to have separate accounts with balances sufficient to provide for: the costs associated with closing the landfill in a manner that satisfies State environmental and safety requirements, including minimizing infiltration and erosion; and sufficient to provide for the costs related to post-closure requirements. Post-closure - 289 - costs include, but are not limited to: drainage and erosion control systems maintenance; groundwater to waste separation systems maintenance; gas control systems maintenance, monitoring, and reports; and groundwater and surface water monitoring systems maintenance and reports.  Solid Waste Surcharge Reserve: Landfill operators are also required to retain a portion of user fees for environmental protection, waste reduction, and recycling programs. The Solid Waste Surcharge Reserve in the landfill fund balance is reserved for these uses and is not accessible for other City projects. FUND BALANCE June 30, 2010 June 30, 2011 June 20, 2012 Restricted Landfill Assurance – Closure $4,532,434 $4,900,134 $4,900,134 Landfill Assurance – Post-Closure $8,310,045 $8,741,693 $8,741,693 Solid Waste Surcharge Reserve $905,595 $1,003,765 $921,426 Misc. Restricted Cash $14,340 $14,979 $15,771 Total Restricted $13,762,414 $14,660,572 $14,579,024 Assigned Landfill Replacement Reserve $4,420,524 $5,079,255 $4,762,428 Cash on Hand Including Cash Equivalents $11,352,451 $4,426,866 $1,540,257 Total Fund Balance $29,535,389 $24,166,693 $20,881,709 Subsequent Event: Beginning on May 26, 2012, the Iowa City landfill experienced a fire in the recently completed cell. The cell was lined with shredded tires per Iowa Department of Natural Resources recommendations to protect the clay lining and minimize infiltration. The shredded tires ignited on May 26 and the extinguishment operation was completed on June 10. The damage to the landfill cell is estimated to be between $4 million and $6 million. This fire will affect the landfill’s self-mandated replacement reserve. While the landfill fund has a high fund balance, most of this balance is reserved for closure and post-closure costs and cannot be accessed for any other reason. - 290 - Interfund Loan Repayment: Interfund loans are made from the self-mandated landfill replacement reserve to fund various City projects. As of June 30, 2012, there is approximately $4.3 million in outstanding principle to be repaid to the landfill replacement reserve. FY2012-2016 CIP Highlights: The City is collaborating on a project with the University of Iowa to utilize landfill gas for energy production at the Oakdale Campus. Iowa City’s contribution to the project is estimated at $2.0 million for gas conditioning and compression equipment. The City’s investment is expected to be recovered through the sale of landfill gas to the University, gas that would otherwise be burned off. Principal Interest Total Principal & Interest General Fund: Sr. Ctr. Envelope - FINAL in FY2014 14,667.52 7,160.12 514.24 7,674.36 Transit - Court St. Daycare FINAL in FY2015 195,591.84 54,229.24 3,418.76 57,648.00 Terry Trueblood Rec Area 111,201.83 20,290.38 4,588.86 24,879.24 Fire Station #2 Demo/Reconstruction 946,343.41 43,088.53 37,075.65 80,164.18 Fire Station #4 - (CIP #4407 estimate)1,000,000.00 33,318.45 39,399.15 72,717.60 Total General Fund:2,267,804.60 158,086.72 84,996.66 243,083.38 Airport: University of Iowa Hangar 367,860.64 14,240.82 14,457.44 28,698.26 South East T-Hanger 273,704.28 9,118.59 10,782.09 19,900.68 Corporate Hangar 521,457.35 15,419.59 20,580.41 36,000.00 South West T-Hangar 255,875.65 7,052.00 10,108.00 17,160.00 Total Airport 1,418,897.92 45,831.00 55,927.94 101,758.94 Transportation Services / Parking: Southside Parking Facility - Land Acquisition 631,472.55 172,410.42 27,677.58 200,088.00 Total All Internal Loans to be repaid to Landfill 4,318,175.07 376,328.14 168,602.18 544,930.32 FY2013 Principal Outstanding As of 06/30/12 Loan - 291 - LANDFILL 1 Environmental Coordinator 1 Senior Engineer 1.50 Scalehouse Operators 6 Landfill Operators 1 Senior M.W. 2 M.W. IIIs Senior Clerk/Typist – WW (.50) RECYCLING 1 Recycling Coordinator 1 Recycle Clerk – Landfill 1 M.W. I - Landfill Wastewater Superintendent (.50) Assistant Superintendent – Landfill Landfill - 292 - - 293 - DEPARTMENT / DIVISION: AIRPORT DEPARTMENT DESCRIPTION Iowa City’s Municipal Airport is a general aviation airport located in the southwest part of Iowa City. Of the 113 pubic airports in Iowa, the Iowa City Municipal Airport is one of the busiest general aviation airports in the state. A Fixed Base Operator on the airfield provides fuel service, aircraft maintenance, flight instruction, and charter services. The airport has approximately 30,000 take-offs and landings annually and sold just under 103,000 gallons of jet fuel and 60,000 gallons of aviation gasoline to aircraft operators in 2010. Airport staff is responsible for daily operation and maintenance of all airport facilities, including 59 T-Hangars, 6 corporate hangars, other airfield buildings, runways and equipment. The Operations Specialist staffs an administrative office, manages leased areas and contracts, plans and oversees airport-related capital improvements. Iowa City also hosts Sertoma Club’s annual Fly-in/Drive-in Breakfast fundraiser event. Funding: Airport revenue accounts for $294,000. General levy property tax support is estimated at $100,000. These funds support Airport operations and maintenance projects. Airport hangar maintenance and runway improvements are generally funded by federal grants. These projects are ninety-five percent (95%) federally funded with a five percent (5%) local match from general obligation bonds. This budget includes an apron reconstruction and connecting taxiway project; total project cost is budgeted at $1,659,500, with $1,576,525 coming from federal grants. Fund Balance: The ending fund balance for FY 2013 is projected to be $100,259, a 1.05% increase over the FY 2012 estimated ending fund balance. FY2013 Budget Proposal: This proposal includes an increase in authorized positions for Airport Operations Specialist position from .75 to 1.0 FTEs. MISSION STATEMENT/GOALS The Iowa City Municipal Airport, through the direction of the Airport Commission, will provide a safe, cost-effective general aviation airport that creates and enriches economic, educational, health care, cultural, and recreational opportunities for the greater Iowa City area. - 294 - The Airport’s goals further the City’s strategic plan goal of: Economic and Community Development. OBJECTIVES 1. Capacity Needs: o T-hangar Waiting list holds 20+ entries o Demand for hangar space for larger business class aircraft, specifically for King Air 200 series, and Citation I-IV series aircraft o Additional Aircraft parking spaces are needed during high traffic times (football weekends) 2. Budget: o Airport Operations budget is supplemented by general fund contributions. Cuts to general fund contributions would impact airport operations o Seek additional funding opportunities and steady income streams 3. Airspace: o Airspace Obstruction Mitigation projects are planned for approach ends of Runway 12 and Runway 30. 4. Maintenance: o Most buildings around airport are from 1960-1970s era. This requires a higher dollar upkeep than modern buildings. Main Terminal built in 1951. Many buildings are coming due for rehabilitation at the same time which impacts budget. 5. Public Outreach: o Seek more events and activities to host at the airport. This draws non- aviation people to the airport and increases awareness of the airport. o Communication of airport economic impact to area officials, elected and non-elected. PERFORMANCE MEASURES* 2007 2008 2009 2010 Rents (Objective #1) $218,849 $232,207 $244,045 $273,810 Based Aircraft (Objective #1) 84 84 84 84 General Levy Support (Objective #2) $159,120 $112,000 $130,000 $120,000 Fuel Flowage (Objective #5) 189,612.68 170,493.00 136,327.41 165,112.47 * A full performance measure report is available in Appendix A of this document. - 295 - - 296 - DEPARTMENT: PUBLIC WORKS DIVISION: STORMWATER MANAGEMENT MISSION STATEMENT The Iowa City Stormwater utility exists to provide safe, clean, and healthy waterways for our community. We do this by using education, outreach, community involvement, volunteers, capital projects, and enforcing our City’s Ordinances that provide for and protect our watersheds. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES In prior years, stormwater management focused on handling large quantities of water run-off in an urban environment and the prevention of flooding in low-lying areas. Storm sewers, ditches, and detention/retention ponds were built to carry stormwater away from homes and businesses during such events. In order to protect and improve valuable water resources, new federal regulations focus on the pollutants which are known to be carried by stormwater into streams and rivers. Iowa City is now required to implement various programs related to stormwater quality under a federally mandated Stormwater Permit. Management of the Stormwater utility is provided through the Engineering Division. Revenue: A 25% rate increase in stormwater user fees was recommended for each year during FY2012-FY2014. In FY 2013, this will increase user fees from $2.50/month per Equivalent Residential Unit (ERU) to $3.00/month, and is expected to generate an additional $160,000 annually. These rate increases are necessary to provide funding for stormwater capital projects including $250,000 in FY2012 for Scott Park Development and $250,000 for Lower Muscatine/Kirkwood to First Avenue. An additional $500,000 is budgeted in FY2015 for improvements to the system near Riverside Drive and the University of Iowa Arts Campus. - 297 - Fund Balance: The projected ending fund balance for FY2013 is $318,772, a 223% increase over the estimated FY2012 ending fund balance. FY2012 fund balance was used to fund the capital projects noted above. Stormwater Management Public Info. / Educ. Coordinator (.50) Sr. M.W. – Wastewater Collection (.10) M.W. II – Wastewater Collection (.30) M.W. III – Wastewater Collection (.20) Senior Engineer - 298 - - 299 - DEPARTMENT / DIVISION: BROADBAND TELECOMMUNICATIONS / CABLE TV MISSION STATEMENT The mission of the Iowa City Cable Division is to inform and educate the Iowa City community about the civic and public activities, issues and political events of local governments and community organizations; to recommend to the City Council through its Commission policies related to the regulation development and operation of cable television, broadband, and interactive systems in Iowa City, to support cable television subscribers in resolution of problems with service providers; to provide general audio/visual support to City departments and to facilitate and support other local cable channels in their efforts to provide news, information and entertainment to the Iowa City community. OBJECTIVES Broadband Telecommunications, also known as the Cable TV Division, is comprised of three units: Cable TV Administration, the Media Production Services Unit, and the Cable Programming/Interactive Services Unit. Cable TV Administration oversees the Cable Division's operations, monitors cable franchise agreement compliance, provides a complaint resolution service for citizens with the local cable company, regulates basic cable service rates, monitors the public access service contract compliance and supports other local cable television programming channels. Administration also serves as staff for the Iowa City Telecommunications Commission (ICTC), manages their official triennial review of cable provider's performance and conducts special projects such as research or community surveys. Administration also monitors changes in Federal and State laws and regulations and relevant legal decisions related to cable television, broadband or telecommunications The Media Production Services Unit produces local government and community video programming including local public meetings such as the Iowa City City Council and Foreign Relations Council meetings; balanced political programming such as League of Women Voters and other NGO forums; informational programming such as City departmental and community organizational profiles, services, projects, or activities and a wide variety of local musical public performances. - 300 - The prog servi 4's w Depa Addit Inter abou Fund non- annu impro Publ scho and C Admin .75 Cleri Division's ramming o ice providin web prese artment's d tionally the net video o ut cable ser ding: Cab exclusive f ually by the ovements ic Library f ools for Cha City Chann nistration cal Assistant Cable P on City Ch ng local vid ence includ developmen Unit opera on demand rvices in Iow ble TV is fu franchise ag e Iowa City in local pro for Channe annel 21, P nel 4. Media S 1.0 Gov 1.0 Prod .75 Spe Ass T Programmi hannel 4, deo progra ding stream nt of multim ates the ww services, D wa City. unded entir greement. y Telecomm ogramming l 10, Senio Public Acce a Productio Service vt. Programme duction Asst. ecial Projects sistant Bro Telecom Cable T Media Service ing/Interac operates c mming on ming video media progr ww.citychan Division info rely by cab A small p munication g. Eligible or Center fo ess Televisi on er oadban mmunic TV Administ Inter 1.0 Co Te a Productio es Coordina ctive Serv cable Chan demand, a o. The Un ramming a nnel4.com w ormation, a le user fee portion of th Commissio recipients or SCTV vi ion (PATV) nd cations trator ractive Serv ommunication echnician ons ator vices Unit nnel 5, an and manag nit also su and interact website wh and general es, which a his funding on as grant include th ideo progra ) Channel 1 s vice ns t schedule n interactiv ges Channe upports Cit tive training ich provide l informatio are part of is allocate t funding fo e Iowa Cit amming, th 18 and CT .13 Custodia es ve el ty g. es on a ed or ty he S an - 301 - - 302 - DEPARTMENT: HOUSING & INSPECTION SERVICES DIVISION: HOUSING AUTHORITY MISSION STATEMENT To improve quality of life, the Iowa City Housing Authority acts as a community leader for affordable housing, family self-sufficiency, and homeownership opportunities. We provide information and education, housing assistance, and public and private partnership opportunities. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES The Housing Authority is a division of the City of Iowa City established in 1969 to administer housing assistance programs throughout its jurisdiction, including all of Johnson County and portions of Iowa and Washington Counties. It currently assists approximately 1,300 low-income families to acquire and maintain affordable housing through rental and ownership programs. Rental assistance includes the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher and Public Housing Programs. Homeownership opportunities exist under the Tenant-to-Owner Program, Affordable Dream Homeownership Program, and the Section 8 Homeownership Program. Participation in all programs requires the family be within federally established income guidelines. The Housing Authority works with approximately 450 landlords. There are approximately 1214 vouchers with a total Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) contract in excess of $6 million to landlords within the Housing Authority jurisdiction. In addition, the City of Iowa City owns 81 public housing units; the Housing Authority serves as the landlord and rents these units to eligible tenants. They are low-density units scattered throughout Iowa City and were constructed to conform and blend into the existing neighborhood architecture. - 303 - The Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) develops policy, regulations, and other guidance that interprets housing legislation. Revenue: HUD allocations account for 100% of the Housing Authority’s operating budget. The Iowa City Housing Authority is projected to receive $7.7 million in federal funding through HUD in FY 2013. These monies finance programs to assist individuals and families in obtaining affordable housing. Fund Balance: The FY 2013 projected fund balance is $7,998,864; a 5.83% increase over the FY 2012 estimated ending fund balance. OBJECTIVES  Maintain lease-up rates in both the HCV and Public Housing programs.  Maintain involvement with the National Association of Housing and Rehabilitation Officials (NAHRO), Public Housing Authorities Directors Association (PHADA), to ensure that federal funding continues to fully support the Housing Choice Voucher, Public Housing, and Family Self-Sufficiency Programs.  Maintain national criminal background checks through the Iowa Department of Criminal Investigation (DCI) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).  Promote Housing Authority Mission, Priorities, and Goals and educate the general public on the administration of federal housing programs.  Seize opportunities to reduce waiting list and serve eligible families while maintaining HUD required staff/tenant caseload ratios.  Continue Good Neighbors – Strong Neighborhoods initiative and partnership with Neighborhood Services and Neighborhood Associations.  Continue working with Mediation Services and the 6th Judicial District on our “Family Council” approach to dealing with youth engaging in criminal activity that may jeopardize housing assistance.  Maintain partnership with Iowa Area Association of Realtors working together on homebuyer education projects and affordable homeownership new construction projects.  Utilize public and private forums to dispel myths and stereotypes about the households that need affordable housing.  Continue exploration of implementing direct deposit of landlord/owner HAP with the Finance Department.  Maintain a lease-up rate for the Peninsula Apartments. - 304 - Public Housing Coordinator Housing Authority Housing Administrator FSS Program Coordinator Housing Office Manager 6 Housing Program Assistants Section 8 Coordinator (.88) Housing Assistant (1.25) Housing Inspector - 305 - - 306 - INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS Equipment / Fleet Maintenance Information Technology Services (ITS) Risk Management Loss Reserves Central Services Health and Dental Insurance Reserves F Y 2 0 1 3 DEP DIVIS The oper The equip majo Curre repa gallo main depa ARTMENT SION: Equipment ate reliably Equipmen pment man or city-own ently, the D ir orders th ons of fue ntenance, a artments an General F 1 Equipme 1 Mechanic 1 Mechanic 3 Mechanic 2 Mechanic 1 Parts/Inv T: t Division e y and meet nt Division nagement s ed vehicul Division ma his past fis el for Cit and replac nd divisions Fleet Mainte ent Shop Supe c III – Day c III – Evenin c II c I ventory Clerk PU EQ MISSION xists to ens the needs o BACK n provides services (in ar equipm aintains 516 scal year. T y vehicles cement are s. E enance ervisor g Sup BLIC WOR QUIPMENT N STATEM sure that C of our staff KGROUN s repair, ncluding in ent, with t 6 vehicles The Equipm s and ou e recovere quipment perintenden RKS MENT City vehicles while minim ND preventativ itial purcha the except and major ment Divisi tside entit d by char t nt Equipme Buyer I (. s and majo mizing lifecy ve mainten ase and re tion of Tra r equipmen on dispens ties. Vehic rgebacks t ent Replac 75) or equipmen ycle cost. nance, an esale) for a ansit buses t with 3,32 sed 492,35 cle repairs to individua ement nt nd all s. 29 51 s, al - 307 - - 308 - - 309 - - 310 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (ITS) MISSION STATEMENT “In partnership with our clients, we will increase efficiency and productivity through the effective use of Information Technology” The services provided by the ITS Division include server management, legacy system management, software development, system integration, desktop computer management and support, data network design and management, website application development and management, City phone systems support, and fiber optic network design and management. DESCRIPTION OF ACTIVITIES  Provide standardization, integration, and security for City data systems  Monitor critical services for early alerting to problems  Provide 24x7 support for our clients  Maintain Disaster Recovery site for all City data  Maintain Virtual Environment to reduce hardware costs, increase efficiency of hardware in-use, and augment Disaster Recovery plan for City data  Effectively administer the Replacement Schedule to ensure technology is meeting client requirements  Support and enhance e-government services wherever possible  Protect, manage, and create redundant connections in the fiber optic network  Monitor technology changes for potential cost savings - 311 - Accomplishments and Challenges this Year  Upgraded Microsoft Exchange platform to Exchange 2010  Reduced license costs for Exchange by changing to “per-user” licensing  Continued expansion of the VMware Virtual server environment  Implemented CIMS – Cemetery Information Management Software  Developed system for Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) with MidAmerican to automate processing of 300 utility bills per month  Migrated clients to Office 2010 Professional  Implemented uniform PC rollout with software deployment via policy  Expanded VPN access (via cell card and NetMotion) for Police, Fire, Parking, Water and Wastewater.  Expanded data network to Fire Station 4 and East Side Recycling  Utilized I-80 DOT fiber for redundant connection between Fire Stations 2 and 4  Increased interoperability with JECC for Police and Fire data, as well as Fire Station Alerting  Developed “web store” for 24x7 citizen access to purchase City items online, including order fulfillment process  Developed data feed to Twitter for Snow Emergency notifications  Developed online employment applications for Fire and Police recruitment  Upgraded City phone system with new processors, latest version of software, new voice mail/auto attendant system, automated call distribution system  Added 18 VoIP phones at Fire Station 4 and 2 at East Side Recycling Center  Contracted for underground duct installation to facilitate connections from Tower Place to Cemetery, Tower Site, Fire Station 4, East Side Recycling, and I-80 DOT Fiber  Installed fiber cable (in partnership with IC Schools, University of Iowa, and Johnson County) where appropriate in route (approximately 6 miles of fiber)  Partnered with Iowa Network Services and the University of Iowa to install underground duct along Highways 1 and 6  Facilitated duct and fiber installation at Airport from Building G to Terminal  Planned with Engineering for Lower Muscatine and South Sycamore streets projects duct and fiber cable issues. - 312 - Major Issues to Address in the Near Future 1. Admins programmer retiring, creating a lack of support for legacy system applications 2. Alpha system running Admins no longer supported by HP after 12/31/11 3. Email archiving and reporting software for City Attorney to conduct information request searches 4. ERP/Time Capture, and legacy applications software project(s) 5. ProjectDox software project 6. Recware software end-of-life issues 7. Video Management project 8. Internet Service contract expiring; need for redundant connection? 9. Expansion of WiFi access to more facilities 10. Construction to connect Water Plant to I-80 Fiber – key for Dubuque St raising project 11. Inter-governmental cooperation is causing issues with IP addressing schemes 12. Rapid expansion of devices connecting to City resources (smart phones, tablets, etc.) 13. Development of applications for mobile devices 14. Re-design of current ICGOV.ORG web site. How best to accomplish? 15. Centralized PIO in the City Manager’s Office 16. North Wastewater Site – Fiber optic hub at Admin Building for all connections West, South and East. Demolition would require re-locating fiber cable. 17. Population of INS-project buried duct with fiber cable. The U of I is ready to go, and the City should install at the same time 18. South Gilbert Street fiber (from Napoleon Lift to South Wastewater) no longer accessible after Sand Road reconstruction. Staffing Changes: Effective at the start of FY 2013, an ITS staff position will be reassigned to the City Manager’s Office as part of the new Public Information Office. - 313 - - 314 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: RISK MANAGEMENT MISSION STATEMENT The Risk Management division is responsible for managing the City’s property and casualty risks and selecting prudent and cost effective solutions to minimize the financial impact of losses to the City. Risk Management also coordinates the City’s safety and OSHA programs. OBJECTIVES  To promote a safe and healthy work environment.  Reduce costs related to accidents and injuries.  Protect the resources and assets of the City of Iowa City.  Manage in an efficient manner the City’s self-insured workers’ compensation, liability, and property claims. The City is exposed to various risks of loss related to torts; theft of, damage to, and destruction of assets; workplace accidents, errors and omissions; and natural disasters. During fiscal year 1988 the City established the Loss Reserve Fund, an internal service fund, to account for and finance its uninsured risks of loss. funds pay annual premiums to the Loss Reserve Fund based on actuarial estimates of the amounts needed to pay prior- and current-year claims and to establish a reserve for catastrophic losses. Accumulated monies in the Loss Reserve Fund are available to cover the self-insured retention amounts and any uninsured losses. During the year ended June 30, 2011 the City purchased property, liability, and workers’ compensation insurance under the program that provides for a $100,000 self-insured retention per occurrence on property losses, a $500,000 self-insured retention per occurrence on liability, and a $400,000 self-insured retention on workers’ compensation losses. Liability insurance provides coverage for claims in excess of the aforementioned self-insured retention up to a maximum of $21.0 million annual aggregate of losses paid. Settled claims have not exceeded this commercial coverage in any of the past twenty four fiscal years. The Housing Authority Fund is insured under a separate policy with the Assisted Housing Risk Management Association. The remaining funds participate in the Loss Reserve Fund. - 315 - - 316 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE DIVISION: CENTRAL SERVICES/PURCHASING FUND TYPE: INTERNAL SERVICE FUND MISSION STATEMENT To provide quality service to City departments, protect the City’s legal interests, and act responsibly on behalf of the public by maintaining the integrity of the City’s procurement system through the encouragement of open competition and the impartial and fair treatment of vendors. OBJECTIVES The internal service fund of the Central Services / Purchasing Division provides services to internal clients/staff in the following areas:  Mailroom processing of outgoing City Mail, UPS, and Fed-Ex  Assists with the procurement of City copiers and maintenance contracts.  Assists with the City’s Radio System and 28 E Agreements - 317 - - 318 - DEPARTMENT: FINANCE FUND: HEALTH INSURANCE RESERVE The City maintains insurance reserves for permanent employees’ health care coverage. The health insurance plan is partially self-insured, with a stop-loss policy which provides coverage for claims in excess of $100,000 per employee. Operating funds and participating employees are charged premiums which are deposited into the Health Insurance Reserve Fund. The City reimburses a health insurance provider for actual medical costs incurred, plus a claims processing / administrative fee. The State of Iowa requires all public entities which maintain a self-funded health insurance plan file an annual certificate of compliance with the Iowa Insurance Commissioner, along with an independent actuarial opinion and financial statement which demonstrate that the plan continues to meet the requirements of Iowa Code 509A.14 & .15 as well as applicable provisions of the Iowa administrative code. FY2013 Budget Highlights: Health insurance premiums and administrative costs are projected to increase one percent (1%) in FY2013 due to a lower-than- average claims experience in recent years and increased employee contributions in fiscal years 2013 – 2015. An increase in employee contributions was negotiated in the AFSCME and Police union agreements as shown in the following table: Three percent (3%) premium increases are projected for health insurance in FY2014 and FY2015. Health Insurance Plan:FY2011 FY2012 FY2013 FY2014 FY2015 Single Deductible 200$ 350$ 350$ 350$ 500$ Family Deductible 200 350 425 450 700 Single Co-Pay 600 / 650 800 825 840 900 Family Co-Pay 600 / 650 800 950 1,100 1,450 Single Contribution/Month 20 40 40 40 40 Family Contribution/Month 60 60 70 75 80 Note: The Unions bargained for different amounts in FY2011. - 319 - - 320 - APPENDIX A Performance Measurement Snapshots Police Department Fire Department Housing & Inspection Services Dept. Library Senior Center Transportation Services Airport Operations F Y 2 0 1 3 FY2011-2012 PERFORMANCE MEASURE REPORTS This budget document contains the City’s initial departmental performance measure reports. The process of generating these reports began during the summer of 2011 with involvement from department heads, line staff, the City Manager’s Office, and Finance Department. The metrics chosen, the format in which they are presented, and their integration into the budget document will continue to be refined in the coming years. The departments for which reports are presented in this appendix include the Police Department, Fire Department, Housing and Inspection Services, the Iowa City Public Library, the Senior Center, Transportation Services, and the Iowa City Airport. The City’s goal is to conduct similar reports for every City operating division during future budget years. Future performance measurement will be guided by the City Council’s strategic plan goals. Departmental goals and objectives driven by the City’s organizational goals will be identified; each department’s performance in achieving these goals and objectives will be measured and communicated through the budget document. A - 1 City of Iowa City, Iowa Performance Reports 2011 Iowa City Police Department Performance Snapshot Sam Hargadine, Police Chief Why We Exist: The mission of the Iowa City Police Department is to protect the rights of all persons within its jurisdiction to be free from crime, to be secure in their possessions, and to live in peace. By pursuing the goals of education, prevention and enforcement, it is the primary objective of the Iowa City Police Department to pursue the ideal of a community free from crime and disorder in a fair, responsive, collaborative and professional manner. 1. Top Accomplishments and Challenges this Year Continue to transition into a new Dispatch Center and Operations. Continue to implement a new Records Management System. There was an 8% decrease in calls for service for a total of 58,726 compared to 67,609 last year. A total of 5,639 criminal charges were issued resulting in an 8% decrease from last year. A reduction in total traffic citations to 4,446 resulted in a 1% decrease from 2009. Investigated 1227 motor vehicle crashes, including 122 personal injury accidents and 1 fatality. Hired and continue to train 10 new Police Officers who replaced three long-term Police Officers and filled vacant positions. The Investigations Unit added a Juvenile Investigator to address growing problems related to juvenile crime. Records Personnel completed data entry and scanning of 10,076 incidents during 2010. This was a 10.3% increase of incidents completed for 2009. The Iowa City Police Department was re-accredited from the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement (CALEA) in March of 2011. Opened a Police Sub-Station on the southeast side of Iowa City. Worked toward securing FEMA funding and schematic design to rebuild the Iowa City Animal Shelter. Investigations: 2010 STATS 905 Cases were assigned. 930 cases were cleared (including cases assigned in previous years). 54 cases were carried over into 2011. The total number of cases assigned in 2009 was 875. 869 cases were cleared (including cases assigned in previous years but cleared in 2009). 54 cases were carried over into 2010 for investigation. Officers received in excess of 6000 hours of training, including over 3000 hours of in-house training. In 2010 Crime Prevention made 96 presentations to schools, businesses, and community groups resulting in contact with over 6,029 members of the community. Acquisition and placing into service a Crime Scene/Accident Investigation Van. 2. Major Issues to Address in the Near Future Complete the conversion to the TAC10 Records Management System, and provide adequate training to Officers to properly utilize the program. Complete building maintenance needs, including remodeling of the Police Crime Lab, Station Master Room and Police Break room. Work with Management and Staff to develop a long-range plan for a new Police Station. Fund the replacement of all vehicle cages and equipment which will become obsolete when the old style Ford Crown Vic is no longer available from the manufacturer. Secure funding for the replacement of one K-9. Securing funding for the retention of and expansion of services offered at the Police Sub-Station. A - 2 Addressing both the downtown bar scene, neighborhood house parties and the related underage drinking and intoxication related offenses. Minimizing the effects of gangs and drugs on the community. Management and staffing needs associated with Red Light cameras, if the program is implemented. Maintaining training at an acceptable level with a shrinking budget. Recruiting and hiring from a diverse applicant pool. Providing services for a growing Hispanic/Spanish speaking community. Limited or restricted access to an approved firearms range. Keeping up to date with equipment and training for computer related crime. Expanding intelligence information access (crime mapping, data analysis). Establishing strategies to free up Officer time for increasing Community Policing presence. Identify clear vision of what type of animal services the community desires. Construct new animal shelter facility. 3. General Police Data Discrepancies Performing a comparative analysis between local jurisdictions is an imperfect process. Data is influenced by differences in definitions, reporting, and collection measures. It must be noted that it is important to focus on the trends in the data between communities rather than any one specific data point. While measures have been taken to universalize and standardize the data, the trend in the data is the most valuable information provided. UNIVERSAL CRIME REPORTING (UCR 1) Crimes can be reported in various ways. The UCR system has been a standard used by police departments across the United States and is utilized by the State of Iowa as a means of reporting data. UCR1 data specifically refers to two groups of crimes: UCR 1 Property Crimes and UCR 1 Violent Crimes. The following crimes are represented in these groups: UCR 1 Property Crimes UCR 1 Violent Crimes Arson Murder/Non-Neg Manslaughter Burglary Forcible Rape Larceny Robbery Shoplifting Aggravated Assault All forms of Theft While more crimes exist, these crimes are utilized to provide an overview of workload and highlight serious crimes in a community. Even with universal reporting, actual reporting of the crimes may vary between communities A - 3 4. ICMA Performance Measures The data presented below represents the raw data collected by the Iowa City Police Department and information gathered from the Iowa Department of Public Safety. Data synthesis was based on the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) performance measurement structure. The Iowa City data has been benchmarked against the 2010 ICMA Measurement Performance Data. Specifically, the analysis and benchmarks are for communities with a population between 25k and 100k. Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Trend Comment Receipts: General Levy $7,125,869 $7,739,431 $7,806,415 $8,993,112 ↑ Increase in 2010 is due to “Employee Benefits” line item being included in General Fund. Other City Taxes $328,527 $343,866 $357,354 $316,635 ↔ Other State Grants $176,117 $166,553 $167,702 $194,171 ↔ Federal Grants - $14,090 $23,393 $12,070 ↔ Local 28E Agreements $21,138 $52,844 $67,328 $247,046 ↑ The 2010 increase is due to the City providing services that JECC currently provides to local communities. Police Services $89,988 $68,737 $50,428 $121,452 ↑ Increase is due to federal forfeitures. Fire Services $8,970 $6,665 $10,465 $9,822 ↑ Assisting on alarm calls. Code Enforcement $2,738 $2,256 $2,174 $2,354 ↔ Contributions and Donations $1,300 $1,000 - - ↓ Printed Materials $14,223 $17,484 $17,690 $17,634 ↔ Other Misc. Revenue $139,124 $118,476 $133,719 $14,680 ↓ Shifting of forfeitures to “Police Services” line item. Sale of Assets 68,400 $33,261 $50,376 $49,484 ↓ Employee Benefits Levy $1,086,488 $1,062,625 $792,524 - ↓ Employee benefits levy dissolved into the general fund levy. Total Receipts $9,087,584 $9,627,288 $9,479,580 $9,978,652 ↑ Expenditures: Personnel $7,955,623 $8,353,124 $8,281,913 $8,843,956 ↑ Services $632,440 $735,887 $751,284 $759,188 ↑ Supplies $229,610 $153,407 $130,580 $147,992 ↔ A - 4 Capital Outlay $269,911 $384,870 $315,803 $227,516 ↔ Total Expenditures $9,087,584 $9,627,288 $9,479,580 $9,978,652 ↑ Police Metrics (Raw) Number of Police Officers 73 73 75 75 ↑ Iowa City Hired Additional Officers Total Violent Crimes UCR 1 253 259 247 - ↔ Total Property Crimes UCR 1 1526 1688 1575 - ↔ Total Violent Crime Arrests UCR1 104 104 109 - ↔ Total Property Crime Arrests UCR 1 482 483 483 - ↔ Total Juvenile Violent Crime Arrests UCR 1 9 16 15 - ↑ Total Juvenile Property Crime Arrests UCR 1 114 118 96 - ↔ Total DUI Arrests 486 424 419 319 ↓ Total PAULA Arrests 1002 879 852 529 ↓ Police Synthesized Outcomes & Measures 2007 2008 2009 2010 Trend ICMA Comment Sworn Police Officers Per 1000 Population 1.09 1.07 1.10 1.10 ↑ Iowa City is below the average of 1.7 Total Violent Crimes Per 1000 Population (UCR1) 3.78 3.82 3.63 - ↔ Iowa City remains above the average of 2.91 Total Violent Crime Arrests Per 1000 Population (UCR1) 1.55 1.53 1.60 - ↔ Iowa City remains above the average of 1.21 Total Property Crimes Per 1000 Population (UCR1) 22.85 24.9 23.24 - ↔ Iowa City has remained below the national average of 33.68 Total Property Crime Arrests Per 1000 Population (UCR1) 7.21 7.12 7.12 - ↔ Iowa City is a little less than the 7.59 ICMA average. A - 5 Total Arrests of UCR 1 Offenses Per Sworn Officer 8.02 8.04 7.89 ↔ Iowa City officers are arresting more UCR offenses than the 5.00 ICMA average. Juvenile Violent Crime Arrests as a % of Total Violent Crime Arrests (UCR1) 8.6% 15.3% 13.7% ↑ Iowa City has increased to near the national ICMA average of 15.7% Juvenile Property Crime Arrests as a % of Total Property Crime Arrests (UCR1) 7.4% 6.9% 9.4% ↑ Iowa City is well below the national ICMA average of 22.6% Total DUI Arrests Per 1000 Population 7.27 6.25 6.18 4.70 ↓ Iowa City has been above the ICMA average of 5.02 but has recently dipped below that average Total DUI Arrests Per Sworn Officer 6.65 5.80 5.58 4.25 ↓ No ICMA Benchmark Total PAULA Arrests Per 1000 Population 15 12.97 12.57 7.79 ↓ No ICMA Benchmark Total PAULA Arrests Per Sworn Officer 13.72 12.04 11.36 7.05 ↓ No ICMA Benchmark 5. Iowa Metro Coalition Comparison The Metropolitan Coalition is a coalition of Iowa’s largest communities. Staff contacted city departments in each community to provide the comparison below. Coralville and North Liberty have been included but not calculated in the rankings. Metropolitan data is provided through the Department of Public Safety and is updated through 2009. Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames Cedar Rapids Council Bluffs Davenport Des Moines Dubuque Sioux City Coralville North Liberty West Des Moines AVG Population (2010) 67,862 (6) 58,965 126,326 62,630 99,685 203,433 57,637 82,684 17,269 12,200 56,609 - Metro Coalition Metrics Sworn Officers Per 1000 Population 1.10 (8) .84 1.59 1.76 1.61 1.83 1.71 1.53 1.79 .98 1.16 1.45 Total Violent Crimes Per 1000 Population (UCR1) 3.63 (6) 3.00 3.21 8.90 5.84 5.09 5.13 4.12 1.27 2.62 1.28 4.46 Total Violent Crime Arrests Per 1000 Population (UCR1) 1.60 (6) 1.81 1.54 3.76 2.76 2.61 2.61 1.41 3.24 1.80 .40 2.05 A - 6 Total Property Crimes Per 1000 Population 23.24 (9) 27.50 44.64 73.79 52.54 42.83 32.25 34.77 34.39 7.37 31.54 40.34 Total Property Crime Arrests Per 1000 Population (UCR1) 7.12 (7) 6.02 12.4 16.5 14.49 9.38 6.59 10.48 21.77 1.63 15.65 10.95 Total UCR1 Arrests Per Sworn Officer 7.89 (6) 9.2 8.72 11.46 10.6 6.54 5.3 7.74 13.9 3.5 13.77 9.02 Juvenile Violent Crime Arrests as a % of Total Violent Crime Arrests (UCR1) 13.7% (6) 9.3% 13.3% 21.7% 18.4% 15% 26.4% 31.6% 8.9% 4.5% 4.3% 18.06% Juvenile Property Crime Arrests as a % of Total Property Crime Arrests (UCR1) 9.4% (9) 27.5% 29.7% 29.4% 39.7% 33.9% 27.1% 50.8% 36.4% 30% 33.9% 31.26% Total DUI Arrests Per 1000 Population 4.70 (3) 3.74 4.61 3.16 2.46 4.65 8.58 8.28 9.03 6.88 2.13 4.7 Total DUI Arrests Per Sworn Officer 4.25 (4) 4.42 2.88 1.79 1.52 2.53 4.6 5.39 5.03 7 1.83 3.24 Police Per Capita Cost $147 (7 Tie) $120 $227 $224 $160 $244 $208 $214 $196 $92 $147 $187 % of General Fund Expenditures 21.2% (8) 24.8% 28% 34% 38.5% 36.1% 24.8% 38.3% 22.7% 18.1% 17.2% 29.2% Information based on most accurate data reflected in the budgeted, estimated, or re-estimated municipal budgets for each community 6. Metric Comparative Analysis ICMA vs. Metro Coalition Sworn Police Officers per 1000 Population Served This metric reflects the ratio of police officers relative to the population protected. This metric can be used as an indicator to baseline protection/service levels in a community. This data can be used to supplement other metrics to enhance overall understanding of service performance. ICMA Summary Iowa City remains below the average for peer communities across the country. Metro Summary Iowa City is below the metropolitan average for the ratio of police officers to the overall population. Consider: The University of Iowa provides 45 police officers to safeguard the University of Iowa. They have provided assistance in downtown Iowa City. A - 7 Total Violent Crimes (UCR P1) Per 1000 Population This number measures how many UCR 1 Violent Crimes occur per 1000 population. Higher ratios indicate more violent crimes in the community. ICMA Summary While Iowa City is lower for our metro- coalition, Iowa City remains higher nationwide for violent crimes per 1000 population but hovers around the average. Metro Summary Iowa City is below the average for violent crimes in the metro-coalition. Total Arrests of Violent Crimes (UCR P1) Per 1000 Population This metric highlights the number or arrests made for UCR 1 violent crimes in the community. Arrests made indicate a level of workload demand for Iowa City officers and assist in gauging the level of violent crimes in Iowa City. ICMA Summary Iowa City is slightly above the national average for violent crime arrests. Metro Summary At 1.60, Iowa City is below the average for violent crime arrests. Total Property Crimes (UCR1) Per 1000 Population This number measures how many UCR 1 Property Crimes occur per 1000 population. Higher ratios indicate more violent crimes in the community. ICMA Summary Iowa City, at 23, is significantly below the national average. Metro Summary Iowa City has significantly fewer UCR 1 property crimes than local peers. Total Arrests of Property Crimes (UCR 1) Per 1000 Population This metric highlights the number or arrests made for UCR 1 property crimes in the community. Arrests made indicate a level of workload demand for Iowa City officers and assist in gauging the level of property crimes in Iowa City. ICMA Summary Iowa City is about average for property crime arrests. Metro Summary Iowa City remains below the average for peer communities. Consider: Iowa City Officers are busier than the average officer in the area of violent crimes but not as busy as local communities. Consider: Iowa City Officers are arresting slightly less than the average for property crimes nationwide and has on average fewer property crimes nationwide. Locally, Iowa City is below average for both metrics. A - 8 Total UCR 1 Arrests Per Sworn Officer This metric indicates how many UCR arrests sworn officers made in 2009. The metric helps define workload per sworn officer. ICMA Summary Iowa City is moderately higher than the national average. Metro Summary Iowa City ranks 6th for number of UCR arrests in 2009. Juvenile Violent Crime Arrests as a Percentage of Total Violent Crime UCR 1 Arrests (%) This metric highlights the percentage of UCR1 Violent Crime Arrests that are performed by those being arrested as juveniles. ICMA Summary Iowa City is slightly below the national average of 15.7. Metro Summary Iowa City ranks 6th amongst the metro-coalition and is about average for violent juvenile crimes. Juvenile Property Crime Arrests as a Percentage of Total Property Crime UCR 1 Arrests (%) This metric highlights the percentage of UCR1 Property Crime Arrests that are performed by those being arrested as juveniles. ICMA Summary Iowa City is below the national average of 22.6. Metro Summary Iowa City is well below the average. Consider: Iowa City Officers are on average busier arresting people for UCR1 crimes than jurisdictions nationwide and locally. Consider: On average, Iowa City officers do not arrest as many juveniles for crimes both nationally or locally. A - 9 Prepared by: Adam Bentley Email: Adam-Bentley@Iowa-City.org Phone: (319) 356-5010 Total DUI Arrests Per 1000 Population This number indicates how many Driving Under the Influence violations occur per 1000 population. Metro Summary Iowa City ranks 3rd and is average for local communities. Total DUI Arrests Per Sworn Officer This number indicates the number of DUI arrests made per sworn officer in 2010. Iowa City is above the average but is 4th overall in the rankings. Police per Capita Costs per Resident This metric highlights how much each resident is paying for police service. The number is derived from total general fund expenditures and total police general fund expenditures. Iowa City is below average and is tied for 7th with West Des Moines. Percent of General Fund Expenditures This metric indicates how much, as a percentage, is spent on police services out of the General Fund. Iowa City ranks 8th and is below the local average by 8%. A - 10 City of Iowa City, Iowa Performance Reports 2011 Iowa City Fire Department Performance Snapshot Andy Rocca, Fire Chief Why We Exist: The mission of the Iowa City Fire Department is to protect our community by providing progressive, high quality emergency and preventive services. 1. Top Accomplishments and Challenges this Year Implemented a county-wide P25 compliant, digital 800 MHz radio system. Conducted ongoing response time analysis for improved service delivery. Developed a four district emergency response plan and updated the Johnson County Mutual Aid Box Alarm System. Employed nine additional firefighters for Fire Station 4. Opened Fire Station 4 in the northeast part of the community on October 1, 2011. Responded to 4,472 total calls for service, a 7.7% increase from the previous year. Responded to 2,535 emergency medical calls. Administered year one of the FY2011-FY2016 Strategic Plan. Fire Prevention and Operations personnel presented 350 fire and life-safety programs and conducted 2,145 fire and life-safety inspections. Implemented an electronic-based fire inspection and pre-fire planning program. Eliminated the Captain-Fire Inspector position. Video conferencing utilized to conduct continuing education for personnel and improve emergency response times. Identified potential sites for the relocation of the Training Center due to the Riverfront Crossings project. Purchased three fire apparatus: two replacement engines and one engine for Fire Station 4. Provided 1,339 hours of hours of training and education and conducted 1,619 hours of physical fitness training. 2. General Fire Data Discrepancies Performing a comparative analysis between local jurisdictions is an imperfect process. Data is influenced by differences in definitions, reporting, and collection measures. It must be noted that it is important to focus on the trends in the data between communities rather than any one specific data point. While measures have been taken to universalize and standardize the data, the trend in the data is the most valuable information provided. Broadly speaking, the physical, political, and demographic characteristics of each reporting jurisdiction influence performance. Examples include unusually good or bad weather, major budget cuts, and median household income. Citizen preferences, council or board priorities, local tax resources, and state ‐imposed spending limits cause additional variation in the resources available for providing fire and EMS services. More specifically, some of the factors that influence the comparability of fire and EMS data are: A - 11 Building stock—Industrial structures are more likely to be involved in fire or hazardous materials events. Older structures are less likely to meet current fire codes or to be equipped with fire detection and suppression systems. High‐rise structures may pose additional challenges. Geography—Street layout, terrain, the fire/EMS station locations, and traffic flow can significantly impact the ability for one jurisdiction to achieve the same level of service as another. Staffing—Jurisdictions can vary in the numbers assigned per fire apparatus, the minimum scheduled to work each day, the percentage of sworn vs. civilian staff, and the percentage of volunteers. Scope—Jurisdictions have varying levels of EMT-medical services offered by fire departments. The three levels are first responder, paramedic provisional and full paramedic EMS. Cost of service may vary depending on the degree to which different departments perform EMS services. 4. ICMA Performance Measures The data presented below represents the raw data collected by the Iowa City Fire Department and information gathered from the Iowa Department of Public Safety. Data synthesis was based on the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) performance measurement structure. The Iowa City data has been benchmarked against the 2010 ICMA Measurement Performance Data. Specifically, the analysis and benchmarks are for communities with a population between 25k and 100k. Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Trend Comment Receipts: General Levy $3,395,266 $3,670,485 $3,896,515 $4,695,652 ↑ Employee Benefits Levy is now included in the General Fund Levy. Food/Liquor License $75 - - - ↓ Service now provided by the Clerk’s Office. Federal Grants $63,800 - - - ↓ 28E Agreements $1,126,807 $1,162,923 $1,244,990 $1,244,990 ↑ Iowa City has a 28E agreement with the University of Iowa for fire protection. Fire Services $4,972 $6,898 $5,151 ↔ Printed Materials $160 $168 $81 ↓ Misc. Merchandise - $50 - ↓ Employee Benefits Levy $836,303 $802,390 $611,343 ↓ This has been dissolved into the General Fund Levy. Contributions and Donations $32,320 $525 - 220 ↓ Other Misc. Revenue $3,898 $70 $9,489 $1,978 ↔ The jumps have been from reimbursements from travel for certifications and accreditations. A - 12 Sale of Assets $30,826 $11,759 $1,590 $325 ↓ Total Receipts $5,494,427 $5,655,268 $5,739,501 $5,948,615 ↑ Expenditures: Personnel $4,831,783 $4,905,812 $4,855,601 $5,018,089 ↑ Services $301,696 $361,726 $368,517 $381,274 ↑ Supplies $136,389 $129,233 $161,082 $155,156 ↑ Capital Outlay $210,371 $187,140 $166,502 $150,339 ↔ Other Financial Uses $14,188 $71,375 187,799 $243,757 ↑ The continued increase is due to loan repayments for the fire station two remodel. This number will continue to get larger as fire station four loan repayments will come from this line item. Total Expenditures $5,494,427 $5,655,268 $5,739,501 $5,948,615 ↑ Fire Metrics (Raw) Number of Firefighters 56 56 56 56 ↔ Total Non-Fire Incidents 3,896 4,080 3,982 4,295 ↔ Total Structure Fires 89 77 59 85 ↔ Total Non- Structure Fires 158 100 114 93 ↔ Residential Building Fires 64 61 45 60 ↔ Commercial Building Fires 133 69 87 79 ↓ Industrial Building Fires 4 1 2 3 ↔ Average Response Time- Fire incident (Min) 5:22 5:34 5:43 5:30 ↔ Average Response Time- Non-Fire Incident (Min) 5:37 5:53 5:23 6:10 ↑ A - 13 Fire Synthesized Outcomes & Measures 2007 2008 2009 2010 Trend ICMA Comment Sworn Firefighters Per 1000 Population .83 .82 .82 .82 ↔ Iowa City is below the average of 1.25 but with the additional firefighters in 2011, will be closer to average (1.04). Total Residential Structure Fires per 1000 Population .95 .90 .66 .88 ↔ Iowa City is about average with ICMA communities surveyed (.89). Total Residential Structure Fires Per 1000 Residential Structure Fires - - - 3.29 - Iowa City is above the average of 2.95 for ICMA peer communities. Total Commercial/Industrial Fires Per 1000 Commercial/Industrial Structures - - - 36.09 - Iowa City is much higher than the ICMA peer community group of 8.67. Total Structure Fires Per 1000 Population 1.33 1.13 .87 1.25 ↔ Iowa City is about average, hovering around the ICMA average of 1.17. Total Non-Structure Fires Per 1000 Population 2.36 1.47 1.68 1.37 ↓ Iowa City is below the average of 2.05. Total Structure/Non- Structure Fires Per 1000 Population 3.69 2.61 2.55 2.62 ↔ Iowa City is below the average of 3.15. Total Non-Fire Incidents Per 1000 Population 58.36 60.20 58.75 63.29 ↑ Iowa City is below the average of 76.84. Fire Department Per Capita Costs $84.99 $83.45 $84.69 $87.65 ↑ Iowa City is lower than the average of $166 but will be closer to the average in FY12 due to Fire Station 4. Average Cost Per Call - $1,330 $1,381 $1,329 ↔ No ICMA Benchmark 5. Iowa Metro Coalition Comparison The Metropolitan Coalition is a coalition of Iowa’s largest communities. Staff contacted city departments in each community to provide the comparison below. Coralville and North Liberty have been included but not calculated in the rankings. Metropolitan data is provided through the Department of Public Safety and is updated through 2009. Jurisdictions provide varying levels of medical services as a part of their operation. Below are the levels provided: EMS Categories First Responder: Fire-based EMS providers that provide basic life support (BLS) and do not provide transport services to the hospital. Paramedic Provisional: Fire-based EMS providers that provide BLS and advanced life support (ALS), typically on an engine company, provided if and when a paramedic is present, and do not provide transport services to the hospital. Paramedic EMS (full EMS): Fire-based EMS providers that provide ALS services and transport patients to the hospital via an ambulance. A - 14 Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames Cedar Rapids Council Bluffs Davenport Des Moines Dubuque Sioux City Coralville North Liberty West Des Moines AVG Population (2010) 67,862 (6) 58,965 126,326 62,630 99,685 203,433 57,637 82,684 17,269 12,200 56,609 - Medical Services Provided FR FR PP PE PP PE PE PP FR FR FR - FR: First Responder PP: Paramedic Provisional PE: Paramedic EMS (Full) Metro Coalition Metrics Sworn Firefighters Per 1000 Population .82 (8) .93 1.13 1.59 1.41 - 1.52 1.36 *.17 *.16 ~.85 1.20 Total Residential Structure Fires Per 1000 Population Served .88 (5) .42 1.08 .96 .8 - .91 1.22 1.33 1.14 - .89 Total Residential Structure Fires Per 1000 Residential Structures 3.29 (2) 1.5 2.78 2.77 2.41 - 2.69 3.61 3.24 1.80 - 2.72 Total Commercial/In dustrial Structure Fires per 1000 Commercial/In dustrial Structures 36.09 (1) 23.03 17.39 4.37 16.01 - 9.52 8.46 .003 0 - 16.41 Total Structure Fires per 1000 Population 1.25 (7) 1.23 1.34 1.1 1.09 - 3.59 1.56 1.5 1.47 1.3 1.55 Total Non- Structure Fires per 1000 Population 7.89 (6) 9.2 8.72 11.46 10.6 6.54 5.3 7.74 13.9 3.5 13.77 9.02 Total Structure/Non -Structure Fires Per 1000 Population 2.62 (6) 2.96 2.43 4.29 4.13 - 5.91 2.97 4.78 2.21 - 3.61 Total Non-Fire Incidents Per 1000 Population 63.29 (4) 62.85 42.08 84.39 144.7 - 80.46 60.96 42.56 55 - 76.96 Fire Department Per Capita Costs $87 (7) $67 $125 $206 $110 $148 $144 $153 $31 $32 - $130 Average Cost Per Call $1,329 (5) $1,020 $2,827 $2,332 $744 - $1,674 $2,406 $653 $707 - $1,761 Percent of General Fund Expenditures 12.6% (8) 13.8% 15.5% 19% 26% 22% 18% 28% 3.5% 1.5% 11% 18.4% Square Miles Served 24.4 (8) 24.7 71.8 44 64.9 - 31 59 14 56 42 45.2 A - 15 Cost Per Square Mile (1,000’s) 243.7 (3) 160.3 207.8 292.5 170.3 - 268.9 215.6 38.1 69.9 146.4 213.1 General Fund Expenditures Per Square Mile .51 (3) .55 .22 .43 .40 - .58 .47 .25 .026 .26 .42 Information based on most accurate data reflected in the budgeted, estimated, or re-estimated municipal budgets for each community 6. Metric Comparative Analysis ICMA vs. Metro Coalition Total Number of Firefighters per 1000 Population Served This metric reflects the ratio of firefighters relative to the population protected. This metric can be used as an indicator to baseline protection/service levels in a community. This data can be used to supplement other metrics to enhance overall understanding of service performance. ICMA Summary Across the country, peer communities tend to have a higher firefighter/population ratio. Service levels and staffing needs are based on community needs. Having a lower or higher ratio is not exclusively indicative of the level of protection. Metro Summary In 2010, Iowa City had a smaller ratio of Firefighters to the general population. However, with the addition of nine firefighters in 2011, that number will increase. Total Number of Residential Fires per 1000 Population Served The ratio between residential structure fires and total population served provides an indication on the level of protection the fire department is offering relative to residential fires. Communities with a higher ratio have more fires per person than communities with lower ratios. ICMA Summary Iowa City has an average ratio compared to peer communities across the country. However, the City’s ratio has steadily decreased since 2007. Metro Summary Iowa City has a lower ratio compared to communities in our metro coalition. Total Number of Residential Fires per 1000 Structure Fires The ratio between residential structure fires and total residential structures indicates the workload staff assumes with relation to residential fires and how well a community prevents residential fires. ICMA Summary Iowa City has a higher ratio when compared to peer communities across the country. This indicates that Iowa City has more fires per 1000 structures than similar size communities nationwide. Metro Summary Iowa City has a relatively medium to high ratio when compared to our neighbors. Consider: Staffing levels may be different in peer communities as most communities provide either provisional or full paramedic services. Consider: Ratios can be related to the balance of residential/commercial housing, housing stock, environmental factors, and demographics. A - 16 Total Number of Commercial and Industrial Structure Fires per 1000 Commercial and Industrial Structure Fires The ratio between commercial/industrial structure fires and total commercial/industrial structures indicates the workload staff assumes with relation to commercial and industrial fires and how well a community prevents such fires. ICMA Summary Peer communities have, on average, a significantly lower ratio than Iowa City. Of the peer communities in the ICMA study, very few included large student populations relative to the total city population. Metro Summary Iowa City has the highest ratio of these fires when compared to our local neighbors. An interesting point to note is that the community with the second highest ratio is the City of Ames. Total Structure Fires per 1000 Population The ratio between structure fires and total population served provides an indication on the level of protection the fire department is offering relative to structure fires and the workload associated with structure fires. Communities with a higher ratio have more structure fires per person than communities with lower ratios. ICMA Summary Iowa City remains average with peer communities nationwide on this metric. Metro Summary Iowa City has a mid-range ratio compared to local communities. Non-Fire Related Incidents per 1000 Population The ratio between non-fire incidents and population indicates the workload our fire staff assumes when responding to emergencies/non-emergencies not relating to a fire. Examples of such a service could include medical or rescue. ICMA Summary Iowa City remains slightly below average nationwide for this metric. Many of the communities in the ICMA study provide advanced medical services that would raise this metric for such communities. Metro Summary Iowa City ranks in the middle between the metro coalition. Consider: In Iowa City, commercial property includes multi-family houses that have 3 or more rental units and apartment buildings zoned commercially. Consider: While we may be slightly below average nationwide and similar to local communities, services provided must be considered to further enhance understanding of this metric. A - 17 6. Major issues to address in the near future Development and implementation of a Human Capital/Workforce Plan Reaccreditation with the Commission on Fire Accreditation International Relocation of the Fire Training Center Relocation of Fire Station 1 Construction of Fire Station 5 in the South Planning District Ensure core programs meet jurisdictional service delivery demands and needs Prepared by: Adam Bentley Email: adam-bentley@iowa-city.org Phone: (319) 356-5010 Fire Department Per Capita Costs This metric simply measures the total general fund expenditures for the Fire Department on a per capita basis for the community. Tied with other measures, this metric provides further clarity in terms of level of service and costs. ICMA Summary Iowa City below the average for per capita costs compared to our peer communities nationwide. However, with implementation of the new fire station, Iowa City rises to just slightly below the average. Metro Summary Iowa City is the second cheapest fire department in the metro coalition. However, in 2011, Iowa City will be average for local communities in per capita costs rising from $87 to $125 per taxpayer. Average Cost Per Call This metric simply measures the total general fund expenditures for the fire department into the number of responded calls. In a comparative analysis, this highlights the per call costs between communities Metro Summary Iowa City pays relatively less per call than the majority of peer local communities. Percent of General Fund Expenditures This number compares how much the City of Iowa City spends on fire services relative to overall general fund expenditures. Iowa City ranks second to last in terms of expenditures from the general fund. Square Miles Protected/Served This is just a metric defining amount of space protected by the fire department. Iowa City has the smallest amount of protected territory to cover compared to the metro-coalition communities. Cost Per Square Mile This highlights how much Iowa City is spending per square mile protected. Higher totals indicate larger amounts of money being spent. Iowa City ranks third and is $30,000 above the average per square mile. General Fund Expenditure Per Square Mile This number compares how much the City of Iowa City spends out of its general fund for fire expenditures per protected mile. Iowa City ranks third overall for general fund expenditures per square mile. A - 18 City of Iowa City, Iowa Performance Reports 2011 Iowa City Housing and Inspection Department Performance Snapshot Doug Boothroy, Director Why We Exist: The Housing and Inspection Services Department is responsible for administering and enforcing the building codes as well as portions of the Municipal Code and local City Ordinances. This is done through the plan-checking stage and then again at the field inspection stage. The mission of the Building Inspection Division is to promote the general health, safety, and welfare of the citizens of Iowa City by assisting citizens with the code and permit process, by working with developers and contractors in achieving their goals, and by working with other City departments for a coordinated effort. We strive to achieve these goals and contribute to the overall mission of the City by: • Administration and compliance of the codes and ordinances adopted by the City of Iowa City that regulate buildings and properties located in the City. • Provide information to the public and to assist them in understanding and the application of the adopted codes and ordinances. • Insure that those individuals and companies that do business in the City meet the regulatory standards set forth in the building code and local ordinances for business and occupation in which they are operating. The mission of the Housing Inspection Division is to ensure the housing facilities are of the quality necessary to protect and promote the health, safety, and welfare of not only those persons utilizing these facilities, the general public as well. We strive to achieve these goals and contribute to the overall mission of the City by: • The inspection of all rental properties located in the City on a two year cycle. • The inspection of all housing related to the Housing Authority’s Housing Choice Voucher Program. • Investigating and resolving housing and nuisance complaints for all properties The Iowa City Housing Authority (ICHA) acts as a community leader for affordable housing, family self- sufficiency, and homeownership opportunities. We provide: Information & Education, Housing Assistance, Public & Private partnership opportunities. 1. Top Accomplishments and Challenges this Year Permits & Building Plan Review  Total value of construction in 2010 was 96 million dollars, up 21 million from 2009 but remains 22.5 million below a ten year average of 118.5 million.  Building Plan reviews completed within two (2) day average from permit application date.  Building permits issued within fifteen (15) days average from date application was received. Land Use and Site Plan Review  Site Plans were reviewed within 3 days average from date received.  Minor Site plans were approved within 28 days average from date application received.  Major Site plans approved within 45 days average from date application received. Rental Inspections  Maintained 2 year inspection cycle for all rental properties.  Added 110 properties to the rental permit roles.  1,418 housing assistance inspections conducted for the Housing Authority.  98.6 % of rental cases brought into voluntary compliance. A - 19 Code Enforcement  Maintained less than two day average to respond to complaints from date complaint received.  Maintained less than fourteen (14) days average to gain compliance from date complaint was received.  Voluntary compliance on 84% of Complaint cases.  Implemented Temporary Use permit for Iowa football home game vendors.  Administered the acquisition, nuisance abatement and sale of two abandoned properties. Iowa City Housing Authority  Maintained a minimum 98% lease-up rate for both the Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) and Public Housing programs.  Achieved High Performance status for both programs.  Utilized public and private forums to dispel myths and stereotypes about the households that need affordable housing. Met with the new Iowa City Community School District Superintendent, who then arranged for the Housing Authority to address the District Parents Organization.  Completed with Cable TV a short program providing “Who We Are and What We Do” information; will develop a more detailed program, designed to “Tell the Housing Authority’s Story” (a multi - segment program).  Partnered with the Domestic Violence Intervention Project (DVIP) to use Tenant Based Rental Assistance (TBRA) funds to assist 4 families in their Transitional Housing Opportunities for victims of domestic violence.  Maintained a 90% lease-up rate (100% for the 5 1-bedroom and 4 2-bedroom units) for the Peninsula Apartments.  Peninsula Apartments revenues exceed expenses.  Finding suitable tenants for the 3-bedroom unit in Peninsula Apartments. 2. Major Issues to Address in the Near Future  Adopt the 2012 International Codes o Review new requirement to protect light weight construction materials. o Review requirement to install fire suppression in all newly constructed homes.  Monitor State Electrical Code adoption and verify local electrical code compliance.  Conduct ongoing analysis for improved service delivery  Monitor state trade licensing requirements and verify local trade licensing is compliant  Update of technology to increase efficiency and enhance customer service. o Allow electronic submittals of plan documents o Scanning of subdivisions files to make accessible electronically. o Activate process to allow inspection activities to be emailed to clients after each inspection.  Continue to monitor all available resources to find over -occupied rentals and properties rented without permits.  Expand pro-active neighborhood code enforcement efforts.  Increase the use of technology to allow for in the field case entry and reporting.  Increase the use of e-mail to send inspection reports and rental permits to property managers and owners.  Maintain lease-up rates in both the HCV and Public Housing programs. A - 20  Maintain involvement with the National Association of Housing and Rehabilitation Officials (NAHRO), Public Housing Authorities Directors Association (PHADA), to ensure that Federal funding continues to fully support the Housing Choice Voucher, Public Housing, and Family Self - Sufficiency programs.  Maintain involvement with Iowa Home Ownership Education Project (IHOEP).  Maintain National criminal background checks through the Iowa Department of Criminal Investigation (DCI) and Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).  Increase efforts to cooperate with local law enforcement agencies, including participating in the MATS 2012 training; specifically, building a stronger relationship with Coralville, North Liberty, and the Johnson County Sheriff.  Promote Housing Authority Mission, Priorities, and Goals and educate the general public on the administration of Federal Housing programs.  Seize opportunities to reduce waiting list and serve eligible families while maintaining Housing and Urban Development (HUD) required staff/tenant caseload ratios.  Continue Good Neighbors – Strong Neighborhoods initiative and Partnership with Neighborhood Services and Neighborhood Associations.  Continue working with Mediation Services and the 6th Judicial District on our “Family Council” approach to dealing with youth engaging in criminal activity that may jeopardize housing assistance.  Maintain partnership with Iowa Area Association of Realtors working together on Homebuyer Education projects and Affordable Homeownership New Construction projects.  Utilize public and private forums to dispel myths and stereotypes about the households that need affordable housing.  Continue exploration of implementing direct depo sit of landlord/owner Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) with the Finance Department.  Maintain a 90% lease-up rate (100% for the 5 1-bedroom and 4 2-bedroom units) for the Peninsula Apartments.  Find suitable tenants for the 3-bedroom unit in Peninsula Apartments. 3. General HIS Data Discrepancies Performing a comparative analysis between local jurisdictions is an imperfect process. Data are influenced by differences in definitions, reporting, and collection measures. It must be noted that it is important to focus on the trends in the data between communities rather than any one specific data point. While measures have been taken to universalize and standardize the data, the trend in the data is the most valuable information provided. More specifically, some of the factors that influence the comparability of HIS data are:  The ability for communities to collect data and maintain records of data (ex. Some track CY others track FY).  Differences in the services offered and reported by similar departments (the degree to which these functions are executed are very diverse).  How services are highlighted in the budget document.  Staff worked to universalize the data; however, some communities had very fractured systems; this required staff to execute latitude in combining services and budgets. A - 21 4. ICMA Performance Measures The data presented below represents the raw data collected by the Iowa City Housing and Inspection Services Department. Data synthesis was based on the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) performance measurement structure. The Iowa City data has been benchmarked against the 2010 ICMA Measurement Performance Data. Specifically, the analysis and benchmarks are for communities with a population between 25k and 100k. Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Trend Comment Receipts: HIS Department Administration General Levy $294,284 $309,029 $307,271 257,635 ↔ Bldg and Development $350 $750 $1,050 $1,900 ↑ Code Enforcement $5,378 $5,092 $7,858 $16,368 ↑ Heavy snow season in 2010 Printed Materials $139 $412 $218 $44 ↑ Other Misc. Revenue $10 $111 $218 $895 ↑ Total Receipts $300,161 $315,394 $316,492 $277,112 ↔ Housing Inspections General Levy $77,832 $52,565 $73,516 ($8,797) ↓ Misc. Permits and Licenses $480 $320 $720 $880 ↑ Construction Permit and Inspection Fees $354,002 $377,064 $375,792 $460,388 ↑ Printed Materials $129 $93 $30 $33 ↔ Other Misc. Revenue - - - $335 ↑ Total Receipts $432,443 $430,042 $450,058 $452,839 ↑ Building Inspection General Use Permits $12,856 $15,679 $9,871 $7,098 ↓ Food and Liquor License $145 $135 $141 $107 ↔ Misc. Permits and Licenses $1,530 $1,450 $1,930 $1,815 ↑ Professional Licenses $59,095 $63,855 $34,799 $7,025 ↓ Construction Permit and $786,716 $638,730 $664,687 $535,749 ↓ A - 22 Inspection Fees Misc. License and Permits $210 $830 $290 - ↓ Local Government 28E Agreements - $1,502 $1,411 $2,534 ↑ Building and Development $292,562 $355,360 $288,339 $251,929 ↓ Printed Materials $927 $1,173 $1,054 $465 ↓ Other Misc. Revenue - $55 $4,288 $1,089 ↑ Interest Revenues - - $446 $449 ↔ Sale of Assets - $76 - - ↓ Loans - - $8,862 $11,376 ↑ The A2 Occupancy Program-Loan Payments Total Receipts $1,154,041 $1,078,845 $1,016,139 $819,636 ↓ Housing Authority Federal Intergov. Revenue $7,192,364 $6,307,111 $6,643,329 $7,793,433 ↔ Increase due to American Renewal/Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Contributions and Donations $1,161 $4,669 $1,051 - ↓ Other Misc. Revenue $75,187 $36,965 $85,662 $148,182 ↑ Increase due to the Tenant to Own Program (TOPS) Interest Revenue $272,572 $281,031 $139,537 $89,408 ↓ Rents $138,711 $145,438 $179,485 $180,311 ↑ Royalties and Commissions $21,851 $24,354 $23,287 $29,030 ↑ Sale of Assets $777,787 $331,658 $1,935 $412,159 ↑ Sold a building Misc. Transfers In $1,506 $245,080 $49,525 $45,055 ↑ Loans $85,788 67,583 $97,462 $570,805 ↑ Broadway Mortgage Refinance Total Receipts $8,566,927 $7,443,902 $7,222,623 $9,268,383 ↑ A - 23 Expenditures: HIS Department Administration Personnel $243,986 $253,672 $307,271 $223,272 ↔ Relocation of Support Staff Services $50,618 $61,591 $57,777 $53,137 ↔ Supplies $545 - $929 $193 ↔ Capital Outlay $5,012 $131 - $510 ↓ Total Expenditures $300,161 $315,394 $316,492 $277,112 ↔ Housing Inspection Personnel $344,981 $365,802 $365,557 $393,092 ↑ Services $53,030 $62,615 $76,984 $56,767 ↑ Supplies $1,502 $1,625 $7,517 $2,980 ↑ Capital Outlay $32,930 - - - ↓ Total Expenditures $432,443 $430,042 $450,058 $452,839 ↑ Building Inspection Personnel $532,332 $550,702 $542,784 $608,062 ↑ Relocation of Support Staff Services $79,580 $133,197 $198,032 $130,338 ↑ Supplies $12,006 $14,828 $14,355 $8,614 ↑ Capital Outlay $1,219 $1,226 $17,825 - ↑ Total Expenditures $625,137 $699,953 $772,996 $747,014 ↑ Housing Authority Personnel $833,493 $862,510 $902,423 $933,482 ↑ Services 6,383,275 $6,358,736 $6,080,004 $6,951,261 ↑ Supplies $8,414 $11,562 $9,126 $10,958 ↔ Capital Outlay $230,774 $497,909 399,433 $164,106 ↔ Land Acquisition Other Financial Uses $1,506 - - $18,000 ↑ Total Expenditures $7,457,462 $7,730,717 $7,390,986 $8,077,807 ↑ A - 24 Building Inspection Metrics Outcomes & Measures 2007 2008 2009 2010 Trend Trend Comment Building Permits Issued 744 889 704 779 ↔ Electrical Permits Issues 346 555 322 326 ↔ Plumbing Permits Issued 175 230 120 107 ↓ Mechanical Permits Issued 157 185 116 238 ↑ Construction Site Run-Off Permits 162 149 140 117 ↓ Demolition Permits Issued 27 19 47 74 ↑ Fire Sprinkler Permits 50 69 50 42 ↔ Fire Alarm Permits 8 45 53 45 ↔ Sign Permits 247 192 118 160 ↓ Flood Plan Development Permits 22 107 48 33 ↑ Liquor Permits 155 155 155 155 ↔ Moving Permits 7 4 1 1 ↓ Temporary Use Permits 19 22 13 16 ↓ Construction Permits Issued 2,457 2,945 2,172 2,384 ↔ Site Plan Development Reviews 33 44 31 20 ↔ Backflow Prevention Cases 85 70 78 59 ↓ Water Tap Applications 202 194 162 192 ↔ Water Hydrant Connections 18 16 14 20 ↔ Single Family Dwellings 133 114 127 108 ↓ A - 25 Duplex Dwelling Units 26 16 10 8 ↓ Multi-Family Dwelling Unites 83 141 71 80 ↔ Total Building Permits Issued Per 1000 Population Total Permit Issued Per FTE Housing Inspection Metrics Outcomes & Measures 2007 2008 2009 2010 Trend Trend Comment Active Rental Permits 3,529 3,584 3,658 3,768 ↑ Total Rental Units 16,310 16,437 16,591 16,780 ↔ Housing Assistants Units Inspected 1,418 1,468 ↔ Total Inspection Activity Related to Rental Unit and Housing Authority Inspections - 15,326 15,483 16,465 ↔ Percent of Rental Voluntary Compliance 98.9% 98.5% 98% 98.6% ↔ Housing Code Complaint Cases Related to Criminal Complain Cases 175 179 172 219 ↔ Zoning/Nuisance Complaints 2,194 2,026 2,053 2,140 ↔ Snow Complaints 1,194 986 790 788 ↓ Weed Complaints 346 333 345 412 ↔ Junk/Salvage Complaints 114 117 200 165 ↑ Other Complaints 540 590 718 775 ↑ Citation Complaints 47 52 101 69 ↑ Prepared by: Adam Bentley Email: Adam-Bentley@Iowa-City.org Phone: (319) 356-5010 A - 26 City of Iowa City, Iowa Performance Reports 2011 Iowa City Public Library Performance Snapshot Susan Craig, Library Director Why We Exist: The Iowa City Public Library is an innovative and responsive community center that supports lifelong learning, literacy, and access to the world of ideas. Strategic Plan Goals: Make the Library easier to use and more accessible. Improve visibility and awareness of library services, programs and collections. Develop partnerships that build community and support the Library’s mission. Provide resources that inform, entertain, engage and inspire. 1. Top Accomplishments and Challenges this Year Adopted a facilities master plan after studying community needs for remote service locations as well as layout and operations of main library. Circulated 1,577,730 materials, all time circulation record. 768,033 library building visits. Finalized contract with the University of Iowa to provide access to children’s literature materials. Provided orientation and tours to Department of Education and School of Library and Information Science students and faculty. Expanded delivery of children’s early literacy programming outside the building (327 programs for 7,404 children.) Improved customer service through cross-training of staff, offering more options to renew materials, adding a self-checkout station in the Children’s Room, and redesigning the public access catalog to make it easier to use and to improve visibility of premium databases. Expanded use of social media including Facebook and Twitter. Partnered with Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature on various projects, including BookMarks. Offered more technology assistance to patrons through partnerships with the Johnson County Livable Communities to provide Senior Tech Zone, and Library staff offered assistance to walk-in patrons at Tech Help- Tuesdays. Increased offerings of downloadable audio and e-books. Saw increases in circulation of 107% for electronic materials. Began a pilot project in March to stream video programming. By June 30, 2011, there were 1,176 views of 40 programs. Reorganized library departments to better reflect community needs and improve service. 2. Major Issues to Address in the Near Future Implement recommendation of the new facility plan including work in the main building and opening a public access computer center in the Police substation at Pepperwood Plaza. Identify core competencies and train staff in order to improve customer service. Plan and deliver major programming initiatives with the Johnson County Civil War Sesquicentennial Committee, Dan Gable Museum, and Iowa City UNESCO City of Literature. Offer Iowa Workforce Development software and assist users. Work with the Iowa City Public Library Friends Foundation to set and accomplish fundraising goals. Plan program to offer downloadable access to the work of local musicians. Expand technology support for the public. A - 27 Continue to offer collections users want and need in a variety of formats. Improve public access to the internet and technology training. Raise awareness of library programs and services. Identify and work with partners to provide support for children who struggle with reading. 3. ICMA Performance Measures The data presented below was collected by the Iowa City Public Library. Data synthesis was based on the International City/County Management Association (ICMA) performance measurement structure. The Iowa City data has been benchmarked against the 2010 ICMA Performance Measurement Data. Specifically, the analysis and benchmarks are for communities with a population between 25k and 100k. Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend ICMA Comment Operating Revenue: City Revenue $3,843,675 $4,002,757 $4,189,162 $4,415,502 ↑ ICPL’s revenues have increased gradually and significantly, while the percentage of total revenue provided by the City has fallen slightly. City Revenue per Capita $57.56 $59.07 $61.82 $65.07 ↑ Total Revenue $4,849,492 $5,109,824 $5,283,812 $5,681,875 ↑ Total Revenue per Capita $72.62 $75.40 $77.97 $83.73 ↑ Operating Expenditures: Total Collection Expenditures $572,223 $608,928 $621,044 $676,169 ↑ ICPL’s per capita operating expenditures of $85.45 are 2.5 times higher than the 2010 peer group average of $32.91. This should be analyzed in conjunction with circulation and registered borrower data, which are also very high for ICPL. Total Collection Expenditures per Capita $8.57 $8.99 $9.16 $9.96 ↑ Total Operating Expenditures $4,763,672 $5,307,079 $5,283,812 $5,798,743 ↑ Total Operating Expenditures per Capita $71.34 $78.31 $77.97 $85.45 ↑ Services: Circulation per Capita 20.91 21.61 22.49 22.30 ↑ Circulation per capita of 22.30 is significantly higher than ICMA’s 2010 peer group average of 12.3. Visits per capita of 11.00 are also much greater than the peer group average of 7.4. ICPL has as many registered borrowers as Iowa City has residents, much higher than the ICMA average of 65%. This may help explain Library Visits 680,568 716,412 745,077 746,556 ↑ Library Visits per Capita 10.19 10.57 10.99 11.00 ↑ Registered Borrowers 64,141 65,786 66,539 67,892 ↑ Borrowers as % of Population 96.1% 97.1% 98.2% 100.0% ↑ A - 28 Outcomes & Measures 2007 2008 2009 2010 Trend ICMA Comment Reference Transactions 88,084 85,079 85,131 81,298 ↓ higher circulation, staff size, and operations expenditures. ICPL has a high number of borrowers that live outside of Iowa City. 71% of registered borrowers are City residents. Public Internet Terminals 44 48 46 46 ↔ Internet Terminal Users 134,888 132,080 131,300 123,636 ↓ Employees: FTE Total Staff 60.55 65.20 65.00 66.53 ↔ ICPL’s FTE staff per capita is significantly higher than the 2010 peer group average of 0.53. FTE MLS 14.90 14.90 14.90 14.90 ↔ FTE per Capita (per 1,000) 0.91 0.96 0.96 0.98 ↔ Collections: Total Collection 241,533 240,622 228,904 225,622 ↔ Total collection size has diminished slightly; this reduction will likely become more rapid as electronic materials become more prevalent. Total Collection per Capita 3.62 3.55 3.38 3.32 ↓ Serial Subscriptions 546 514 522 527 ↔ 3. General Library Data Discrepancies Performing a comparative analysis between local jurisdictions is an imperfect process. Data is influenced by differences in definitions, reporting, and collection measures. It must be noted that it is important to focus on the trends in the data between communities rather than any one specific data point. While measures have been taken to universalize and standardize the data, the trend in the data is the most valuable information provided. More specifically, some of the factors that influence the comparability of Library data are: Nonresident borrower ratio—The ratio of resident to nonresident borrowers can influence funding for materials acquisition and program planning. Generally, jurisdictions are more inclined to fund materials and programming for their own residents. Some variation in the number of borrowers may be attributed to the frequency with which jurisdictions purge their borrower records. All other conditions being equal, jurisdictions that purge records frequently tend to report fewer registered borrowers than jurisdictions that purge infrequently. Because some jurisdictions provide library services to neighboring jurisdictions by means of contract or other official agreement, the size of the service area may be larger than the population of the jurisdiction. Variations in library expenditures may be attributed to differences in the number of library facilities, the hours of operation, and the size and scope of holdings and programs. Also possibly influencing expenditure levels is citizen demand for library services —traditional library services such as book loans and reference assistance as well as less traditional library‐based services such as Internet access, adult literacy programs, teen “coffee house” sessions, and more. Some differences in the number of items circulated during the reporting period may be attributed to the size of a jurisdiction’s library collection and the proportion of the collection that circulates outside the library. For example, an increasing number of jurisdictions offer access (both in‐library and remote) to substantial electronic holdings that do not circulate outside the library per se and, therefore, may no 3. General Library Data Discrepancies Performing a comparative analysis between local jurisdictions is an imperfect process. Data are influenced by differences in definitions, reporting, and collection measures. It must be noted that it is important to focus on the trends in the data between communities rather than any one specific data point. While measures have been taken to universalize and standardize the data, the trend in the data is the most valuable information provided. More specifically, some of the factors that influence the comparability of Library data are: Nonresident borrower ratio: The ratio of resident to nonresident borrowers can influence funding for materials acquisition and program planning. Generally, jurisdictions are more inclined to fund materials and programming for their own residents. Some variation in the number of borrowers may be attributed to the frequency with which jurisdictions purge their borrower records. All other conditions being equal, jurisdictions that purge records frequently tend to report fewer registered borrowers than jurisdictions that purge infrequently. Because some jurisdictions provide library services to neighboring jurisdictions by means of contract or other official agreement, the size of the service area may be larger than the population of the jurisdiction. Variations in library expenditures may be attributed to differences in the number of library facilities, the hours of operation, and the size and scope of holdings and programs. Also possibly influencing expenditure levels is citizen demand for library services; traditional library services such as book loans and reference assistance as well as less traditional library‐based services such as Internet access, adult literacy programs, and more. Some differences in the number of items circulated during the reporting period may be attributed to the size of a jurisdiction’s library collection and the proportion of the collection that circulates outside the library. For example, an increasing number of jurisdictions offer access (both in‐library and remote) to substantial electronic holdings that do not circulate outside the library per se and, therefore, may not be reflected in circulation statistics. A - 29 4. Iowa Urban Public Libraries (IUPLA) Comparison The data presented below represent performance measures from the Iowa Urban Public Libraries members; these are the public libraries from Iowa’s largest communities. Population for each city is based on 2010 Census data; the populations of contracting cities and outlying rural areas are not included. This can affect per capita analyses; it is important to analyze data with respect to a library’s level of registered borrowers. Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames Cedar Rapids Council Bluffs Davenport Des Moines Dubuque Sioux City Waterloo Population (2010) 67,862 (6) 58,965 126,326 62,630 99,685 203,433 57,637 82,684 68,406 Employees FTE 66.53 (2) 44.35 44.10 24.41 65.40 94.93 28.73 35.20 30.53 MLS in FTE 15 (3) 8 12 7 17 29 9 6 4 FTE per Capita (per 1,000) 0.98 (1) 0.75 0.35 0.39 0.66 0.47 0.50 0.43 0.45 Borrowers Total Registered Borrowers 67,892 (2) 34,202 58,478 51,072 45,703 167,795 43,172 52,007 47,599 Registered Borrowers per Capita 1.00 (1) 0.58 0.46 0.82 0.46 0.82 0.75 0.63 0.70 Expenditures per Registered Borrower $85.41 (3) $96.64 $73.04 $42.48 $92.69 $44.58 $57.58 $51.66 $47.32 Receipts City Appropriation $3,737,718 (2) $3,188,615 $3,409,423 $1,738,490 $3,093,506 $6,725,210 $2,485,652 $2,576,947 $1,584,149 City Income Received from Special Levies $677,784 (2) $0 $203,000 $0 $990,042 $0 $0 $0 $530,196 Per Capita City Appropriation $55.08 (1) $54.08 $26.99 $27.94 $31.03 $33.06 $43.13 $31.17 $23.16 County $381,180 (1) $125,528 $85,826 $195,352 $0 $60,056 $0 $0 $59,721 Federal Assistance $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 State Revenues $99,749 (2) $80,715 $77,280 $29,791 $55,034 $127,756 $41,712 $58,272 $60,354 Fines/Fees $236,630 (2) $116,697 $80,987 $86,722 $49,358 $438,243 $77,042 $79,593 $41,147 Endowments and Gifts $226,848 (1) $101,893 $113,697 $157,574 $43,212 $172,335 $4,223 $65,953 $138,949 Other $321,966 (1) $54,256 $146,085 $168,614 $5,0000 $143,805 $58,750 $29,709 $103,501 A - 30 Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames Cedar Rapids Council Bluffs Davenport Des Moines Dubuque Sioux City Waterloo Total Receipts $5,681,875 (2) $3,667,704 $4,116,298 $2,376,543 $4,236,152 $7,667,405 $2,667,379 $2,810,474 $2,518,017 Per Capita Total Income $83.73 (1) $62.20 $32.58 $38.19 $42.50 $37.69 $46.28 $33.99 $36.81 Expenditures Total Expenditures $5,798,743 (2) $3,305,438 $4,271,101 $2,169,707 $4,446,573 $7,480,332 $2,485,652 $2,686,758 $2,252,582 Salaries $2,987,137 (2) $1,901,394 $2,180,730 $1,011,206 $2,187,962 $4,088,185 $1,348,784 $1,413,043 $1,295,858 Benefits $842,526 (2) $502,588 $776,161 $282,407 $838,444 $1,495,571 $346,764 $543,245 $462,068 Personnel Costs per FTE $57,563 (5) $54,205 $67,050 $52,995 $46,275 $58,820 $59,017 $55,576 $57,580 Benefits as a % of Personnel Costs 22.0% (6) 20.9% 26.2% 21.8% 27.7% 26.8% 20.5% 27.8% 26.3% Personnel Costs as a % of Total Expenditures 66.0% (8) 72.7% 69.2% 59.6% 68.1% 74.6% 68.2% 72.8% 78.0% Expenditures – Materials Total Material Expenditures $676,169 (2) $405,798 $478,000 $363,903 $500,000 $764,238 $419,522 $343,596 $201,338 Per Capita Material Expenditures $9.96 (1) $6.88 $3.78 $5.85 $5.02 $3.76 $7.28 $4.16 $2.94 Material Exp.as a % of Total Exp. 11.66% (5) 12.28% 11.19% 16.77% 11.24% 10.22% 16.88% 12.79% 8.94% Services Circulation 1,513,052 (2) 1,431,023 708,139 600,372 695,036 1,527,788 666,138 584,104 441,746 Circulation per Capita 22.30 (2) 24.27 5.61 9.65 6.97 7.51 11.56 7.06 6.46 Circulation per Item (Turnover) 6.7 (1) 6.5 6.6 3.1 2.2 2.7 3.3 2.5 2.6 Circulation per FTE 22,742 (4) 32,267 16,058 24,595 10,627 16,094 23,186 16,594 14,469 Annual Building Traffic 746,556 (2) 435,572 367,295 436,136 511,259 1,344,334 286,416 419,635 274,903 Building Traffic per Capita 11.00 (1) 7.39 2.91 7.01 5.13 6.61 4.97 5.08 4.02 A - 31 Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames Cedar Rapids Council Bluffs Davenport Des Moines Dubuque Sioux City Waterloo Reference Transactions 81,298 (4) 52,442 23,429 52,290 107,527 216,448 29,589 118,716 74,781 Reference per Capita 1.20 (1) 0.89 0.19 0.84 1.08 1.06 0.51 1.44 1.09 Children’s Program Attendance 25,802 (3) 38,099 21,215 20,280 14,896 65,787 12,858 11,037 20,255 Technology Total Licensed Databases 46 (3) 36 51 41 58 33 39 37 26 Internet Computers for Public Use 46 (6) 28 54 83 50 126 45 24 64 City Residents per Computer 1,475 (6) 2,106 2,339 750 1,994 1,615 1,281 3,445 1,069 Public Internet Uses 123,636 (2) 66,015 45,044 70,047 97,398 242,791 43,490 72,172 108,430 5. Selected National Library Comparison The charts below present data from selected public libraries. Data was compiled by ICPL using metrics based on the ICMA Center for Performance Measurement report. 2009 reported data are used, the most recent available for some comparison libraries. *Population includes residents for each library’s entire service area, including contracting cities and proportional representations of rural county populations. For instance, the population used for Iowa City includes a portion of rural county residents, Hills, and University Heights. This is important to help standardize data, especially when comparing to regional libraries such as Daniel Boone in the Columbia, Missouri area. Outcomes & Measures Iowa City, Iowa (per Capita rank) Fayetteville, Arkansas Skokie, Illinois Westerville, Ohio Bloomington, Illinois Boulder, Colorado Ann Arbor, Michigan Daniel Boone Regional (Missouri) Population* 78,214 (4) 58,047 63,348 71,431 74,975 100,418 155,611 172,462 Number of Outlets Central Library 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Branch Libraries 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 2 Bookmobiles 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 2 Outlets 0 1 2 1 2 4 5 5 Employees FTE 65.00 44.0 111.0 69.0 58.0 79.0 169.0 120.0 A - 32 Outcomes & Measures Iowa City, Iowa (per Capita rank) Fayetteville, Arkansas Skokie, Illinois Westerville, Ohio Bloomington, Illinois Boulder, Colorado Ann Arbor, Michigan Daniel Boone Regional (Missouri) MLS in FTE 14.90 11.0 31.0 21.0 12.0 16.0 29.0 23.0 FTE per Capita (per 1,000) 1.20 (6) 1.31 5.70 1.03 1.29 1.27 0.92 1.43 Operating Revenue Local Revenue per Capita $58.65 (4) $53.62 $151.70 $26.53 $58.44 $68.12 $95.77 $45.92 Total Revenue per Capita $67.56 (5) $62.90 $165.18 $84.77 $65.73 $69.63 $102.44 $50.10 Total Revenue $5,283,812 $3,429,097 $10,463,820 $6,055,323 $4,927,950 $6,852,765 $15,941,548 $8,640,169 Operating Expenditures Total Collection Expenditures $621,044 $429,252 $1,165,148 $617,302 $513,266 $722,651 $1,903,118 $1,245,481 Collection Expenditures per Capita $7.94 (4) $7.39 $18.39 $8.64 $6.85 $7.20 $12.23 $7.22 Total Operating Expenditures $5,283,812 $3,429,097 $9,144,895 $5,685,764 $4,167,625 $6,852,765 $12,057,936 $7,503,036 Operating Expenditures per Capita $67.56 (5) $59.07 $144.36 $79.60 $55.59 $68.24 $77.49 $43.51 Collections Total Collection 228,904 252,171 629,321 479,626 259,025 404,573 497,964 552,674 Collection per Capita 2.9 (8) 4.3 9.9 6.7 3.5 4.0 3.2 3.2 Serial Subscriptions 522 458 835 432 550 559 1,451 917 Databases 43 101 54 325 43 54 32 41 Services Total Circulation 1,523,810 1,056,178 1,731,452 2,149,919 1,012,109 1,354,742 9,172,180 1,966,123 Circulation per Capita 19.48 (4) 18.20 27.33 30.10 13.50 13.49 58.94 11.40 A - 33 Outcomes & Measures Iowa City, Iowa (per Capita rank) Fayetteville, Arkansas Skokie, Illinois Westerville, Ohio Bloomington, Illinois Boulder, Colorado Ann Arbor, Michigan Daniel Boone Regional (Missouri) Library Visits 745,077 594,387 783,819 1,155,076 335,994 991,599 1,713,595 874,467 Library Visits per Capita 9.53 (6) 10.24 12.37 16.17 4.48 9.87 11.01 5.07 Reference Transactions 85,131 71,267 75,102 163,644 74,424 52,213 59,801 263,395 Number of Public Internet Terminals 46 104 86 202 60 63 241 67 Users of Public Internet Terminals 131,300 101,843 137,698 1,191,944 69,041 193,489 265,749 198,733 6. Metric Comparative Analysis ICMA vs. IUPLA Operating Expenditures per Capita ICMA Summary ICPL has per capita operating expenditures dramatically higher than the ICMA peer group average. Expenditures for ICPL average $85.45 per resident compared to the ICMA average of $32.91. IUPLA Summary ICPL’s per capita operating expenditures are also much higher than the IUPLA average of $44.66. ICPL has the highest per capita expenditures among IUPLA members and is $29.39 more than the next highest IUPLA library (Ames). Registered Borrowers per Capita ICMA Summary ICPL has many more registered borrowers per capita than ICMA peer communities. ICPL has more registered borrowers than Iowa City has residents, with a registered borrower percentage of just over 100%. The ICMA average for communities of 25,000 to 100,000 residents is 65%. IUPLA Summary ICPL also has a very high per capita registered borrower percentage when compared to other Iowa public libraries. The average for IUPLA libraries is 69%. ICPL ranks first in this metric among IUPLA members. Consider: ICPL has a significant number of non-resident borrowers. 71% of the library’s registered borrowers are City residents. This additional activity may have the effect of increasing the per capita cost of the library for City residents, but may also serve as an attraction that brings visitors to the City from outlying areas. Fittingly, ICPL receives the most county financial support among IUPLA members. Consider: While this metric is affected by ICPL’s large number of non- resident borrowers, it is still exceptionally high. This tends to be the case with cities that are home to large universities; ICPL’s per capita expenditures are comparable to libraries in Bloomington (IL), Ann Arbor (MI), and Boulder (CO). However, ICPL expenditures are significantly higher than Ames, also home to a large state university. A - 34 Circulation per Capita ICMA Summary ICPL’s circulation per capita of 22.30 is significantly higher than the ICMA peer group average of 12.30. IUPLA Summary ICPL’s circulation is also much greater than the IUPLA per capita average of 11.27. ICPL ranks second among IUPLA members in this metric behind Ames (24.27). Ames operates a bookmobile that circulates a significant amount of children’s materials to area schools. Collection Expenditures as a Percentage of Total Operational Expenditures ICMA Summary ICPL spends a lower percentage of operational expenditures on material acquisitions (11.66%) than the ICMA peer group average of 14.3%. IUPLA Summary ICPL spends a slightly smaller percentage of its operational budget on material acquisitions than the IUPLA average of 12.44%. Staff per Capita (FTE employees per 1,000 residents) ICMA Summary ICPL staffs 0.98 FTE employees per 1,000 residents, nearly double the ICMA peer group average of 0.53. IUPLA Summary ICPL’s average is also dramatically higher than the IUPLA average of 0.55. Library Visits per Capita (Total building traffic per resident) ICMA Summary ICPL’s per capita library visits of 11.0 are significantly higher than the ICMA peer community average of 7.4. IUPLA Summary ICPL also outpaces the IUPLA per capita visit average of 6.0. ICPL ranks first among IUPLA libraries in this metric. Consider: While increased circulation can necessitate increased operational expenditures, it should be noted that Ames has a higher per capita circulation and much lower per capita expenditures. However, Ames operates a bookmobile that circulates a significant number of children’s materials during visits to area schools. After backing out Ames’ bookmobile service, ICPL would rank first among IUPLA members in this measure. ICPL ranks fourth among IUPLA member libraries in circulation per FTE, but first in circulation per item (turnover). Consider: This metric must be understood in context with other variables. A higher percentage of expenditures devoted to collection acquisitions could demonstrate more efficient operations, with more budgetary flexibility to expand collections. However, it could also demonstrate fewer staff available for patron assistance or program administration. Consider: This metric should also be interpreted in context. High staff counts could demonstrate inefficient processes, but could also be a factor of servicing a higher level of library traffic. Consider: High levels of library visits can necessitate higher staffing levels. However, it should also be noted that while ICPL ranks first among IUPLA libraries in visits per capita and second in circulation per capita (noting the effect of bookmobile services in Ames), its ranking in circulation per FTE is fourth. ICPL’s comparatively low percentage of expenditures on collection acquisitions viewed in light of high patron traffic and circulation data may demonstrate a high quality (demand) in the materials acquired. A - 35 Prepared by: Simon Andrew Email: simon-andrew@iowa-city.org Phone: (319) 356-5014 City Appropriations per Capita City financial support per resident IUPLA Summary ICPL’s per capita City appropriations of $55.08 are much higher than the IUPLA average of $36.18, ranking first among member libraries in this metric. Total Revenue per Capita Total library income per resident Total revenue per capita of over $80 per resident is also dramatically higher than the IUPLA average of $46.00. Again ICPL ranks first in this measure. Endowments and Gifts Total charitable income in dollars ICPL generates more than $100,000 annually in charitable gifts over the IUPLA average. In 2010, ICPL received nearly $227,000 in endowments and gifts compared to the IUPLA average of just over $116,000. Expenditures per Borrower Total operational expenditures per registered borrower IUPLA Summary ICPL expenditures per borrower of $85.41 is significantly higher than the IUPLA average of $65.71; ICPL is the third highest IUPLA member in this metric behind Ames and Davenport. Collection Expenditures per Capita Per capita expenditures on materials acquisition ICPL spends more on materials acquisition per capita than any other IUPLA member library. The ICPL expenditure of $9.96 per capita far exceeds the average of $5.51. Personnel Costs as a Percentage of Total Expenditures Personnel costs , including benefits, as a percentage of total operational costs (not including capital expenditures) ICPL’s personnel costs are 66.0% of operational expenditures, less than the IUPLA average of 69.9%. ICPL has the second lowest percentage among member libraries in this metric. Consider: ICPL expenditures per borrower remain high despite its high number of registered borrowers per capita. While non-resident borrowers do influence per capita expenditures, operational costs are still far above the IUPLA average after non-resident borrowers are accounted for. Consider: While ICPL has a high per capita FTE staff, total personnel costs still comprise a lower than average percentage of the library’s total budget. Consider: Again, university communities spend much more per capita on their public libraries than other cities; Ames spends just $1 less per capita than Iowa City. Both cities spend well above the IUPLA average. Consider: While Iowa City appropriates more per resident to its library than any other IUPLA member community, the ICPL also generates more charitable and county income than any other IUPLA library. Furthermore, ICPL receives the second most in state appropriations and generates the second most in fines/fees, behind Des Moines. Consider: ICPL’s rental revenue from leased space accounts for approximately $2 per capita that is not used for operational expenses. A - 36 City of Iowa City, Iowa Performance Reports 2011 Iowa City Senior Center Performance Snapshot Linda Kopping, Senior Center Coordinator Why We Exist: The mission of the Senior Center is to encourage optimal aging among older adults by offering programs and services that promote wellness, social interaction, community engagement, and intellectual growth. The Center serves the public through intergenerational programming and community outreach. Strategic plan goals 2010-2015: • To provide opportunities and advocacy to empower seniors in order to combat ageism, create a positive image of aging, and a positive image of the Senior Center. • To improve stability and diversity of financing. • To increase cultural diversity among participants. • To promote an environment of inclusion. • To be synonymous with the highest quality programs that promote optimal aging. • To involve the Senior Center in the community and the community in The Center. • To improve accountability and transparency. 1. Top Accomplishments and Challenges this Year Challenged negative images of The Center and aging by producing effective television commercials that helped change the image of The Center and aging. Very effective in spreading information and creating a little “buzz.” Without additional funding or staff, expanded and enriched programming with community partnerships. Memberships increased to 1391. Successfully served the varied interests of older adults from 50 to 100 years of age; total of 123,996 visits in FY11. Conducted outcome based surveys of fitness and performance group participants. Results were overwhelmingly positive and demonstrated self-perceived health-related changes. Maintained quality of cardio room by acquiring 3 state-of-art pieces of exercise equipment for participant use. Identified and coordinated the work of 500 volunteers served The Center/community. Increased participant involvement in the operation of The Center by forming the steering council and working committees. Committees selected new logo, conducted class evaluations, developed promotional brochure, etc. Expanded evening and weekend programming to better serve the community. Participated in community initiatives—advance care planning, visibility action team (LGBT creating an environment of inclusion); major partner in both initiatives. Increased recycling, moving toward a paperless building. Community recycling center for cell phones. Lowered operating costs with new boiler, chiller, and roof. A - 37 2. Major Issues to Address in the Near Future Complete accreditation process through the National Institute of Senior Centers, a subunit of the National Council on Aging. Secure and stabilize funding to support operational expenses. Begin to establish relationships with leaders in various ethnic communities. Conduct and analyze a community survey of people 50+ years of age. Replace malfunctioning emergency panel. We have more participant demand for classes than space in which to accommodate them. How we can satisfy the demand we have created is a challenge for FY12. Establish The Center as a central location for community members to meet with trained volunteers to receive counseling as a part of the Honoring Your Wishes: A Community-Wide Advance Care Planning Initiative. Begin transition to electronic production/transmission of program guide or a weekly news brief. 3. Senior Center Performance Measures The data below were collected by the Iowa City/Johnson County Senior Center. Data are influenced by several factors, most notably the manner in which capital projects are budgeted and the operations of meal service controlled by an outside agency rather than the City. Thus, it is more important to analyze data trends than to focus on any one particular data point. Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Comment Revenue City Appropriations $587,712 $1,077,632* $667,613 $570,277 ↔ *In FY08, $462,750 was appropriated for building improvements to restrooms, boiler, and roof. These are typically financed through loans. City appropriation FY11 estimate is $652,119. Meal service is administered by ElderServices; this use of Center facilities introduces a cost without generating revenue. City Appropriations per Capita $8.80 $15.90 $9.85 $8.40 ↔ City Appropriations per SC Member Residing in Iowa City $751.55 $1241.51 $677.09 $533.97 ↓ City Appropriations per Total Visit $10.46 $14.68 $7.23 $6.10 ↓ Contributions and Donations $93,525 $27,720 $48,394 $20,499 ↔ 2006 donations totaled $13,062. Though there are spikes, the trend is labeled flat. Rental Income $371 $1,084 $1,511 $2,151 ↑ A - 38 Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Comment County Revenue $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 ↔ County revenue will drop to $70,000 in the upcoming FY. City appropriations per City resident member are $145.37 higher than County appropriations per County resident. $15 of this difference is paid for by County members themselves through higher membership fees. County Revenue as a Percent of Total Expenditures 9.2% 6.0% 8.6% 9.8% ↔ County Revenue per Member Residing in Johnson County Outside of Iowa City $355.45 $412.09 $362.32 $388.60 ↔ County Revenue per Total Visit $1.33 $1.02 $0.81 $0.80 ↓ Expenditures Total Expenditures $817,930 $1,251,599 $869,113 $766,080 ↔ FY11 estimate for total expenditures is $870,900; the trend is labeled flat despite peak. Increase from FY10 to FY11 is in services. Some debt was retired in FY11. Total Expenditures per Capita $12.25 $18.47 $12.82 $11.29 ↔ Expenditures per Senior Center Visit $14.56 $17.04 $9.41 $8.20 ↓ Personnel Costs $425,992 $422,044 $442,918 $454,454 ↑ Personnel as Percentage of Expenditures 52.1% 33.7% 51.0% 59.3% ↑ FY08 % decrease was due to the inclusion of capital projects in a single FY budget. Services Senior Center Visits 56,189 73,431 92,324 93,419 ↑ Not unique visitors Meals Served 19,261 19,593 17,934 17,197 ↓ Administered by ElderServices Other Services 4,774 11,124 11,672 9,357 ↔ Leveled off after increase. Total Attendance 80,224 104,148 121,930 119,973 ↑ Up despite decrease in meals. Volunteers 445 453 498 500 ↑ Steady, significant increase. Membership Total Members 1003 1071 1217 1287 ↑ Steady, significant increase. Percent, Age 50-59 9.0% 11.0% 12.3% 11.5% ↔ Members in their 60‟s are the A - 39 Percent, Age 60-69 29.0% 32.0% 34.2% 36.0% ↑ growing membership demographic. This could possibly help inform programming decisions. Percent, Age 70-79 33.0% 31.0% 30.4% 29.9% ↓ Percent, Age 80-89 25.0% 23.0% 20.3% 20.0% ↓ Percent of Members, Iowa City Residents 78% 81% 81% 82% ↑ In FY11, Iowa City membership fell to 79.2% and Johnson County increased to 19.2% Percent Johnson County Residents (Outside Iowa City) 21% 17% 17% 17% ↓ Percent non- Johnson County 1% 2% 2% 1% ↔ 4. Comparative Analysis: Iowa City vs. Madison, Wisconsin The organizational structure and services provided by the Iowa City/Johnson County Senior Center are fairly unique; thus, comparative analysis with similar departments is challenging. A comparison to the Madison Senior Center is provided below. This comparison is used due to organization, program, and budget similarities, despite the difference in community size. There are no ICMA benchmarks for Senior Centers. Prepared by: Simon Andrew Email: simon-andrew@iowa-city.org Phone: (319) 356-5014 Outcomes & Measures Iowa City pop. 67,862 Madison pop. 233,209 Comment City Appropriations $570,277 $445,578 All program costs in Madison are funded through donations and program fees. The City funds operational costs only. Iowa City appropriations per capita are dramatically higher than Madison. City Appropriations per Capita $8.40 $1.91 Personnel Costs as a Percentage of Total Expenditures 59.3% 86.3% As a fixed dollar amount, Iowa City spends slightly more on personnel costs than Madison; most of the difference in percentage is from Iowa City‟s larger total budget. Total Expenditures $766,080 $472,126 More than $140,000 of the difference in expenditures is from purchased services. Expenditures per Visit $8.20 $11.06 Programs at Iowa City‟s Senior Center are much better attended than Madison‟s; expenditures per visit are much lower. Rental Income $2,151 $28,208 Rental income in Madison is higher by a factor of 13. Contribution, Donation, and Foundation Revenue $20,499 $16,794 Iowa City receives more donation revenue than Madison. Iowa City donations were more than $93,000 in FY07. Visits* 93,419 42,696 Iowa City logs far more visits than Madison despite the difference in population and Madison‟s practice of providing free memberships. Madison has 7,568 unique users. *Meals served and „other services‟ not included. Volunteers 500 297 Iowa City engages many more volunteers than Madison despite a far lower population; Iowa City volunteers have increased every year since 2007. A - 40 City of Iowa City, Iowa Performance Reports 2011 Iowa City Transportation Services Performance Snapshot Chris O’Brien, Transit Director Why We Exist: To provide the citizens and visitors of Iowa City safe, convenient, economical and clean transportation alternatives through customer focus and efficient use of resources. This includes moped/scooter, bicycle and vehicular parking as well as public transit 1. Top Accomplishments and Challenges this Year Along with the University of Iowa and City of Coralville, implemented a transit AVL system, Bongo. Provided over 1.8 million transit rides. Took Delivery of six new 40’ heavy duty buses, two more will be delivered. Completed FTA Triennial Review Completed installation of 1100 LED fixtures in parking facilities which was partially funded through grant funds. This has led to a reduction in energy usage in parking facilities by nearly 52%. Installed new pay stations at Chauncey Swan Parking Facility and Court Street Transportation Center Initiated a process for car sharing program. Purchase of additional access control equipment for three parking facilities. Performed expanded role in snow removal in downtown Iowa City and along bus routes . Began design process for new multi-use parking facility south of Burlington Street. Initiated a process for mobile license plate recognition system. In preliminary stages of a study to relocate/replace existing transit facility. Implementation of changes for moped/scooter parking. In the process of modernizing elevators in Capitol Street and Dubuque Street parking facilities. Awarded grant funds to replace existing transit farebox system . Relocated customer service operations to Iowa Avenue location. 60% complete on project to rehabilitate the steel frames of 10 40’ buses. This will extend the life of the vehicles an estimated 7 years. Filled two Operation Supervisor positions. 3. Transit Performance Measures On time performance of our transit system. Routes need to be assessed and adjusted to provide a more reliable system for our users. Automation of parking facilities, 24/7 facility operations. PCI compliance. Booting vehicles vs. impounding vehicles for excess parking tickets. Ongoing parking facility maintenance. Reduction of scheduled overtime. Event parking for major downtown events and University home football weekends. Implementation of new camera security systems at parking and transit locations. Continue to use technology and phone applications to enhance our services, (i.e. transit trip maker system, online payments and permit renewals, make data available to customers showing them open parking spaces, etc.). Evaluate transition from single space to multi space parking meters. New transit facility. Amtrak service. Expansion/reallocation of transit services in Iowa City. Para-transit services – contract expires after FY2013 . Expansion/Modification of parking regulations ( i.e. expand metered areas, add time limit parking, etc.). Federal & State transit funding. Expansion of Customer Service hours. 2. Major Issues to Address in the Near Future A - 41 The data presented below was collected by Iowa City Transit. It is important to note that data are influenced by year-to-year differences in asset sales and capital projects. Thus, it is more important to focus on data trends than any given data point. Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Comment Receipts General Levy Support $2,121,422 $2,167,470 $2,286,555 $2,384,714 ↑ General Levy support consists of income funded by property taxes only. Per Capita General Levy Support $31.76 $31.98 $33.74 $35.14 ↑ Other City Taxes** $44,835 $42,971 $46,297 $45,592 ↑ Federal Intergovernmental Revenue $856,154 1,104,494 $993,132 $904,110 ↔ Other State Grants $439,355 $548,281 $667,137 $591,537 ↔ Local 28E Agreements $29,723 $29,804 $29,804 $32,310 ↑ Transit Fees $904,801 $858,904 $1,133,284 $1,033,944 ↑ Misc. Charge for Services $130 $1,740 $940 $2,179 ↑ Misc. Revenue* $67,964 $100,66 $72,870 $96,226 ↑ Rents $136,406 $155,623 $150,171 $133,975 ↔ Parking Ramp Revenue $369,396 $414,758 $442,776 $766,925 ↑ The jump in 2010 includes two payments made by the university at the Court Street Transit Center. Sale of Assets $5,200 $10,394 $1,200 - ↓ Employee Benefits Levy $731,973 $807,257 $860,335 $980,385 ↑ Interfund Loans $24,586 - - ↓ Misc. Other Operating Transfers - - - $922,367 ↑ Revenues from transit are deposited into a reserve account. This money is used by transit for certain capital expenses. Total Receipts $5,731,946 $6,242,032 $6,634,679 $7,894,264 ↑ *includes printed materials ,miscellaneous merchandise, refuse charges for services. ** includes outstanding taxes. A - 42 Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Comment Expenditures Operational Expenditures $4,832,649 $5,289,383 $5,447,993 $5,758,285 ↑ Operational expenditures consist of personnel, services, and supplies. The largest expenditure is personnel, which continues to rise has remained stable. Personnel Expenditures $3,009,548 $3,228,422 $3,336,630 $3,563,936 ↑ Personnel Exp. as a Percentage of Ops. Exp. 62.27% 61.03% 61.24% 61.89% ↔ Services $1,056,948 $1,144,976 $1,347,302 $1,358,121 ↑ Services as a Percentage of Ops. Exp. 21.87% 21.64% 24.73% 23.58% ↔ Supplies $766,153 $915,985 $764,061 $836,228 ↔ Capital Outlay $29,299 $85,251 $65,468 $295,194 ↑ Other Financial Uses $196,699 $1,656,888 $1,121,218 $1,016,388 ↔ Money used from reserve to fund capital expenses. Total Expenditures $5,058,647 $7,031,522 $6,634,679 $7,069,867 ↑ Activity- Parking Performance Factors Outcomes & Measures FY2007 (pop. 66,775) FY2008 (pop. 67,768) FY2009 (pop. 67,768) FY2010 (pop. 67,862) FY2011 (pop.67,862) Trend Comment Web Citation Payments - - - 54.4% 59.5% ↑ Citations Issued - - - 119,039 109,555 ↓ Citations Appealed - - - 1,374 1,428 ↑ % of Citations Appealed - - - 1.15% 1.30% ↑ # of Parking Meters - - - 1131 1131 ↔ A - 43 # of Faulty Parking Meters (maintenance requests) - - - 679 561 ↓ This includes general maintenance of the meters (i.e. Battery replacement). # On Street Parking Spaces - - - 1,131 1,131 ↔ # of Off-Street Parking Spaces - - - 3,086 3,086 ↔ Total Parking Spaces per 1000 Population - - 62.14 62.14 ↔ Transient Hours Parked - - - 4,203,448 4,215,164 ↑ Transient Hours Parked per Space - - - 996.78 999.56 ↑ Total of utilized hours per space. Transient Hours Parked per Capita - - - 61.94 62.11 ↑ Total number of hours parked per person in Iowa City. Avg Hourly Duration- Access Controlled Facilities - - - 3.77 3.8 ↑ Credit Card Usage-Access Controlled Facilities - - - 31% 42% ↑ Vehicle Impounds - - - 3,535 2,943 ↓ Vehicle Impounds per Parking Space - - - .83 .69 ↓ Activity- Transit Performance Factors Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) FY2011 (pop. 67,862) Trend Comment Ridership 1,676,353 1,867,370 1,986,738 1,885,828 1,854,732 ↔ Rides per Capita 25.10 27.55 29.31 27.78 27.33 ↔ Revenue Vehicle Miles 672,247 692,490 719,403 686,087 709,630 ↔ Revenue Vehicle Hours 53,403 54,214 55,073 52,138 55,543 ↔ Cost Per Ride $2.43 $2.44 $2.32 $2.32 $2.61 ↑ A - 44 Cost per In- Service Vehicle Mile $6.05 $6.57 $6.41 $6.38 $6.83 ↑ Cost per In- Service Vehicle Hour $76.14 $83.98 $83.68 $84.00 $87.28 ↑ Farebox/Espense Ratio 22% 19% 25% 24% 22% ↔ This is the percentage of costs covered by the farebox. Average Fare $.54 $.46 $.57 $.55 $.57 ↔ Operating Deficit Per Trip $1.89 $1.98 $1.75 $1.77 $2.04 ↑ Riders per Revenue Vehicle Mile 2.49 2.7 2.76 2.75 2.61 ↔ Riders per Vehicle Revenue Hour 31.39 34.44 36.07 36.17 33.39 ↔ 4. General Transit Data Discrepancies Performing a comparative analysis between local jurisdictions i s an imperfect process. Data are influenced by differences in definitions, reporting, and collection measures. It must be noted that it is important to focus on the trends in the data between communities rather than any one specific data point. While measures have been taken to universalize and standardize the data, the trend in the data is the most valuable information provided. More specifically, some of the factors that influence the comparability of Transit data are: The ability for communities to collect data and maintain records of data (ex. Some track CY others track FY) The level to which capital expenditures and loan servicing are included in the budget. Differences in the services offered and reported by transit departments (some include airport, university-city partnerships). The amount of federal and state grants secured and how these are accounted for in the transit budget. How services are highlighted in the budget document. Staff worked to universalize the data; however, some communities had very fractured systems. This required staff to execute latitude in combining services and budgets. A - 45 5. Iowa Transit Comparison The data presented below compare performance measures from selected Iowa transit departments in the Iowa Metro-Coalition. Expenditures are FY2010 budget estimates. Operational expenditures consist of personnel, services, and supplies. Communities that were too dissimilar in operations and structure were excluded. North Liberty and Coralville were combined and included in the rankings. Current FY10 data was used in the comparative analysis. Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames* North Liberty Coralville Cedar Rapids* Dubuque* Davenport* Sioux City * AVG Expenditures *Parking and Transit budgeted separately Receipts Activity-Transit Performance Factors 2010 Ridership 1,885,828 (2) 5,447,289 *527,220 1,071,568 389,285 1,189,586 1,202,255 1,864,301 Ridership Per Capita 27.78 (2) 92.38 *17.89 8.48 6.75 11.93 14.54 26.97 Revenue Miles 686,087 (5) 1,189,089 *182,912 949,084 550,493 766,664 822,733 827,358 Revenue Vehicle Hours 52,138 (5) 113,182 *15,513 70,456 45,898 55,355 69,426 67,742 Cost Per Revenue Vehicle Mile $10.30 (3) $6.54 *$11.21 $12.44 $12.52 $8.08 $5.81 $9.28 Cost Per Revenue Vehicle Hour $135.59 (3) $68.79 *$132.21 $167 $150.22 $112 $68.96 $117 Riders per Vehicle Mile 2.49 (2) 4.58 *2.88 1.12 .7 1.55 1.46 1.98 Riders Per Vehicle Hour 31.39 (2) 48.12 *33.98 15.2 8.48 21.4 17.31 23.65 Fare Price-Base $.75 (6) $1.00 *$.75 $1.25 $1.00 $1.00 $1.80 $1.16 Operational Expenditures $5,758,285 (3) $7,785,924 $125,000 - $7,209,800 $3,727,117 $5,412,039 $3,506,829 $5,566,665 Personnel Costs $3,563,936 (3) $5,541,962 $0 $1,034,603 $4,395,716 $1,853,006 $2,856,887 $2,015,328 $3,371,139 Total Expenditures $7,069,867 (3) $7,786,424 $125,000 $1,926,027 $11,809,256 $6,895,160 $6,197,265 $4,788,014 $7,745,335 General Fund Levy $2,384,714 (3) 1,315,294 $58,256 $594,623 $3,984,886 $1,161,393 $3,323,302 - $2,433,917 Federal /State Grants (All) $1,495,647 (4) $2,233,871 - $999,025 $3,003,823 $1,110,950 $985,110 $1,935,134 $1,794,089 Misc. Rev Comment - $3,008,118 (GSB Support) Contracts with Coralville Enterprise fund for parking and transit. Parking is fee based. - - All fee based. Transit combined with purchasing. - *North Liberty contracts with Coralville, their data has been combined. Fare Price includes only one way A - 46 6. Metric Comparative Analysis Operational Expenditures Personnel, Services, and Supplies Iowa Transit Comparison Iowa City ranks third in this comparison group for operational expenditures and is slightly above average amongst peer communities. Personnel Costs Costs only related to Personnel Iowa City ranks third in this comparison group for personnel expenditures and is slightly above average amongst peer communities. Personnel costs have steadily risen since 2007 General Fund Subsidy The amount of transit operations funded by the general fund Iowa Transit Comparison Iowa City ranks third in this comparison group for general fund support and is slightly below average amongst peer communities. General Fund support has steadily risen since 2007 Grants Grant monies received for various operational and capital projects Iowa City ranks fourth in this comparison group for grants and is slightly below average amongst peer communities. Federal and State grants have remained level in Iowa City since 2007. Ridership Amount of riders utilizing the bus system annually Iowa Transit Comparison Iowa City ranks second in ridership amongst the comparison group and is slightly above average amongst peer communities. Consider: Operational costs will vary dramatically based on the number of services provided but also age of the fleet and the scope of transit department in general. Consider: Ames stands out as a community that receives significantly more grant monies. Consider: Though Iowa City ranks third among airports analyzed here in terms of the percentage of operations funded by general fund subsidies, nearly all of Davenport’s operational costs are funded by a special levy. Were this included, Iowa City would fall to fourth in this metric. Consider: The City of Ames will skew all the data due to the sheer count difference. Iowa City ridership has remained relatively level from 2007. A - 47 Ridership Per Capita Number of rides per person in Iowa City Iowa City ranks second in ridership per capita amongst the comparison group and is slightly above average amongst peer communities. Revenue Miles Miles operated by vehicles available for passenger service Iowa City is second to last in revenue miles amongst the comparison group and is significantly below average amongst peer communities. Revenue Hours Hours operated by vehicles available for passenger service Iowa Transit Comparison Iowa City is second to last in revenue hours amongst the comparison group and is significantly below average amongst peer communities. Cost Per Revenue Mile Cost of operating a bus per mile (total expenditures/RM) Iowa City ranks third in cost per revenue mile amongst peer communities and is approximately $1.00 higher per mile than the average. Cost Per Revenue Hour Cost of operating a bus per hour (total expenditures/RH) Iowa City ranks third in cost per revenue hour amongst peer communities and is approximately $18 higher per hour than the average. Riders Per Vehicle Mile Number of riders per mile Iowa Transit Comparison Iowa City ranks second in riders per vehicle mile amongst peer communities and is higher than the average. Consider: When compared to peer communities, Iowa City buses are traveling less distances or are on the road for less time. This could be affected by the size of the jurisdiction and service levels. Consider: Coinciding with revenue miles, Iowa City is last for revenue hours. This would indicate Iowa City is spending less time per hour on the road than peer communities. Consider: Ames is by far the most efficient as providing the most miles at the cheapest price per mile. Iowa City is second to Cedar Rapids which covers approximately 260,000 more revenue miles with almost 800,000 less riders. Consider: By including students, Ames is almost double Iowa City in terms of riders per vehicle mile. However, Iowa City has high ridership numbers per mile than the remaining peer communities. A - 48 Prepared by: Adam Bentley Email: adam-bentley@iowa-city.org Phone: (319) 356-5010 Riders Per Vehicle Hour Cost of operating a bus per hour (total expenditures/RM) Iowa City ranks second in riders per vehicle hour amongst peer communities. Iowa City has roughly eight more people riding the bus per hour than peer communities. Fare Price Cost of a one-way fare In comparison, Iowa City is last in charging for its one-way fare. Consider: By including students, Ames almost doubles the comparison average and has roughly 17 more riders per hour than Iowa City. A - 49 City of Iowa City, Iowa Performance Reports 2011 Iowa City Airport Performance Snapshot Michael Tharp, Airport Operations Specialist Why We Exist: The Iowa City Municipal Airport, through the direction of the Airport Commission, will provide a safe, cost-effective general aviation airport that creates and enriches economic, educational, health care, cultural, and recreational opportunities for the greater Iowa City area. 1. Top Accomplishments and Challenges this Year Maintain effective management structure and strong communication with the City Council and City administration. o Adopted FY11-FY15 Strategic Plan – presented plan to council o Work with administration and council to accelerate payback of previously issued debt o Attend Council meetings and give brief updates of airport activities o Attendance at regular City Staff/CIP meetings Develop and maintain adequate funding mechanisms for airport operations and improvements, and increase revenue generated by airport operations. o Agreement with City Council/City Manager to accelerate payback of airport debts; provides for participation in grant planning for Federal and State grant opportunities o Raised hangars rates by 2.5% for 2011-2012 period o Continue working with Realtor to lease or sell lots in North Commerce Park Increase use of the airport for aviation and other community uses. o Hosted 2011 Air Race Classic start o Hosted SERTOMA Pancake Breakfast Fly-In o Hosted IC Aerohawks winter swap meet o Partnered with Airport Businesses to host Open House Increase the usefulness of the airport for economic development. o Hosted 2011 Air Race Classic start o Hosted SERTOMA Pancake Breakfast Fly-In o Worked with Iowa DOT to help communicate results of Economic Impact Study o Continue to meet with area representatives to communicate Economic Impact and use of the airport Upgrade taxiways, runways and other airport infrastructure. o Work with FAA to secure grant funding for Parallel Taxiway project on Runway 7-25 o Work with Iowa DOT Office of Aviation to secure funding for Hangar L Project o Received grant funding for FY2010 Pavement Rehab program o Work with Public Works department to add parking lot repairs to major city rehab project Enhance appearance, curb appeal, and accessibility of the airport; develop a public viewing area on the airport grounds. o Repair entry road and parking lot to main terminal building. o Viewing area open with covered shelter and picnic tables. Continue work on hangars to rehabilitate as needed. A - 50 2. Major Issues to Address in the Near Future 3. Airport Performance Measures The data presented below was collected by the Iowa City Airport. It is important to note that data are influenced by year-to-year differences in asset sales and capital projects. Thus, it is more important to focus on data trends than any given data point. Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Comment Receipts General Levy Support $159,120 $112,000 $130,000 $120,000 ↓ General Levy support consists of income funded by property taxes only. Per Capita General Levy Support $2.38 $1.65 $1.92 $1.77 ↓ Rents $218,849 $232,207 $244,045 $273,810 ↑ Hangar rentals have been at capacity for the duration of this analysis. Rates are derived by comparisons to other area airports. Rents as a Percentage of Receipts *less asset sales 54.08% 51.61% 45.08% 42.64% ↓ Asset Sales $859,649 $1,610,007 $0 $223,000 ↓ Note: Asset sales have funded capital projects. Total Receipts $1,264,309 $2,059,905 $541,344 $865,096 ↓ Capacity Needs: o T-hangar Waiting list holds 20+ entries o Demand for hangar space for larger business class aircraft, specifically for King Air 200 series, and Citation I-IV series aircraft o Additional Aircraft parking spaces are needed during high traffic times (football weekends) Budget: o Airport Operations budget is supplemented by general fund contributions. Cuts to general fund contributions would impact airport operations o Seek additional funding opportunities and steady income streams Airspace: o Airspace Obstruction Mitigation projects are planned for approach ends of Runway 12 and Runway 30. Maintenance: o Most buildings around airport are from 1960-1970s era. This requires a higher dollar upkeep than modern buildings. Main Terminal built in 1951. Many buildings are coming due for rehabilitation at the same time which impacts budget. Public Outreach: o Seek more events and activities to host at the airport. This draws non-aviation people to the airport and increases awareness of the airport. o Communication of airport economic impact to area officials, elected and non-elected. A - 51 Outcomes & Measures 2007 (pop. 66,775) 2008 (pop. 67,768) 2009 (pop. 67,768) 2010 (pop. 67,862) Trend Comment Expenditures Operational Expenditures $279,879 $385,703 $272,350 $292,557 ↔ Operational expenditures consist of personnel, services, and supplies. One unfilled full time position has accounted for the decline in personnel. Personnel Expenditures $85,894 $101,868 $68,037 $40,164 ↓ Personnel Exp. as a Percentage of Ops. Exp. 30.69% 26.41% 24.98% 13.73% ↓ Services $183,067 $275,069 $196,664 $242,495 ↔ Services includes insurance payments, utilities, building and grounds maintenance, interest expense, etc. Services as a Percentage of Ops. Exp. 65.41% 71.32% 72.21% 82.89% ↑ Total Expenditures $838,880 $2,456,004 $499,019 $679,256 ↓ Includes capital expenditures. Activity Fuel Flowage 189,612.68 170,493.00 136,327.41 165,112.47 ↓ Fuel flowage is used as a proxy for airport activity. Based Aircraft 84 84 84 84 ↔ 84 hanger spaces and 1 based Helicopter. Ops. Dollars per Fuel Gallon (Ops. Exp. per Activity) $1.48 $2.26 $2.00 $1.77 ↔ One full-time staff position went unfilled as activity decreased. 4. General Airport Data Discrepancies Performing a comparative analysis between local jurisdictions i s an imperfect process. Data are influenced by differences in definitions, reporting, and collection measures. Thus, it is important to focus on the trends in the data between communities rather than any one specific data point. While measures have been taken to universalize and standardize the data, the trend in the data is the most valuable information provided. More specifically, some of the factors that influence the comp arability of Airport data are: Differences in services offered at general aviation airports (e.g. types of fuel, maintenance services, instruction and rental services). The level to which capital expenditures and loan servicing are included in the airport ’s budget. The amount of asset sales and the level to which these may be used for capital improvements. A - 52 Differences in airport size, runway length, number of hangars operated, and types of aircraft accommodated. o Three types of general aviation airports are analyzed in section 5: enhanced service, general service, and basic service. The specific criteria for each general aviation airport category are detailed in section 8. o Enhanced service airports have runways 5,000 feet or greater in length with facilities and services that can accommodate a full range of general aviation activity, including most business jets. These airports serve business aviation and are regional transportation centers and economic catalysts. o General service airports have runways 4,000 feet or greater in length with facilities and services customized to support most general aviation activity, including small to mid-size business jets. These airports serve as a community economic asset. o Basic service airports have runways 3,000 feet or greater in length with facilities and services customized to meet local aviation demands. The amount of federal and state grants secured and how these are accounted for in airport budgets. Whether data are collected on a calendar year or fiscal year basis. Controlling authority and management structure of the airport: o For some airports, an airport commission has the authority to control nearly all aspects of airport operations, however, they do not have the authority to levy taxes. Iowa City has an airport commission. o An aviation authority may be created through public referendum and does have the authority to levy taxes. o Some airports are a department of City government and have a full -time airport manager; others operate as a division of another department, such as Public Works. Smaller airports may not use City staff at all by including management responsibilities in their FBO contracts. 5. Iowa General Aviation Airport Comparison The data presented below compare performance measures from selected Iowa General Aviation airports. Expenditures are FY2010 budget estimates. Operational expenditures consist of personnel, services, and supplies. General service airports are listed parenthetically; the sole basic service airport analyzed is in brackets. All other airports included are enhanced service airports. *Estimated economic output is derived from the Iowa Department of Transportation’s Economic Impact of Aviation report, 2009. Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames Ankeny (Boone) Davenport Muscatine (Pella) [Sioux Center] Expenditures Operational Expenditures $292,557 (1) $130,398 $274,659 $86,052 $167,858 $114,295 $66,630 $86,788 Personnel Costs $40,164 (4) $42,6143 $0 unavailable $45,718 $0 $0 $70,704 Total Expenditures $679,256 (1) $130,398 $274,659 $179,848 $233,433 $139,006 $66,630 $86,788 A - 53 Outcomes & Measures Iowa City (rank) Ames Ankeny (Boone) Davenport Muscatine (Pella) [Sioux Center] Activity Based Aircraft 85 (3) 65 103 47 104 32 37 15 Economic Impact Estimated Economic Output* $11,207,300 (3) $7,789,400 $14,780,700 $7,735,400 $20,270,500 $4,671,000 $4,446,700 $5,406,900 Economic Output per Ops Dollar $38.31 (8) $59.74 $53.81 $89.42 $120.76 $40.87 $66.74 $62.30 Revenues General Fund Subsidy $120,000 (1) $40,821 $3,988** $0 unavailable $89,959 $0 $74,936 GF Subsidy as % of Ops. Exp. 41.0% (3) 31.3% 1.5% 0% unavailable 78.7% 0% 86.3% Rental Revenue* $273,810 (1) $122,042 unavailable $67,807*** $116,389 $26,612 $25,300 $33,840 *Rental revenue includes hangar and land leases. **Ankeny has a special airport levy which was budgeted for $270,671 in FY10. ***During FY10, Boone had a one-time $40,000 advance hangar rental payment. FY09 rentals totaled $28,634. 6. Iowa General Aviation Airport Activity Comparison The chart below presents data from Iowa City compared to two Iowa general aviation airports. All three are categorized as enhanced service. Fuel flowage is an accurate proxy for airport activity. Operational expenses include personnel costs, services, and supplies. Services vary by airport, thus data should be analyzed in conjunction with all metrics; trends are more indicative of performance than any one data point. *Data discrepancy: Iowa City fuel flowage data is calculated by calendar year; Davenport and Muscatine are tallied by fiscal year. Annual Activity and Operational Expenditures* Iowa City Davenport Muscatine Comment 2007 Fuel Flowage 189,612.68 340,000 249,000 *Muscatine’s 2007 operational expenses are an estimate; exact data was unavailable. Ops. Dollar per Gallon $1.48 $0.44 $0.53* estimated 2008 Fuel Flowage 170,493.00 360,000 183,200 During 2008, the Iowa City Airport had the lowest activity of these three airports, yet the highest operational expenditures. Ops. Dollar per Gallon $2.26 $0.53 $0.61 A - 54 2009 Fuel Flowage 136,327.41 225,000 106,566 Activity dropped significantly in all three airports in 2009; this is most likely the result of diminished travel and recreation after the national economic downturn. Increased fuel prices likely contributed as well. Ops. Dollar per Gallon $2.00 $0.71 $1.04 2010 Fuel Flowage 165,112.47 280,000 57,841 Ops. Dollar per Gallon $1.77 $0.60 $1.98 7. Metric Comparative Analysis Operational Expenditures Personnel, Services, and Supplies Iowa GA Airport Comparison Iowa City ranks first in this comparison group for operational expenditures. Services are approximately 83% of operational costs. Personnel Costs Costs not included in FBO service Iowa City’s airport ranks fourth in this comparison group in this metric. Personnel costs have diminished significantly over the last three years as one full-time position (Maintenance Worker I) has gone unfilled. General Fund Subsidy The amount of airport operations not funded by business activities. Iowa GA Airport Comparison Iowa City provides the most general fund support for its airport of any city analyzed here. However, Iowa City ranks third in this group for the percentage of operations funded through general fund support. Rental Revenue Revenue generated from hangar and land leases. Iowa City generates the most rental revenue of any airport analyzed here. There is also a waiting list of more than 20 aircraft for hangar spaces. Airport staff has indicated the need for additional hangar space and seasonal aircraft parking. Consider: Operational costs will vary dramatically based on the number of services provided. Not every airport contracts for the same services through their respective FBO’s; Iowa City FBO service expenditures cover snow removal, building, and grounds maintenance. Consider: In many general aviation airports, personnel costs are subsumed in the FBO contract. The Iowa City airport has low personnel costs for an airport its size. The reduction in personnel costs has been the largest factor in declining operational costs over the last three years. Consider: Rental revenue has increased every year since in this analysis. Furthermore, hangar rental rates have increased by 2.5% during the current fiscal year (FY12). Additional aircraft parking spaces would be in the highest demand during University of Iowa home football games. Consider: Though Iowa City ranks third among airports analyzed here in terms of the percentage of operations funded by general fund subsidies, nearly all of Davenport’s operational costs are funded by a special levy. Were this included, Iowa City would fall to fourth in this metric. A - 55 8. General Aviation Airport Category Criteria Enhanced Service: 5,000 foot or greater paved runway Airport Reference Code (ARC) of C-II or greater Full-time staffing during regular weekday and weekend business hours Availability of the following based services: o Aircraft maintenance and repair o Flight training o Rental aircraft o Aircraft charter o Airport or Fixed Base Operator (FBO) staffing 24 hours a day o Availability of jet fuel o Weather observing system located on airport (ASOS or AWOS) General Service: 4,000 foot or greater paved runway Availability of the following based services: o Aircraft maintenance and repair o Flight training o Rental aircraft o Aircraft charter o Staffing during regular business hour Basic Service: 3,000 feet or greater paved runway Availability of aircraft fuel Some availability of airport or FBO personnel or on-call availability 24 hours Prepared by: Simon Andrew Email: simon-andrew@iowa-city.org Phone: (319) 356-5014 Based Aircraft Number of hangar spaces rented Iowa GA Airport Comparison Iowa City has 84 leased hangar spaces plus one based helicopter. There is a waiting list of over twenty aircraft for hangar spaces. Iowa City ranks third in the number of based aircraft among airports analyzed here. Fuel Flowage Proxy for Activity Fuel flowage (activity) dropped significantly during 2009, but 2010 activity increased to nearly 2008 levels. While activity in Muscatine has declined every year since 2007, Davenport and Iowa City saw increases in 2010. Consider: Iowa City has high operational costs for its level of activity when compared to Davenport. However, personnel costs are lower in Iowa City than in Davenport. Consider: A waiting list for hangar spaces that is nearly one-fourth of total current capacity demonstrates Iowa City has the demand for additional units. Funding additional projects would have to be weighed against rehabilitating existing hangars, runway improvements, etc. A - 56 APPENDIX B State Forms Budget Resolutions Transfers Assessed Property Valuations Property Tax Levies FY2012 Revenue Comparisons: General Fund Revenue Other Revenue Sources Utility Franchise Tax Gaming Revenue Local Option Sales Tax Utility Rates Revenue Bond Indebtedness Glossary Index by Department F Y 2 0 1 3 Aug-10 1 Form 635.1 Department of Management Adoption of Budget and Certification of City Taxes 52-483 The City of: County Name: Date Budget Adopted: 03/06/12 (Date) xx/xx/xx below, were approved for all taxable property of this City. There is attached a Long Term Debt Schedule Form 703 for the debt service needs, if any. (319) 356-5041 Telephone Number Signature County Auditor Date Stamp January 1, 2011 Property Valuations With Gas & Electric Without Gas & Electric Last Official Census Regular 2a 2b DEBT SERVICE 3a 3b Ag Land 4a TAXES LEVIED (A)(B) (C) Code Dollar Request with Property Taxes Sec. Limit Purpose Utility Replacement Levied Rate 384.1 8.10000 Regular General levy 5 23,870,310 23,486,337 43 8.10000 (384) Non-Voted Other Permissible Levies 12(8)0.67500 Contract for use of Bridge 6 0 44 0 12(10)0.95000 Opr & Maint publicly owned Transit 7 2,799,604 2,754,570 45 0.95000 12(11)Amt Nec Rent, Ins. Maint of Civic Center 8 0 46 0 12(12)0.13500 Opr & Maint of City owned Civic Center 9 0 47 0 12(13)0.06750 Planning a Sanitary Disposal Project 10 0 48 0 12(14)0.27000 Aviation Authority (under sec.330A.15)11 0 49 0 12(15)Amt Nec Joint city-county building lease 12 0 50 0 12(16)0.06750 Levee Impr. fund in special charter city 13 0 51 0 12(18)Amt Nec Liability, property & self insurance costs 14 922,125 907,298 52 0.31291 12(22)Amt Nec Support of a Local Emerg.Mgmt.Comm.462 0 465 0 (384) Voted Other Permissible Levies 12(1)0.13500 Instrumental/Vocal Music Groups 15 0 53 0 12(2)0.81000 Memorial Building 16 0 54 0 12(3)0.13500 Symphony Orchestra 17 0 55 0 12(4)0.27000 Cultural & Scientific Facilities 18 0 56 0 12(5)As Voted County Bridge 19 0 57 0 12(6)1.35000 Missi or Missouri River Bridge Const.20 0 58 0 12(9)0.03375 Aid to a Transit Company 21 0 59 0 12(17)0.20500 Maintain Institution received by gift/devise 22 0 60 0 12(19)1.00000 City Emergency Medical District 463 0 466 0 12(21)0.27000 Support Public Library 23 795,677 782,878 61 0.27000 28E.22 1.50000 Unified Law Enforcement 24 0 62 0 Total General Fund Regular Levies (5 thru 24)25 28,387,716 27,931,083 384.1 3.00375 Ag Land 26 4,349 4,349 63 3.00375 Total General Fund Tax Levies (25 + 26)27 28,392,065 27,935,432 Do Not Add Special Revenue Levies 384.8 0.27000 Emergency (if general fund at levy limit)28 0 0 64 0 384.6 Amt Nec Police & Fire Retirement 29 2,581,365 2,539,842 0.87594 Amt Nec FICA & IPERS (if general fund at levy limit)30 2,797,663 2,752,660 0.94934 Rules Amt Nec Other Employee Benefits 31 4,030,190 3,965,361 1.36758 Total Employee Benefit Levies (29,30,31)32 9,409,218 9,257,850 65 3.19286 Sub Total Special Revenue Levies (28+32)33 9,409,218 9,257,850 Valuation 386 As Req With Gas & Elec Without Gas & Elec SSMID 1 (A)139,871,680 (B)139,871,680 34 279,743 279,743 66 2.00000 SSMID 2 (A)(B)35 0 67 0 SSMID 3 (A)(B)36 0 68 0 SSMID 4 (A)(B)37 0 69 0 SSMID 5 (A)(B)555 0 565 0 SSMID 6 (A)(B)556 0 566 0 SSMID 7 (A)(B)1177 00 Total SSMID 38 279,743 279,743 Do Not Add Total Special Revenue Levies 39 9,688,961 9,537,593 384.4 Amt Nec Debt Service Levy 76.10(6)40 13,144,952 40 12,934,350 70 4.44287 384.7 0.67500 Capital Projects (Capital Improv. Reserve)41 41 0 71 0 Total Property Taxes (27+39+40+41)42 51,225,978 42 50,407,375 72 17.26864 COUNTY AUDITOR - I certify the budget is in compliance with ALL the following: Budgets that DO NOT meet ALL the criteria below are not statutorily compliant & must be returned to the city for correction. 1) The prescribed Notice of Public Hearing Budget Estimate (Form 631.1) was lawfully published, or posted if applicable, and notarized, filed proof was evidenced. 2) Budget hearing notices were published or posted not less than 10 days, nor more than 20 days, prior to the budget hearing. 3) Adopted property taxes do not exceed published or posted amounts. 4) Adopted expenditures do not exceed published or posted amounts in each of the nine program areas, or in total. 5) The budget file uploaded to the SUBMIT Area matched the paper copy certified by the city to this office. 6) The city is receiving TIF Revenues and has completed the TIF Indebtedness section of the TIF DEBT form in compliance with 384.16(1)( County Auditor ) At a meeting of the City Council, held after the public hearing as required by law, as specified above, the proposed budget was adopted as summarized and attached hereto, and tax levies, as itemized 2,958,664,190 1,447,988 67,8622,946,951,863 2,899,547,813 2,911,260,140 FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING JULY 1, 2012 - ENDING JUNE 30, 2013 Iowa City JOHNSON B - 1 Form 631.1 Department of Management NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BUDGET ESTIMATE FISCAL YEAR BEGINNING JULY 1, 2012 - ENDING JUNE 30, 2013 City of , Iowa The City Council will conduct a public hearing on the proposed Budget at on 03/06/12 at 7:00 p.m.. (Date) xx/xx/xx (hour) The Budget Estimate Summary of proposed receipts and expenditures is shown below. Copies of the the detailed proposed Budget may be obtained or viewed at the offices of the Mayor, City Clerk, and at the Library. The estimated Total tax levy rate per $1000 valuation on regular property . . . . . . . . . . $ 17.26864 The estimated tax levy rate per $1000 valuation on Agricultural land is . . . . . . . . . . . $3.00375 At the public hearing, any resident or taxpayer may present objections to, or arguments in favor of, any part of the proposed budget. (319) 356-5041 phone number City Clerk/Finance Officer's NAME Budget FY Re-estimated FY Actual FY 2013 2012 2011 (a)(b)(c) Revenues & Other Financing Sources Taxes Levied on Property 1 50,407,375 49,594,682 47,825,752 Less: Uncollected Property Taxes-Levy Year 2 000 Net Current Property Taxes 3 50,407,375 49,594,682 47,825,752 Delinquent Property Taxes 4 0 0 7,688 TIF Revenues 5 507,060 846,085 846,061 Other City Taxes 6 11,031,846 10,400,955 10,865,460 Licenses & Permits 7 1,440,389 1,223,447 1,413,665 Use of Money and Property 8 1,535,026 1,264,679 1,505,531 Intergovernmental 9 38,627,081 89,040,109 39,614,750 Charges for Fees & Service 10 41,066,638 40,683,916 40,653,159 Special Assessments 11 000 Miscellaneous 12 3,771,813 5,782,600 7,410,013 Other Financing Sources 13 66,682,753 110,692,668 77,450,865 Total Revenues and Other Sources 14 215,069,981 309,529,141 227,592,944 Expenditures & Other Financing Uses Public Safety 15 21,449,889 21,401,631 18,703,397 Public Works 16 7,718,182 13,994,820 13,434,330 Health and Social Services 17 290,707 0 0 Culture and Recreation 18 12,685,436 12,743,563 11,804,919 Community and Economic Development 19 7,217,647 24,626,370 19,119,500 General Government 20 7,618,655 8,282,244 7,460,374 Debt Service 21 20,226,046 15,225,884 14,053,245 Capital Projects 22 25,723,659 80,282,918 18,654,703 Total Government Activities Expenditures 23 102,930,221 176,557,430 103,230,468 Business Type / Enterprises 24 67,003,751 91,149,983 69,838,459 Total ALL Expenditures 25 169,933,972 267,707,413 173,068,927 Transfers Out 26 54,738,103 97,722,338 46,972,625 Total ALL Expenditures/Transfers Out 27 224,672,075 365,429,751 220,041,552 Excess Revenues & Other Sources Over (Under) Expenditures/Transfers Out 28 -9,602,094 -55,900,610 7,551,392 Continuing Appropriation 29 00 Beginning Fund Balance July 1 30 107,618,639 163,519,249 155,967,857 Ending Fund Balance June 30 31 98,016,545 107,618,639 163,519,249 Iowa City 410 E. Washington St., City Hall Marian K. Karr B - 2 Form 635.2A CITY OF Iowa CityDepartment of Management2013Fiscal YearsTIFSPECIAL SPECIAL DEBT CAPITAL BUDGET RE-ESTIMATEDACTUALGENERAL REVENUES REVENUES SERVICE PROJECTS PERMANENT PROPRIETARY201320122011(A)(B) (C)(D)(E)(F)(G)(H)(I)(J)(K)(L)Revenues & Other Financing SourcesTaxes Levied on Property127,935,432 9,537,593 12,934,350 0 50,407,375 49,594,682 47,825,752Less: Uncollected Property Taxes-Levy Year200000 00 Net Current Property Taxes327,935,432 9,537,593 12,934,350 0 50,407,375 49,594,682 47,825,752Delinquent Property Taxes4000000 7,688TIF Revenues5507,060507,060 846,085 846,061Other City Taxes610,367,283 165,712 223,851 275,000 11,031,846 11,149,084 10,865,460Licenses & Permits71,435,53404,855 1,440,389 1,223,447 1,413,665Use of Money and Property8160,103 60,582 161 162,585 0 266 1,151,329 1,535,026 1,264,679 1,505,531Intergovernmental92,708,202 8,346,16900 5,830,01921,742,691 38,627,081 89,253,297 39,614,750Charges for Fees & Service104,189,542 28,846 0 0 0 36,848,250 41,066,638 40,807,916 40,653,159Special Assessments11000000 00Miscellaneous121,846,916 287,513 38,968 100,000 0 1,498,416 3,771,813 5,889,590 7,410,013 Sub-Total Revenues1348,643,012 18,426,415 507,221 13,359,754 6,205,019266 61,245,541 148,387,228 200,028,780 150,142,079Other Financing Sources: Total Transfers In148,998,222 1,112,945 0 878,147 19,375,247 0 24,373,542 54,738,103 96,551,554 46,972,625 Proceeds of Debt150 800,00000 10,200,0000 11,000,000 17,267,000 29,283,746 Proceeds of Capital Asset Sales1694,650 850,00000000944,650 3,863,330 1,194,494Total Revenues and Other Sources1757,735,884 21,189,360 507,221 14,237,901 35,780,266266 85,619,083 215,069,981 317,710,664 227,592,944Expenditures & Other Financing UsesPublic Safety1821,266,840 183,049 0 0 21,449,889 22,167,577 18,703,397Public Works191,832,264 5,885,918 0 0 7,718,182 14,178,323 13,434,330Health and Social Services20290,707 0 0 0 290,707 0 0Culture and Recreation2112,685,436 0 0 0 12,685,436 12,898,367 11,804,919Community and Economic Development222,001,174 4,930,542 285,931 0 7,217,647 24,882,370 19,119,500General Government237,274,423 344,232 0 0 7,618,655 8,283,931 7,460,374Debt Service 24000 20,226,046020,226,046 28,725,872 14,053,245Capital Projects 2500025,723,659025,723,659 80,670,510 18,654,703Total Government Activities Expenditures2645,350,844 11,343,741 285,931 20,226,046 25,723,6590102,930,221 191,806,950 103,230,468Business Type Proprietray: Enterprise & ISF2767,003,751 67,003,751 91,866,575 69,838,459Total Gov & Bus Type Expenditures2845,350,844 11,343,741 285,931 20,226,046 25,723,6590 67,003,751 169,933,972 283,673,525 173,068,927Total Transfers Out2912,146,893 10,209,056 0 0 10,203,156 0 22,178,998 54,738,103 96,551,554 46,972,625Total ALL Expenditures/Fund Transfers Out3057,497,737 21,552,797 285,931 20,226,046 35,926,8150 89,182,749 224,672,075 380,225,079 220,041,552Excess Revenues & Other Sources Over31(Under) Expenditures/Transfers Out32238,147 -363,437 221,290 -5,988,145 -146,549 266-3,563,666 -9,602,094 -62,514,415 7,551,392 Continuing Appropriation330000Beginning Fund Balance July 13417,045,460 3,187,074 -102,519 9,891,056 7,045,266 120,930 63,817,567 101,004,834 163,519,249 155,967,857Ending Fund Balance June 303517,283,607 2,823,637 118,771 3,902,911 6,898,717 121,196 60,253,901 91,402,740 101,004,834 163,519,249ADOPTED BUDGET SUMMARY YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, B - 3 B - 4 B - 5 B - 6 B - 7 B - 8 B - 9 B - 10 B - 11 B - 12 B - 13 B - 14 B - 15 B - 16 B - 17 B - 18 City of Iowa City Taxable Valuation by Class* FY2009 – FY2013 * Does not include Tax Exempt Properties or Ag Land/Buildings Commercial, Total Industrial , Valuation Description Residential RR & Utilities All Classes Fiscal Year 2013 January 1, 2011 - 100% Assessment 3,285,609,160$ 1,330,498,686 4,616,107,846$ Assessment Limitation (state rollback)50.7518%- (1,654,347,114) Less: Exemptions - - (3,096,542) Less Gas & Electric - - (47,404,050) Taxable Assessed Value for the Debt Service Levy 1,667,396,105 2,911,260,140$ Less: TIF Increment (available for debt only)(1,360,024) (11,712,327) Taxable Assessed Value - Regular Levies 1,666,036,081 2,899,547,813$ Fiscal Year 2012 January 1, 2010 - 100% Assessment 3,183,160,330$ 1,304,979,022 4,488,139,352$ Assessment Limitation (state rollback)48.5299%- (1,638,375,949) Less: Exemptions - - (3,163,216) Less Gas & Electric - - (48,337,968) Taxable Assessed Value for the Debt Service Levy 1,544,784,381 2,798,262,219$ Less: TIF Increment (available for debt only)(25,408,841) Taxable Assessed Value - Regular Levies 2,772,853,378$ Fiscal Year 2011 January 1, 2009 - 100% Assessment 3,123,398,460$ 1,294,522,256 4,417,920,716$ Assessment Limitation (state rollback)46.9094%- (1,658,230,825) Less: Exemptions - - (3,239,146) Less Gas & Electric - - (46,333,208) Taxable Assessed Value for the Debt Service Levy 1,465,167,635 2,710,117,537$ Less: TIF Increment (available for debt only)(25,408,841) Taxable Assessed Value - Regular Levies 2,684,708,696$ Fiscal Year 2010 January 1, 2008 - 100% Assessment 3,089,816,108$ 1,272,250,326 4,362,066,434$ Assessment Limitation (state rollback)45.5893%- (1,681,190,479) Less: Exemptions - - (3,324,338) Less Gas & Electric - - (45,156,750) Taxable Assessed Value for the Debt Service Levy 1,408,625,629 2,632,394,867$ Less: TIF Increment (available for debt only)(117,812,738) Taxable Assessed Value - Regular Levies 2,514,582,129$ Fiscal Year 2009 January 1, 2007 - 100% Assessment 3,011,803,441$ 1,253,640,943 4,265,444,384$ Assessment Limitation (state rollback)44.0803%- (1,696,688,413) Less: Exemptions - - (3,395,642) Less Gas & Electric - - (44,597,261) Taxable Assessed Value for the Debt Service Levy 1,327,611,977 2,520,763,068$ Less: TIF Increment (available for debt only)(111,540,045) Taxable Assessed Value - Regular Levies 2,409,223,023$ B - 19 City of Iowa City Property Tax History – All Direct and Overlapping Governments (per $1,000 assessed valuation) Collection Year Iowa City Community School District Johnson County* Kirkwood Community College State of Iowa City of Iowa City Total Iowa City Percentage of Total Residential Rollback % 2003-04 12.865 6.102 0.679 0.004 17.596 37.247 47.2 51.3874 2004-05 12.875 6.166 0.668 0.004 17.314 37.027 46.8 48.4558 2005-06 13.582 6.391 0.649 0.004 17.729 38.355 46.2 47.9642 2006-07 13.632 6.415 0.872 0.004 17.302 38.226 45.3 45.9960 2007-08 13.852 6.823 0.855 0.004 17.297 38.830 44.5 45.5596 2008-09 14.192 7.803 0.852 0.004 17.717 40.567 43.7 44.0803 2009-10 14.191 7.708 0.840 0.003 17.853 40.596 44.0 45.5893 2010-11 14.690 7.540 0.926 0.003 17.757 40.915 43.4 46.9094 2011-12 14.591 7.320 0.999 0.003 17.842 40.754 43.8 48.5299 2012-13 14.073 7.075 1.079 0.003 17.269 39.499 43.7 50.7518 *Includes Johnson County, the City of Iowa City Assessor, and Agricultural Extension levies. Source: Johnson County Auditor B - 20 FY2012 Tax Rate Comparison (Levy Rate per $1,000 in Valuation) City Tax Rate Rank Waterloo $18.21 1 Council Bluffs $17.85 2 Iowa City $17.27 3 Des Moines $16.92 4 Davenport $16.78 5 Sioux City $16.51 6 Cedar Rapids $15.22 7 Coralville $13.53 8 Dubuque $11.07 9 North Liberty $11.03 10 Ames $10.72 11 B - 21 FY2012 General Fund Comparison Revenue & Other Financing Sources (In millions) City Revenues Transfers-In Debt/Sale of Assets Total Revenue Rank Des Moines $113.53 $29.47 $.156 $143.16 1 Cedar Rapids $ 75.76 $30.34 $.200 $106.30 2 Davenport $ 49.44 $16.96 - $ 66.40 3 Iowa City $ 49.33 $10.09 $.046 $ 59.456 4 Sioux City $ 39.83 $19.45 $.058 $ 59.34 5 Dubuque $ 48.02 $ 8.88 $.041 $ 56.95 6 Council Bluffs $ 39.21 $11.75 - $ 50.96 7 Waterloo $ 38.13 $ 9.27 $.133 $ 47.54 8 Ames $ 22.24 $ 7.34 - $ 29.58 9 Coralville $ 13.17 $ 2.93 $.006 $ 16.10 10 North Liberty $ 6.24 $ 1.41 $.300 $ 7.95 11 B - 22 FY2012 Revenue Comparison Other Revenue Sources: (General Fund Only) NR: Information pending: not available online / awaiting response from city officials 1Cedar Rapids: Tax is on electric utility only City Revenue ($) Rate (%) Iowa City $ 565,000 1.0% N/A Waterloo $ 819,500 NR $1,170,000 Cedar Rapids1 $ 1,600,000 1.0% N/A Council Bluffs $ 1,850,000 2.0% $ 925,000 Dubuque $ 2,595,559 3.0% $ 633,992 Sioux City $ 2,870,000 2.0% $ 640,000 Des Moines $13,502,000 5.0% $1,300,000 Ames N/A N/A N/A Coralville est. $250,000 1.0% N/A Davenport N/A N/A $1,195,000 North Liberty N/A N/A N/A Utility Franchise Tax Gaming Revenue B - 23 FY2012 Revenue Comparison Other Revenue Sources: Local Option Sales Tax City %Rate Total Receipts Sunset Date Purpose Iowa City 1.00% $ 7,800,000 6/30/2014 remediation, repair and protection of flood-impacted public infrastructure Ames 1.00% $ 6,935,154 N/A 60% property tax relief 40% community betterment Cedar Rapids 1.00% $17,000,000 6/30/2014 90% flood 10% property tax relief Council Bluffs 1.00% $ 7,800,000 N/A Streets and sewers Davenport 1.00% $14,622,600 N/A 60% property tax relief 40% capital improvements and equipment Dubuque 1.00% $ 8,515,307 N/A 50% property tax relief 20% City facilities maintenance 30% special assessment relief Sioux City 1.00% $11,100,000 N/A 60% property tax relief 20% infrastructure projects 10% city facilities projects 10% economic development Waterloo 1.00% NR 12/31/2015 NR Coralville 0% N/A Des Moines 0% N/A North Liberty 0% N/A NR: Information pending: not available online / awaiting response from city officials B - 24 FY2012 Utility Rate Comparison (average monthly billing per residential unit) City Water1 Franchise Tax Sewer1 Solid Waste Storm Sewer Total Overall Rank North Liberty $32.77 $1.97 $40.46 $ 9.352 $2.00 $86.55 1 Iowa City $27.34 (3) $1.91 (4) $36.08 (2) $15.50 (4) $2.50 (5) $83.33 2 Davenport $36.20 $2.53 $27.233 $12.902 $1.85 $80.71 3 Sioux City $25.69 $1.92 $34.55 $13.90 $0.83 $76.89 4 Des Moines $22.83 $1.08 $31.03 $13.00 $8.50 $76.44 5 Cedar Rapids $23.50 $1.65 $19.92 $16.72 $4.56 $66.35 6 Coralville $17.80 $1.07 $21.22 $19.002 $2.00 $61.09 7 Dubuque $18.48 $1.29 $23.76 $10.72 $5.60 $59.85 8 Council Bluffs $24.13 $1.20 $17.20 $16.00 $0.00 $58.53 9 Ames $24.52 $1.72 $23.95 $ 0.004 $3.45 $53.64 10 1 Average residential household estimated at 8 ccf per month. 2 Volume based. Average residential household estimate for 65 gallon. 3 Pending Council approval in July 2012. 4 Privatized service. B - 25 Summary of Revenue Bonded Indebtedness Principal Amount Date of Final Interest Outstanding Issued Purpose Issue Maturity Rates 06/30/12 9,110,000$ Refunded Parking Bonds Nov. 2009 2024 3.0 - 5.0 8,190,000$ 24,280,000 Refunded Wastewater Treatment Bonds Oct. 2008 2022 3.0 - 5.0 19,560,000 8,660,000 Refunded Wastewater Treatment Bonds May 2009 2025 3.5 - 5.0 8,110,000 15,080,000 Refunded Wastewater Treatment Bonds Apr. 2010 2020 3.0 - 4.0 12,400,000 8,500,000 Water Bonds Oct. 2002 2012 2.0 - 4.65 5,415,000 7,115,000 Refunded Water Bonds Oct. 2008 2024 3.0 - 4.375 6,070,000 9,750,000 Refunded Water Bonds May 2009 2025 4.0 - 4.5 8,905,000 4,950,000 Refunded Water Bonds June 2012 2022 1.5 - 2.1 4,950,000 Total - Principal Outstanding as of June 30, 2012:73,600,000$ Revenue bonds payable at June 30, 2012 are comprised of the following individual issues: * Water Revenue Bonds, Series 2002 will be called on July 1, 2012, utilizing Water fund balance and proceeds from the Water Revenue Refunding Bonds, Series 2012. B - 26 GLOSSARY Assessed Valuation: The estimated value placed upon real and personal property by the City Assessors as the basis for levying property taxes. Assigned Fund Balance: The portion of the net position of a governmental fund that represents resources set aside by the government for a particular purpose. Bonded Debt: A written promise to pay a specified sum of money at a future date along with periodic interest. Proceeds from bonds are typically used for long-term debt to pay for construction of capital projects. Budget: A financial plan for a specific time period that estimates the expenditures and the means of financing those expenditures which are associated with all services and functions performed by the City. Business Type Activities: One of two classes of activities reported in the government- wide financial statements. Business-type activities are finance in whole or in part by fees charged to external parties for goods or services. These activities are usually reported as enterprise funds. Capital Improvements Program (CIP): A management tool used to assist in the scheduling, planning, and execution of a series of capital improvements over a five- year period. The CIP is updated annually. It sets forth the estimated expenditures by year and specifies the resources estimated to be available to finance the project expenditures. Capital Improvements Projects: The specific projects that make up the Capital Improvements Program. The projects involve construction, purchase, or renovation of city facilities or property. They are generally non-recurring major improvements to the City's physical plant which necessitate long-term financing and are permanent in nature. Capital Outlay: Expenditures for fixed assets, such as equipment, remodeling, minor building improvements, and vehicles, that are funded from the operating budget. Since long-term financing is not necessary and expenditures of this type are of such recurring character, these items are not part of the Capital Improvements Program. Cash Basis: A basis of accounting in which transactions are recognized only when cash is increased or decreased. Or, a basis of accounting in which transactions are recorded when cash is expended or received for goods and services which are sold. Committ ed Fund Balance: Self-imposed limitation imposed at highest level of decision making that requires formal action at the same level to remove. Commodities: Items or supplies needed for routine maintenance and operations. They include cleaning, maintenance and office supplies, repair materials, minor equipment, and tools. Contingency: Funds set aside, but not appropriated or approved for use. These funds could be used for unanticipated expenditure requirements, new programs, or to absorb unexpected revenue losses. B - 27 Contractual Service: Services such as utilities, postage, printing, employee travel, repairs and rentals, which are purchased from private contractors. Debt Service: Payment of principal and interest to holders of the City debt instruments. Deficit: Excess of an entity's liabilities over its assets (a negative fund balance). The term may also be used to describe a situation where expenditures exceed revenues. Department : A major organizational unit in the City comprised of related work activities aimed at accomplishing a major service or regulatory program. Division: An organizational subdivision of a department. Employee Benefits: Contributions made by the City to designated funds to meet commitments or obligations for employee fringe benefits. Included are the City's share of costs for Social Security, Iowa Retirement System, and the other pension, medical, and life insurance plans. Enterprise Fund: Separate financial entity used for government operations that are financed mainly from user fees – see Business-Type Activities. Equity Transfers: Non-recurring or non-routine transfers of equity between funds. Expenditures: The cost of goods received and services rendered. Fiscal Year: A 12-month time period to which the annual operating budget applies. In Iowa, the fiscal year begins July 1 and ends the following June 30. Full-time Equivalent (FTE) Positions: A part-time position converted to the decimal equivalent position based on total hours per year. Full-time positions charged to more than one program are shown as an appropriate fraction in each program. Fund: An independent fiscal and accounting entity with a self-balancing set of accounts recording cash, which are segregated for the purpose of carrying on specific activities or attaining certain objectives. Fund Balance: The cash balance that remains in a fund on a given date after all receipts and expenditures have been recorded. General Fund: The fund supported by taxes, fees, and other revenues that may be used for any lawful purpose. General Obligation Bonds: When the city pledges its full faith and credit to the repayment of the bonds it issues, then those bonds are general obligation (G.O.) bonds. Governmental Activities: Activities generally financed through taxes, intergovernmental revenues, and other nonexchange revenues. These activities are usually reported in governmental funds and internal services funds. Grants: Contributions or gifts of cash or other assets from another governmental entity to be used or expended for a specified purpose, activity or facility. B - 28 Intergovernmental Revenue: A contribution of assets (usually cash) by one governmental unit or other organization to another. Typically, these contributions are made to local governments from the State and Federal governments. Grants are usually made for specified purposes. Internal Service Fund: Funds used to account for the financing of goods or services provided by one department or agency to other departments or agencies of the City, on a cost reimbursement basis. Interfund Loan: Loans between funds. IPERS: Iowa Public Employees’ Retirement System (IPERS). Established by the Iowa Legislature in 1953 to provide a secure defined benefit retirement plan for Iowa’s public employees. IPERS covers all municipal employees, with the exception of sworn police officers and fire fighters. Levy Rate: The property tax rate stated in terms of dollars and cents for every thousand dollars of assessed property value. Market Value: The estimated value of real and personal property based upon the current price at which both buyers and sellers are willing to do business. MFPRSI: The Municipal Fire & Police Retirement System of Iowa (MFPRSI) is a defined benefit public retirement system for public safety staff. The System was created by act of the 1990 Iowa Legislature, with formal operations beginning on January 1, 1992. MFPRSI is administered under the direction of a Board of Trustees, with representatives from the membership, participating cities, citizens of Iowa and the Iowa General Assembly under Iowa Code Chapter 411. Non-Program: Program costs that do not relate to any one department, but represent costs of a general City-wide nature. Nonspendable Fund Balance: Portion of net resources that cannot be spent because of their form or because they must be maintained intact. Operating Transfer: Routine and/or recurring transfers of assets between funds. Ordinance: A formal legislative enactment by the City Council, which implements or amends local law. Any budgetary change which affects total appropriations, levies, use of reserved appropriations, personnel authorizations, or duties and powers of appointed officials requires the adoption of an ordinance. Personnel Services: Services rendered by full-time and part-time employees to support the functions of City departments. Costs include salaries, fringes and other related benefits. Program: A distinct function of city government which provides services to the public or other city departments. Reserves: An account used to earmark a fund balance or a portion of a fund balance for a specific use. A reserve may be established formally by ordinance or resolution or informally by administrative action. B - 29 Restricted Fund Balance: Limitations imposed by creditors, grantors, contributors, laws and regulations of other governments or laws through constitutional provisions or enabling legislation. Revenue: Income derived from taxes, fees, grants and charges. In the broader sense, "revenue" refers to all government income, regardless of source, to fund services. Revenue Bonds: A bond that is payable from a specific source of revenue and to which full faith and credit of the city is not pledged. Services and Charges: A category of expenditures used for the purchase of services provided by individuals, businesses or agencies who are not in the direct employ of the city. Special Assessment: A tax levied against a property owner to offset all or part of the cost of public capital improvements which are deemed to benefit that particular property. Special assessments are commonly used to finance improvement projects such as street construction, sidewalk construction, or installation of sewer lines. Special assessments are levied in addition to regular property taxes. Subsidy: Financial aid given to a governmental unit by another governmental unit. For example, in Iowa City, the General Fund subsidizes the Airport with property tax monies. Tax Incremental Financing District (T.I.F.): A geographical area designated for public end private development. Public improvements are funded by debt which is repaid through segregating the increased property taxes resulting from private development. Tax Levy: The total amount of property taxes imposed by a government. Tort Liability: A tort is a wrong against an individual or property that is neither a crime nor a violation of a contract. The City could be found liable or responsible by a court when a tort occurs on City property, as a result of the actions of a City employee, or the function of a City operated activity. The City levies a special tax to purchase tort liability insurance and to cover the cost of tort damages for which the City is found responsible. Transfers: Financial transactions that occur between City funds. Trust and Agency: Funds used to account for monies held by the City in a trustee, custodial or agent capacity for the City's pension and retirement funds and for other entities such as other governmental units. The budget includes the Johnson County Council of Governments (JCCOG) which is a joint endeavor among city governments within Johnson County and the county government. Unassigned Fund Balance: Residual net resources. Total fund balance in the general fund in excess of nonspendable, restricted, committed and assigned fund balance. B - 30 INDEX BY DIVISION Page Accounting ................................................................................................................................................. 217 Airport ..................................................................................................................................................... 294 Animal Care & Adoption ............................................................................................................................ 111 Broadband Telecommunications .............................................................................................................. 300 Building Inspection .................................................................................................................................... 130 Central Business District (C.B.D.) Maintenance ....................................................................................... 162 Cemetery ................................................................................................................................................... 164 Central Services ........................................................................................................................................ 317 City Attorney .............................................................................................................................................. 205 City Clerk ................................................................................................................................................... 200 City Council ............................................................................................................................................... 195 City Manager ............................................................................................................................................. 197 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) ........................................................................................ 227 Community Development / Non-Grant Activity .......................................................................................... 186 Debt Service Fund ..................................................................................................................................... 257 Deer Control .............................................................................................................................................. 114 Dental Insurance Reserve ........................................................................................................................ 320 Document Services ................................................................................................................................... 223 Economic Development ............................................................................................................................ 191 Employees Benefits ................................................................................................................................... 241 Energy Efficiency & Conservation Grant ................................................................................................... 234 Engineering ............................................................................................................................................... 138 Equipment ................................................................................................................................................. 307 Finance - Administration............................................................................................................................ 212 Fire Department ........................................................................................................................................ 115 Flood Recovery & Mitigation Grants .......................................................................................................... 238 Forestry / Horticulture ................................................................................................................................ 160 Government Buildings ............................................................................................................................... 166 General Rehabilitation & Improvement Program (G.R.I.P.) ...................................................................... 253 H.O.M.E. Program ..................................................................................................................................... 229 Health Insurance Reserve ......................................................................................................................... 319 Housing & Inspection Services - Administration ....................................................................................... 125 Housing Authority ...................................................................................................................................... 303 Housing Inspection .................................................................................................................................... 127 Human Resources .................................................................................................................................... 203 B - 31 Human Rights............................................................................................................................................ 207 Human Services Planning ......................................................................................................................... 188 Information Technology Services .............................................................................................................. 311 Landfill ..................................................................................................................................................... 288 Library ..................................................................................................................................................... 141 Metropolitan Planning Organization of Johnson County (MPOJC) .......................................................... 248 Neighborhood Services ............................................................................................................................. 182 Non-Operational Administration ................................................................................................................ 214 Parking ..................................................................................................................................................... 263 Parks & Recreation - Administration ......................................................................................................... 150 Parks ..................................................................................................................................................... 151 Peninsula Apartments ............................................................................................................................... 255 Planning & Community Development – Administration ............................................................................. 178 Police Department ....................................................................................................................................... 91 Public Art ................................................................................................................................................... 184 Public Works - Administration ................................................................................................................... 136 Purchasing ................................................................................................................................................ 219 Recreation ................................................................................................................................................. 154 Refuse Collection ...................................................................................................................................... 284 Revenue .................................................................................................................................................... 221 Risk Management - Tort Liability ............................................................................................................... 225 Risk Management - Loss Reserves .......................................................................................................... 315 Road Use Tax (RUT) ................................................................................................................................ 231 Senior Center ............................................................................................................................................ 168 Stormwater Management .......................................................................................................................... 297 Tax Increment Financing Districts (TIF) .................................................................................................... 243 Transit ..................................................................................................................................................... 269 UniverCity Neighborhood Partnerships ..................................................................................................... 236 Urban Planning & Historic Preservation .................................................................................................... 180 Wastewater Treatment .............................................................................................................................. 274 Water ..................................................................................................................................................... 280 B - 32 Capital Improvement Program FY2012 – FY2016 June 2012 Project Category FY2012 Amended FY2013 Adopted FY2014 Projected FY2015 Projected FY2016 Projected Total - All Years Streets, Bridges & Traffic Engineering 59,652,741$ 18,361,016$ 12,550,553$ 1,760,731$ 12,628,000$ 104,953,041$ Water / Wastewater / Stormwater 33,519,402 13,063,173 16,251,279 2,421,182 - 65,255,036 Transportation Services 4,269,497 5,500,000 5,500,000 - 20,000,000 35,269,497 Culture & Recreation 7,027,952 4,909,051 1,004,050 2,388,000 550,000 15,879,053 Public Safety 9,925,750 729,000 550,000 734,000 - 11,938,750 Airport 6,349,939 1,659,500 675,000 2,602,900 11,287,339 Landfill 6,287,020 - - - - 6,287,020 Community & Economic Development 2,159,407 400,000 400,000 2,959,407 General Government 1,091,502 1,324,592 258,312 148,428 50,000 2,872,834 Total Projects: $130,283,210 $45,946,332 $37,189,194 $10,055,241 $33,228,000 $256,701,977 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Summary by Category FY2012 - FY2016 Airport 4%Water / Wastewater / Stormwater 25% Community & Economic Development 1% Streets, Bridges & Traffic Engineering 41% Public Safety 5% General Government 1% Culture & Recreation 6% Landfill 3% Transportation Services 14% Capital Improvement Program by Category FY2012-FY2016 C - 1 C - 2 C - 3 C - 4 C - 5 C - 6 C - 7 C - 8 C - 9 C - 10 C - 11 C - 12 C - 13 C - 14 C - 15 C - 16 C - 17 C - 18 C - 19 C - 20 C - 21 C - 22 C - 23 C - 24 C - 25 C - 26 C - 27 C - 28 C - 29 C - 30 C - 31 C - 32 C - 33 C - 34 C - 35 C - 36 C - 37 C - 38 C - 39 C - 40 C - 41 C - 42 C - 43 ED: Economic and Community Development DT: Downtown and Near Downtown Development OE: Organizational Effectiveness NS: Neighborhood Stabilization SF: Strong Financial Foundation CC: Coordinated Communication City of Iowa City Strategic Plan June 2012 Status Report Capital Improvement Program (CIP) - Significant Projects Status Report Project Description Strat- egic Plan* Current Status Public Facilities South Wastewater Plant Capacity Expansion This project will expand the South Wastewater Plant to accept the flow from the North Wastewater Plan, allowing the decommissioning and demolition of the flood prone North Plant ED, DT The project has been awarded to J.J. Henderson. Construction is underway. Animal Shelter This project will reconstruct the Animal Shelter destroyed in the Flood of 2008 at a new location on Napoleon Lane. OE, SF Phase one of the design, programming and schematic design, based on the participation of neighboring communities and also the fundraising prospects of the Friends of the Animal Shelter Foundation. Council approved size of the facility. Riverfront Crossings Parking Facility The project will construct a 575 space City parking facility, with an adjacent mixed us private tower DT Proposals due 2/17 Airport Parallel Taxiway This project will construct a full-length taxiway parallel to Runway 7/25. ED Construction Phase 1 of the project is currently 60% complete. Phase 2 will bid late Spring 2012 and construction will follow pending FAA funding. Eastside Recycling Center This project provides a full range of recycling opportunities on the east side of Iowa City and includes an education center as well as space for our non-profit partners assisting with waste diversion. ED Grand opening was held on Earth Day. Punch list items still need to be addressed. Landfill Gas to Energy Iowa City is partnering with the University of Iowa to use landfill gas to help power the Oakdale Campus. ED, SF The University is evaluating proposals from private partners to condition, compress and transport the C - 44 ED: Economic and Community Development DT: Downtown and Near Downtown Development OE: Organizational Effectiveness NS: Neighborhood Stabilization SF: Strong Financial Foundation CC: Coordinated Communication Project Description Strat- egic Plan* Current Status gas. Public Facility Space Needs Analysis Developing an inventory of City owned buildings and determining the status of each building based on various metrics. Estimate major maintenance and additional space requirements for City operations. OE Reviewing draft 2 which was distributed to staff May 2012. Report will be finalized in June 2012. North Wastewater Plant This project will remove most structures and prepare the site to become parkland and open space integrated in the Riverfront Crossings District. Removal of the wastewater plant and transforming the land into a resilient riverfront park will be a catalyst for sustainable redevelopment in this central city neighborhood. ED, DT Preliminary demolition estimates have been prepared and Staff is seeking funding. Flood Recovery Flood Buy-Out Program Purchasing property in the flood hazard zone. In the process of purchasing property as it becomes available. West Side Levee This project includes the construction of an earthen levee, riverbank stabilization, and interior storm water drainage improvements. The levee will extend approximately 3,000 linear feet along the western bank of the Iowa River from the CRANDIC Railroad Bridge to McCollister Boulevard. Storm water improvements will include the construction of new storm sewer and storm water pumping stations and backflow prevention valves. The Environmental Assessment has been completed and approved by CDBG. The funding has been released and the City can start drawing down on the CDBG grant. Property acquisition is scheduled to begin in late spring of 2012. Construction is scheduled to begin in late summer of 2012. East Side Levee This project includes the construction of a levee system and related interior storm water drainage improvements. The proposed levee will extend approximately 4,200 linear feet along the eastern bank of the Iowa River from U.S. Highway 6 to the CRANDIC Railroad Bridge. Storm water improvements will NS, ED MMS Consultants, Inc. from Iowa City held the first public meeting for the East Side Levee Project on January 19th 2012. Survey work is nearing completion. MMS is currently analyzing the existing storm sewer system and starting C - 45 ED: Economic and Community Development DT: Downtown and Near Downtown Development OE: Organizational Effectiveness NS: Neighborhood Stabilization SF: Strong Financial Foundation CC: Coordinated Communication Project Description Strat- egic Plan* Current Status include storm water pumping stations and backflow prevention valves. the work on the preliminary design. The environmental review process will begin in spring of 2012. Taft Speedway Levee This study will identify and evaluate the feasibility of various flood mitigation alternatives for the Taft Speedway / Idyllwild area in Iowa City. The study will determine the impacts each alternative will have on the surrounding area and all those affected. Upon completion of the study, a final report detailing the findings will be drafted and issued to City Council. This report will provide the Council with the necessary information to make a decision on how to proceed. NS The consultant has completed the alternative analysis and analyzed the screened alternatives in greater detail. Soils testing and additional hydraulic modeling hs been completed. There will be an open house on May 31, 2012 and a formal public meeting on June 6 to present the findings of the study. The final report, which will include the public comments, will be completed in June of 2012. Gateway Project This project will elevate Dubuque Street and reconstruct Park Road Bridge to reduce closures due to localized flash floods and Iowa River flood events; minimize backwater flood impacts created by the existing bridge; better serve transit, pedestrians and bicyclists; and rehabilitate existing infrastructure deficiencies within the corridor. ED, NS 16 months into an 18 month long National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Review Process. Final Design & Engineering to begin in September, 2012. Construction planned for Spring 2014-Fall 2015 Rocky Shore Flood Gate/Lift Station This project will Install a flood gate and permanent stormwater pumps to mitigate future flooding of the Highway 6 corridor. ED The design is 60% complete Iowa River Power Dam Repairs This project will repair damage to the downstream face of the dam from the Flood of 2008. The preliminary concept and FEMA project worksheet have been approved. The final design and construction is scheduled for 2012. A preliminary study will be performed to review C - 46 ED: Economic and Community Development DT: Downtown and Near Downtown Development OE: Organizational Effectiveness NS: Neighborhood Stabilization SF: Strong Financial Foundation CC: Coordinated Communication Project Description Strat- egic Plan* Current Status alternative repair options. Watermain Crossing Repair This project will install new watermains under the Iowa River at the Old Water Plant site and south of Highway 6. Project has been awarded to Vieth Construction. Construction will begin in June 2012. Public Infrastructure Central Business District Maintenance This project will repair or replace various streetscape features in the Central Business District. This will include such items as light pole painting, tree grate replacement, Washington Street Two- way conversion, Pedestrian Mall electrical upgrade, sidewalk and brick repair. DT The Washington Street Two- way conversion is complete. The City in conjunction with the SSMID will hire a consultant to review the current streetscape plan and recommend changes First Avenue Railroad Grade Separation This project will provide grade separation between the Iowa Intestate Railroad and 1st Avenue to eliminate traffic delays due to trains and increase pedestrian/ student safety. ED,NS Final design is near completion. Property acquisition is currently underway. Construction to begin in 2013. Dubuque Street Pedestrian Bridge This project will construct a pedestrian bridge over Interstate 80 at the Dubuque Street interchange. This will include the extension of the multi-use path along Dubuque from Foster Road to Butler Bridge. Preliminary concept has been developed. Consultant will be hired in 2012. Planned for construction in 2014. Lower Muscatine Road Reconstruction This project will reconstruct Lower Muscatine Road form Kirkwood Avenue to 1st Avenue. This will include a new traffic signal at the Sycamore Street intersection. ED, NS The project was bid in April and all bids were rejected due to coming in well above the estimate. The project will be rebid in September. Highway 1 Trail This project will construct a 10-foot wide trail along the north side of Highway 1 form Orchard Street to Sunset Street. This will include 4-foot sidewalks along Miller Avenue and Hudson Avenue. NS Shive-Hattery is designing the project. Construction is planned for Fall 2012. Library Remodel Recommendations of a facilities consultant will be implemented over two years. Project includes internal building improvements including new service desks, increased self-check options, creating a new teen area and upgrading worn furnishings. OE Architects have been hired and are developing plans. Plans will be approved by the Board on May 29th. Work on Phase I is expected to begin in September 2012. Work on Phase 2 is expected C - 47 ED: Economic and Community Development DT: Downtown and Near Downtown Development OE: Organizational Effectiveness NS: Neighborhood Stabilization SF: Strong Financial Foundation CC: Coordinated Communication Project Description Strat- egic Plan* Current Status to begin in September 2013. Snyder Creek Trunk Sewer This project will construct a sanitary sewer trunk line to service the Iowa City Industrial Park and areas east of Taft Avenue. ED Currently under construction and should be complete in 2012. Park Road 3rd Lane This project will reconstruct Park Road from Riverside Drive to approximately the new bridge approach section. ED, NS The design is being done as part of the Gateway Project and will be constructed with that project. Sycamore Street Improvement This project will reconstruct the left turn lanes on Highway 6 and add a left turn lane on the north leg of the intersection. This will include reconstructing the retaining wall at Sycamore Mall. ED, NS This project was delayed to allow for the Lower Muscatine Project to be completed. The project is under review to see if it can be bid and completed in 2012. American Legion / Scott Blvd Improvement This project will add turn lanes and a traffic signal system at this intersection. NS, ED The project is currently being designed in house. Construction is planned for 2012. US 6 East Rehabilitation This project will be an asphalt overlay of Highway 6 from the Riverside Drive to Lakeside Drive. This will include paved shoulders. This is a joint project with the Iowa DOT. ED, NS The project is in the concept stage. The project will be designed by the DOT and is planned for construction in 2013. Burlington/Madi son Intersection This project will install a median in Burlington Street from Madison Street to the Iowa River. This will also include pedestrian crossing improvements. This is a joint project with the University of Iowa and Iowa DOT. DT Staff is currently pursuing additional funding opportunities. Plans will be completed in 2012 and construction in 2013. Burlington/Clint on Intersection This project will install left turn lanes on Clinton Street. This is a joint project with the University of Iowa. This project will not include medians on Burlington Street. DT This project is in concept stage. Normandy Drive Restoration This project will develop the properties purchased through the Flood Buyout Program into parkland. Concept has been developed based on expected buyout properties. Consultant will be hired to finalize the plans after property buyouts are completed. Construction is planned for 2013. C - 48 ED: Economic and Community Development DT: Downtown and Near Downtown Development OE: Organizational Effectiveness NS: Neighborhood Stabilization SF: Strong Financial Foundation CC: Coordinated Communication Project Description Strat- egic Plan* Current Status Parkland Development Terry Trueblood Recreation Area Iowa Cities largest Park, developed in three phases. Third phase is currently under construction which includes a park lodge, playground, and park shelters. The project has been awarded. Construction is underway. Court Hill Trail - Phase 3 This project will construct a 10-foot wide trail from Scott Boulevard to an existing trail near Arlington Drive through Scott Park. This will include connections to the Dog Park, a trail north of Court Street and an 8-foot neighborhood sidewalk. NS The project has been awarded. Construction will begin in July. Lower City Park Secondary Access This project will develop an access from Normandy Drive to Lower City Park access road. This is for secondary access for better traffic flow and emergency access. This will also provide additional access during the Gateway Project. Concept has been developed. Consultant will be hired in 2012 to finalize design. Construction planned for 2012. Other / General Government Utility Billing and ERP Software This project will update computer software systems to enhance overall services, enhance communications between departments, and provide a new software mainframe for the many of the City computer systems. CC Staff is currently reviewing possible vendors. Projectdox Software CC Staff is currently reviewing a vendor contract. Software is expected to go live August/September 2012 GIS Software This project will update the GIS needs assessment conducted in 2001. This assessment will be used to determine the system architecture need for the GIS system. The project will research opportunities to partner with other governmental organizations. CC, ED Develop an RFP for consultant services. C - 49 Project Type Primary Funding Source FY12 FY13 FY14 FY15 FY16 Bike / Pedestrian Trails GO Debt 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 50,000 Brick Street Repair Road Use Tax 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 20,000 Bridge Maintenance Road Use Tax 140,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 60,000 Cemetery Resurfacing GO Debt 100,000 - 50,000 - 50,000 City Hall - Other Projects GO Debt 328,898 116,400 50,000 50,000 50,000 Curb Ramps GO Debt 50,000 50,000 - 50,000 - Overwidth Paving / Sidewalks Road Use Tax 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 Parks Maintenance/Improv. GO Debt 409,078 200,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 Pavement Rehab RUT&Franchise Tax 1,067,695 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 Railroad Crossings Road Use Tax 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 25,000 Sewer Main Replacement Sewer User Fees 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 500,000 Sidewalk Infill GO Debt 185,117 100,000 100,000 100,000 100,000 Street Pavement Marking Road Use Tax 185,000 185,000 185,000 185,000 185,000 Traffic Calming Road Use Tax 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 Traffic Signal GO Debt 421,000 200,000 120,000 120,000 120,000 Underground Electrical * Franchise Tax - - 50,000 175,000 - Water Main Replacement Water User Fees 600,000 600,000 600,000 600,000 600,000 4,141,788 2,666,400 2,570,000 2,695,000 2,520,000 Total - Recurring Projects: City of Iowa City Capital Improvement Program FY2012 - 2016 Recurring Projects The following allocations have been made for annual improvement and maintenance of municipal infrastructure, including public streets, bridges, traffic control and park facilities. C - 50 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Unfunded Projects Project Name Description Unfunded Amt As of 12/14/11 1 - Bridges 1 BURLINGTON ST BRIDGE- SOUTH The south bridge is having a problem with delaminating concrete on the bottom side of the arches. $1,200,000 2 F STREET BRIDGE This project involves the removal and replacement of the existing corrugated metal arch bridge with a larger bridge. $750,000 3 FOURTH AVENUE BRIDGE This project will replace the bridge over the South Branch of Ralston Creek at Fourth Avenue and will include sidewalks. Possibility of approximately $75,000 state funding. $750,000 4 PRENTISS ST. BRIDGE This project involves the removal and replacement of the existing triple corrugated metal pipe culvert with a bridge. $900,000 5 SECOND AVENUE BRIDGE This project will replace the bridge over Ralston Creek at Second Avenue and will include sidewalks. $750,000 6 SIXTH AVENUE BRIDGE This project involves the removal and replacement of the existing twin box culvert with a larger bridge. $750,000 7 THIRD AVENUE BRIDGE This project will replace the bridge over the South Branch of Ralston Creek at Third Avenue. $750,000 2 - Streets 8 BENTON STREET - ORCHARD TO OAKNOLL This is a capacity related improvement identified by the Arterial Street Plan. $5,000,000 9 DODGE ST - GOVERNOR TO BOWERY Street reconstruction and storm sewer improvements.$10,400,000 10 DUBUQUE RD PAVING - BRISTOL TO DODGE Reconstruct and upgrade to urban cross sections.$1,300,000 11 EMERALD STREET DIAMOND GRINDING This project will diamond grind all of Emerald Street to remove the slab warping that interferes with the use of this street by fire trucks. $206,000 12 FOSTER RD- DUBUQUE TO PRAIRIE DU CHIEN This project will pave this portion of Foster Road and extend the sanitary sewer. $2,400,000 13 GILBERT / US 6 INTERSECTION LEFT TURN LANES Reconstruct the intersection of Gilbert & US 6 to include dual left turn lanes on Gilbert St. $4,699,000 14 GILBERT ST IAIS UNDERPASS This project relocates the sidewalks of the Gilbert St. underpass at the IAIS Railroad. The sidewalks are moved further from the street and existing erosion problems are addressed. $317,000 C - 51 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Unfunded Projects 15 OLD HWY 218 STREETSCAPE Streetscape improvements on Old Hwy 218 entrance - Sturgis Ferry Park to US Hwy 6. This project includes landscaping, lighting and sidewalk improvements. The project should be coordinated with Sturgis Ferry Park upgrade and /or Riverside Drive Redevelopment project. $788,000 16 HIGHWAY 965 EXTENSION This project will be initial phase of constructing Hwy 965 extended from the south side of Hwy 218 to Melrose Avenue to arterial standards. $8,900,000 17 LAURA DRIVE RECONSTRUCTION This project would reconstruct Laura Drive between Foster Rd. and Forest View Trailer Court. $1,200,000 18 MCCOLLISTER - GILBERT ST TO SCOTT BLVD Extend proposed McCollister Boulevard from Gilbert Street to Scott Boulevard. $12,100,000 19 MORMOM TREK - LEFT TURN LANES Construct left turn lanes at major intersections or a continuous center lane through the corridor between Melrose and Abbey Lane. Federal STP funds are proposed for this project. $3,863,000 20 MELROSE-WEST-218/CITY LIMITS Reconstruct and improve street to urban design standards. $3,800,000 21 MYRTLE/ RIVERSIDE INTERSECTION Signalization of intersection based on warrants. The project will also include paving improvements. $874,000 22 NORTH GILBERT ST PAVING This project will reconstruct the 900 block of North Gilbert Street to improve the pavement form a chip seal to concrete pavement with curbs, gutters, and sidewalks. $721,000 23 OAKDALE BLVD This project would construct an extension north across I-80 to a new intersection with Iowa Hwy 1. $10,600,000 24 OAKDALE BLVD-HWY 1 TO PRAIRIE DU CHIEN RD This project would construct Oakdale Blvd from Hwy 1, west to Prairie Du Chien Road. $8,000,000 25 PENINSULA SECONDARY ACCESS ROAD This project will establish a more reliable access to the Peninsula neighborhood by either elevating Foster Rd from Laura Dr to No Name road by creating a secondary access to the area. This project will not be necessary if the Taft Speedway Levee Project is constructed. $3,090,000 26 RIVERSIDE DRIVE STREETSCAPE Streetscape improvements on Riverside Drive between Myrtle Avenue and US Hwy 6. Project includes consolidation of driveways, undergrounding of utilities, installing sidewalks and landscaping. $2,252,000 27 ROHRET RD IMPROVEMENTS- LAKESHORE TO LIMITS Project will reconstruct Rohret Rd to urban standards.$1,760,000 28 S GILBERT ST IMPROVEMENTS Reconstruction from Benton Street to Stevens Drive. This project does not include improvements to the Gilbert St. / Highway 6 intersection. $4,200,000 C - 52 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Unfunded Projects 29 SOUTH ARTERIAL AND BRIDGE, US218 TO GILBERT STREET Construction of a south arterial street and bridge over the Iowa River, connecting from Old Hwy 218/US 218 interchange on the west side of the Iowa River to Gilbert Street/Sycamore 'L' intersection . $15,521,000 30 SYCAMORE-CITY LIMITS TO 'L' Reconstruct Sycamore to arterial standards from City limits to the Sycamore L. Storm sewer, sidewalk improvements and bike lanes are included. $2,400,000 31 SYCAMORE-HWY 6 TO DEFOREST This project involves additional lanes to improve capacity. $1,200,000 32 TAFT AVENUE Herbert Hoover Hwy to 420th Street.$16,892,000 3 - Transportation Services 33 ROCK ISLAND RAILROAD DEPOT RESTORATION Preparation of Old Rock Island Railroad Depot for Amtrak service, including platform construction, lighting, utilities, passenger informations display, ticketing kiosks, canopy, warming shelter, signage, parking, and accessibility improvements. $5,224,000 34 U SMASH 'EM DEMOLITION Demolition of the U-Smash'm bulding; securing adjacent foundations; and restoration of the area to grass. This does not include demolition of the Wilson's building. (A water pipe will need to be relocated before demolition can occur.) $214,000 4 - Ped & Bike Trails 35 CITY PARK TRAIL IMPROVEMENTS This project calls for the replacement of the old section of trail in the southeast portion of the park and relocating it closer to the river. Another part of the project is to expand the trail system by constructing a new section of trail near the bottom of the wooded hill south of the Boys' Baseball fields. $310,000 36 CITY PARK TRAIL LIGHTING Install pedestrian lighting on the trail system in City Park.$247,000 37 HWY 1 SIDEWALK / TRAIL Construct a 10 foot wide sidewalk along IA Hwy 1 between Sunset Street and Mormon Trek Boulevard. $658,000 38 HWY 6 TRAIL - BROADWAY/SYCAMORE Extend existing trail along Hwy 6 between Broadway to Sycamore Street. $2,513,000 39 HWY 6 TRAIL - SYCAMORE TO LAKESIDE Extend existing trail along Hwy 6 between Sycamore Street and Lakeside Drive. $1,801,000 C - 53 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Unfunded Projects 40 IA RIVER TRAIL - BENTON ST/HWY 6 Relocate a portion of Iowa River Corridor Trail between Benton Street and Clinton Street , approximately 1,500 feet. Project would relocate this portion of the trail from a high truck traffic location in front of City Carton , to along the river in back of City Carton. $125,000 41 IA RIVER TRAIL- BENTON/STURGIS Continue the River Trail project from Benton St., along the west bank, through Sturgis Ferry Park, and construct a pedestrian/bicycle bridge over the Iowa River to connect with the existing trail on the east bank, near Napoleon Park. $2,252,000 42 IRC-ELKS PROPERTY Construction of a trail along the Iowa River Corridor (IRC) on the south side of the Elks property. $900,000 43 LINN ST PED IMPROVEMENTS Installation of pedestrian and streetscape improvements in walkway next to Van Allen Hall between Iowa Avenue and Jefferson Street. $381,000 44 N DISTRICT NATURE TRAIL Construct a trail along Williams pipeline easement from Bristol Drive to Dubuque Street. $338,000 45 RIVERSIDE DRIVE PED TUNNEL Construction of a pedestrian tunnel through the railroad embankment to provide a pedestrian route on the west side of Riverside Drive south of Myrtle Avenue. $900,000 46 SAND LAKE TRAIL (Behind Hills Bank) Develop a walking/biking trail around Sand Lake (behind Hills Bank) to tie in with existing Iowa River Trail and the Highway 6 Trail. $450,000 47 SHIMEK SCHOOL / FOSTR RD EXT TRAIL Construct a trail north of Shimek School to future Foster Road. $78,000 48 SIDEWALK-OLD 218 Construct a 10 foot wide sidewalk along S. Riverside Drive (Old 218) between US Hwy 6 and the future extension of Mormon Trek Boulevard. $676,000 49 WILLOW CREEK TRAIL - PHASE III Construct a trail from Willow Creek Drive, under Highway One, around perimeter of airport, to connect with Iowa River Corridor (IRC) Trail. $845,000 50 WILLOW CREEK TRAIL- WEST Connect Willow Creek Trail from its current west terminus via a tunnel under Highway 218, to connect with the trail in Hunters Run Park and further west. $2,732,000 5 - Wastewater 51 NORTH BRANCH DAM TRUNK SEWER This project extends easterly along Ralston Creek from the North Branch Dam to Scott Boulevard. $3,748,000 52 NORTHEAST TRUNK SEWER Reconstruction of an under-sized sewer through the northeast neighborhoods. $5,069,000 C - 54 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Unfunded Projects 53 NORTH WASTEWATER PLANT DECOMMISSIONING Demolish and remove the NWWTP facility and prepare site for parkland or redevelopment. This project will preserve the Admin and Filter buildings and prepare them for repurposing. All other structures will be removed to 2 feet below grade. $5,800,000 54 ROHRET SOUTH SEWER This project would extend the 30" sanitary sewer along Abbey Lane from Burry Drive to the west side of Highway 218. This project will allow development within the watershed of Highway 218. $1,126,000 55 SCOTT BLVD TRUNK SEWER - IAIS/WINDSOR RIDGE This project will extend the Scott Boulevard Trunk Sewer from the north side of the Iowa Interstate Railroad at the Scott Six Industrial Park to the lift station currently serving the Windsor Ridge Subdivision. $1,350,000 6 - Water 56 TAFT/COURT GROUND STORAGE RESERVOIR Construction of a one million gallon buried potable water storage reservoir including pumping facilities. Land acquisition is complete. $1,500,000 7 - Stormwater 57 CARSON LAKE REGIONAL STORMWATR Construction of a regional storm water management facility on the middle branch of Willow Creek immediately west of Highway 218. This facility will serve development west of Highway 218 and south of Rohret Road. Rohret South Sewer project is a prerequisite. $1,126,000 58 IOWA AVENUE CULVERT REPAIRS This project will repair a box culvert that carries Ralston Creek under Iowa Avenue. $338,000 59 N BRANCH BASIN EXCAVATION Aerial mapping done for the update to the flood plain maps revealed that sedimentation has consumed a portion of the capacity of the facility. This basin is located in Hickory Hill Park. $131,000 60 OLYMPIC COURT STORMWATER Stormsewer retrofit to relieve localized flooding from stormwater runoff. $450,000 61 SUNSET ST STORM SEWER The area just north and south of Kineton Green, east of Sunset, has experienced back yard flooding and drainage problems. $427,000 8 - Parks & Recreation 62 OUTDOOR ICE RINK / SKATE PARK Construct outdoor ice rink suitable for figure skating or hockey. During warm weather rink could be used as skate park. $1,545,000 63 PARK SHELTER IMPROVEMENTS Replace Creekside and Happy Hollow Shelter/Restroom buildings. $180,000 C - 55 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Unfunded Projects 64 PENINSULA PARK ENTRY SIDEWALK Construct a sidewalk adjacent to the entry road in to Peninsula Park to reduce safety concerns with pedestrians utilizing the same narrow road utilized by motor vehicles. $106,000 65 REC CENTER EXPANSION Expand the Robert A. Lee Community Recreation Center; likely expansion would be to the east over the existing parking lot which would allow for an expanded gymnasium as well as additional space for racquetball, arts and crafts, community meetings and other activities. $5,628,000 66 RECREATION / AQUATIC CENTER As recommended in the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, construct a major new Recreation & Aquatic Center, probably in the western part of Iowa City. $1,910,000 67 REDEVELOP CREEKSIDE PARK Renovate Creekside Park as recommended in the Parks & Receation Master Plan. $318,000 68 SAND PRAIRIE ENHANCEMENT & PRESERVATION Take steps to clear, re-seed and perform low impact development on the 38 acre sand prairie and adjacent McCollister property acquired in 2004/05. The primary objective is to re-introduce sand prairie grasses in this area and construct a nature trail and small parking area. $281,000 69 SCANLON ELEVATED RUNNING/WALKING TRACK Construct an elevated running/walking track in the Scanlon Gym facility. $906,000 70 SOCCER PARK POND Construct a pond at Kickers Soccer Park to accommodate a field irrigation system. $348,000 71 WEST SIDE PARK Acquire and develop land for a major new park in the west part of the city, as recommended in the Parks & Recreation Master Plan. $1,751,000 9 - Other Projects 72 BURLINGTON STREET MEDIAN Construct the Burlington Street median from Gilbert Street to Madison Street. Project includes relocation of water and sewer utilities. This project will require a traffic signal preemption system. $1,916,000 73 CEMETERY MAUSOLEUM Construction of a mausoleum.$393,000 74 CHAUNCEY SWAN FOUNTAIN This project involves the reuse of components of the old City plaza fountain. $125,000 75 POLICE EVIDENCE STORAGE FACILITY Construction of a permanent evidence storage facility.$902,000 76 FIBER OPTIC SYSTEM This project connects outlying City buildings onto the fiber optic backbone, greatly increasing data transmission capacity. $393,000 77 FIRE STATION #1 RELOCATION Relocate and expand / modernize Central Fire Station #1. $11,255,000 C - 56 City of Iowa City Capital Improvements Program Unfunded Projects 78 FIRE STATION #5 Construction of Fire Station #5 in the South Planning District. $2,814,000 79 FIRE STATION #6 Construction of Fire Station #6 in the Southwest Planning District. $2,814,000 80 FIRE TRAINING FACILITY This project will construct a state of the art fire training facility to address all aspects of emergency service delivery including fire suppression, emergency medical services, hazardous material releases and rescue. The facility will be used for new recruits, continuing education for firefighters, and shared with the Johnson County Mutual Aid Association. $1,001,000 81 FLOOD BUYOUTS This project will provide funds for the purchase of houses in designated flood hazard buyout areas after FEMA and CDBG buyout programs have ended. $515,000 82 IOWA RIVER BANK STABILIZATION PROJECT This project will stabilze the Iowa River banks at a number of locations throughout the city that have experienced significant erosion after the 2008 Flood. $2,060,000 83 EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE FACILITY Construction of new Equipment Maintenance Facility at the So. Gilbert St. Public Works site, replacing the existing facility at Riverside Dr. $9,179,000 84 STREETS AND WATER DISTRIBUTION FACILITY Construct new building at the So. Gilbert St. Public Works site to accommodate the Streets, Traffic Engineering, Refuse, and Water Distribution Divisions. $6,669,000 85 RIVERSIDE DRIVE REDEVELOPMENT This project includes methane abatement, excavation, and fill at the 7 acre site owned by the City at Riverside Dr. and Hwy 6. This site preparation would allow for marketing of this property for commercial development. $2,453,000 86 SUMMIT ST. HISTORIC PLAN Streetscape and intersection elements through Summit Street Historic District. $293,000 87 NEIGHBORHOOD PEDESTRIAN LIGHTING Provide pedestrian scale lighting in neighborhoods.$103,000 88 TRAFFIC SIGNAL PRE- EMPTION SYSTEM This project will install a city-wide Geographic Information System based traffic signal pre-emption system for emergency vehicles. This system is necessary when the Burlington St Median Project is constructed between Madison St and Gilbert St. $1,185,000 GRAND TOTAL - ALL PROJECTS:227,085,000$ C - 57 C - 58