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Annual Report FY22 FinalTo improve quality of life, the Iowa City Housing Authority acts as a community leader for affordable housing, family self-sufficiency, and homeownership opportunities. Date: June 30, 2022 Annual Plan — 2022 Page 2 Table of Contents Pages Staff 3 Executive Summary 4-5 Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program 6 Public Housing Program 7 Family Characteristics 8-9 Public Housing Waiting List 10 Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Waiting List 11 Promoting Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) & Homeownership 12-15 Funding for Calendar Year 2022 16 Housing Authority Funding Sources Summary 17-18 Partnerships and Community Collaborations 19 Staff Housing Program Assistant Robin Butler Housing Program Assistant Elaine Cooper Housing Program Assistant Carri Fox-Rummelhart Housing Program Assistant Diana Huff Office Manager Jennifer Gosch Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Coordinator Mary Abboud Public Housing/Homeownership Coordinator Pat MacKay Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Program Coordinator Heidi Wolf Housing Administrator Housing Receptionist Georgia Black Housing Receptionist Jamila Shing-Hon Housing Program Assistant Lindsay Schuchert Annual Plan — 2022 Page 3 Page 4 Executive Summary The Housing Authority works to improve the quality of life for clients, acting as a community leader on affordable housing by providing information and education, housing assistance, and public and private partnership opportunities. The Housing Authority is a division of the City of Iowa City established in 1969 to administer housing assistance programs throughout its jurisdiction, including all of Johnson County, Iowa County and a portion of Washington County We currently assist more than 1,500+ disabled, elderly & low-income working families to acquire and maintain affordable housing through rental and ownership programs. The Annual Plan provides details about the Housing Authority’s current pro- grams and the resident population served, as well as the PHA’s strategy for ad- dressing the housing needs of currently assisted families and the larger communi- ty. The Annual Plan also serves as the annual application for grants to support improvements to public housing buildings (Capital Fund Program) Iowa City Housing Authority Rental Assistance Portfolio: Housing Choice Vouchers (HCV) = 1,191 Veterans’ Supportive Housing Vouchers (VASH) = 95 Mainstream Vouchers = 78 Emergency Housing Vouchers (EHV) = 69 Project-Based Vouchers Cross Park Place = 24 Public Housing Units = 86 City-Owned Affordable Rental Units = 16 TOTAL Vouchers/Units = 1,559 Housing Choice Vouchers (HCV): The Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCV) is designed with the intent of increasing affordable housing choices for elderly persons, persons with disabilities. & low-income working families. Partici- pants with a HCV voucher choose and lease safe, decent, and affordable private- ly owned rental housing. Applicant pool: Applicants are selected from a wait- ing list. Veterans Supportive Housing Vouchers (VASH): The VASH program implemented the Housing First concept for the delivery of services. Housing First places permanent housing with supports at the foundation for success and stability, including better access and outcomes with treatment services. The VASH program serves Veterans experiencing the most significant challenges to housing stability, including chronic homelessness, severe mental illness, and other significant barriers. Applicant pool: The Housing Authority receives direct referrals from Iowa City Veterans Administration Health Care System. Annual Plan — 2022 Page 5 Mainstream Vouchers: Mainstream vouchers Eligible participants are non- elderly persons with a disabling condition currently experiencing homelessness, previously experienced homelessness and currently a client in a permanent sup- portive housing or rapid rehousing project, or those at risk of experiencing homelessness. Applicant pool: The Housing Authority receives direct referrals from the Continuum of Care/Coordinated Entry Service Delivery System. Emergency Housing Vouchers (EHV): EHV vouchers are a Housing First concept for the delivery of services. Eligible participants are individuals and fami- lies who are (1) homeless, (2) at risk of homelessness, (3) fleeing, or attempting to flee, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, or human trafficking, or (4) recently homeless. Applicant pool: The Housing Authority receives direct referrals from the Continuum of Care/Coordinated Entry Ser- vice Delivery System. Project –Based Voucher Cross Park Place: Cross Park Place is Housing First project providing permanent supportive housing for homeless individuals/ households with a disabling condition. The Iowa City Housing Authority con- verted 24 of our HCV tenant-based vouchers to project-based vouchers to provide financial support to the project.. Applicant pool: The Housing Author- ity receives direct referrals from the Continuum of Care/Coordinated Entry Service Delivery System. Public Housing Units: Public housing provides affordable, decent and safe rental housing for elderly persons, persons with disabilities. & low-income work- ing families. The Iowa City Housing Authority owns and manages the units. Ap- plicant pool: Applicants are selected from a waiting list. City-Owned Affordable Rental Units: City Council approved the develop- ment of 16 Affordable Rental units to serve eligible persons whose income is below 80% of the median income for the household size. Peninsula Apartments contains 10 units and Augusta Place contains six (6). Applicant pool: Appli- cants are selected from a waiting list. Comparing the Iowa City Housing Authority to the other 71 Housing Authorities in the State of Iowa. Effective dates included: September 1, 2020—December 31, 2021: ICHA participants have higher average annual incomes - $14,613 vs. $13,231; The ICHA assists more working families – 38% vs. 28%; The ICHA assists fewer families receiving welfare – 3% vs. 15%; ICHA participants pay a higher average monthly amount of the contract rent - $346 vs. $311. HCV Economic Impact: For Calendar Year 2021 (CY21), the Housing Choice Voucher program paid approximately $8.3 million in Housing Assistance Pay- ments (HAP) to landlords/owners of rental properties in Johnson County. The vouchers in use, as of 1/4/22, in Iowa City (975) represents 5% of the total number of rental units (19,491) in the City of Iowa City. Following is the overall voucher utilization by geographic area: Housing Choice Voucher Program Page 6 Voucher Utilization by area, as of 1/4/2022 (total = 1,375) Total Population * % of Total Johnson County Incorporated Population Total Vouchers By Location % Total Voucher Utilization Iowa City 74,942 50.00% 975 70.9% Coralville 22,259 13.90% 221 16.1% North Liberty 19,227 13.40% 102 7.4% Other Johnson County Cities 5,179 6.00% 27 2.0% Port Outs N/A N/A 50 3.6% Johnson County Total Population 150,685 Johnson County Incorporated 121,607 % of Johnson County Population Living in Incorporated areas = 81% * Source: U.S. Decennial Census and ACS 2015-2019 5-Year Estimate Public housing was established to provide affordable, decent and safe rental housing for eligible low-income families, elderly persons, and persons with disabilities. The U.S. Depart- ment of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) distributes federal subsidies to the Iowa City Housing Authority (ICHA), which owns and manages the housing. The eighty-six (86) Public Housing units are low-density and constructed to conform and blend into the existing neighborhood architecture. The 86 Public Housing units represent half (1/2) of 1% of the total number of rental units in the City of Iowa City. Public Housing Economic Impact for the City of Iowa City: Total CY21 rental income from Public Housing properties = $290,086 Payment in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) paid to the Johnson County Assessor for the Public Housing properties in CY21 = $43,302 In CY21, the Housing Authority paid $451,324 to private sector Iowa City contractors for the capital improvement, general maintenance and repair of the Public Housing properties. Public Housing Annual Plan — 2022 Page 7 Public Housing Units by Iowa City Planning Districts Total by Location Total Occupied 6/1/2022 Northeast 5 5 Central 8 8 Southeast 32 29 Southwest 3 3 South 33 31 Downtown 5 5 TOTAL 86 81 Page 8 Family Characteristics Household Characteristics. Total Families as reported to HUD: September 1, 2020 — December 31, 2021 Family Type by Head-of-Household (HOH) Count % of Total Disabled and/or Elderly HOH 815 58% Non-Elderly/Non-Disabled HOH 597 42% Total 1412 100% Family Composition by Household Count % of Total Households without children 782 55% Households with Children 630 45% Total 1412 100% Race by HOH Count % of Total White HOH 664 47% Black/African American HOH 706 50% All Other Races HOH 42 3% Total 1412 100% Ethnicity by HOH Count % of Total Non-Hispanic HOH 1341 95% Hispanic HOH 71 5% Total 1412 100% ICHA Participant Characteristics. Definition of Participant (participant family): A person or family that has been admitted to the Iowa City Housing Authority’s HCV, VASH or Public Hous- ing program and is currently receiving housing assistance. Income Sources: Total Families = 1,412 as reported to HUD: September 1, 2020 — December 31, 2021 (All Family Members: Many Families Have Multiple Sources of Income): · Social Security (SS)/Supplemental Security (SSI) = 59% · Employment = 38% · Family Investment Program (FIP/Welfare) = 3% · With any Other Income = 12% * · No Income = 11% * Child Support, Self-Employment, Unemployment Insurance, Other Non-Wage Sources. January 4, 2022 point-in-time count: Only 14 of the total 1,412 assisted households are reporting Family Investment Program (FIP) as the sole source of household income. FIP provides temporary financial and other assistance to low income families with children while they move toward self-sufficiency. This amounts to <1% of all currently assisted households. Length of Participation as reported to HUD: 1,412 as reported to HUD: Sep- tember 1, 2020—December 31, 2021 · Less than 1 year = 297 (21%) · 1 to 5 years = 409 (29%) · 5 to 10 years = 339 (24%) · 10 to 20 years = 282 (20%) · Over 20 years = 85 (6%) Annual Plan — 2022 Page 9 Family Characteristics (continued) Applicant (applicant family): A person or family that has applied for admission to the Iowa City Housing Authority’s Public Housing program but is not yet a participant. Eligibility for housing programs is not established until applicants reach the top of the waiting list and their Preliminary Application for Assistance is processed. The Iowa City Housing Authority’s jurisdiction is Johnson County, Iowa; Iowa County, Iowa; and, Washington County, Iowa, North of Highway 92. The general applicant pool from which the Housing Authority draws to determine program eligibility are elderly, disabled, and families with children under the age of 18 who are residents (have a legal domicile) or are employed, in our jurisdiction (Johnson County, Iowa County, and Washington County N of HWY 92). When vacancies exist, the Housing Authority draws applicants from this pool by date and time of application and only those applications of families who qualify for the bed- room size of the available Public Housing units. The eligibility determination process includes verification of residency, family composition, eligibility status, and a national criminal background check conducted through the Iowa Department of Criminal In- vestigation and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Page 10 Public Housing Waiting List May 18, 2022 Public Housing Waiting List Elderly, disabled, and families with children under the age of 18 who are residents (have a legal domicile) or are employed, in our jurisdiction. Number of Applicants by Head-of- Household % of Applicants by Head-of- Household 946* 100% Elderly 109 12% Disabled 403 43% Families w/minor Children 571 60% White Head of Household 334 35% Black/African American Head of Household 438 46% All Other Races/Multipl Races reported 174 18% Hispanic Head of Household 64 7% * An additional 11,609 applicants are on the list in lower preference categories (Head-of-Household totals do not add up to 100% because individuals can be counted in multiple categories): The HCV waiting list shares the majority of the characteristics described in the Public Housing section. There is a great deal of duplication as the majority of applicants apply to both lists. For HCV applications, bedroom size is not taken into consideration. When vouchers are available, the Housing Authority draws applications, by date & time of application, from the applicant pool that contains elderly, disabled, and families with children under the age of 18 who are residents (have a legal domicile) or are employed, in our jurisdiction (Johnson County, Iowa County, and Washington County N of HWY 92). The eligibility determination process includes verification of residency, family composi- tion, eligibility status, and a national criminal background check conducted through the Iowa Department of Criminal Investigation and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Annual Plan — 2022 Page 11 HCV Waiting List May 18, 2022 Housing Choice Voucher Waiting List Elderly, disabled, and families with children under the age of 18 who are residents (have a legal domicile) or are employed, in our jurisdiction. Number of Applicants by Head-of- Household % of Appli- cants by Head-of- Household 1920 * 100% Elderly 277 14% Disabled 908 47% Families w/minor Children 1025 53% White Head of Household 789 41% Black/African American Head of Household 808 42% All Other Races/Multipl Races reported 323 17% Hispanic Head of Household 213 11% * An additional 26,157 applicants are on the list in lower preference categories (Head- of-Household totals do not add up to 100% because individuals can be counted in multi- ple categories): Page 12 Promoting Self-Sufficiency & Homeownership The Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) Pro- gram: Promotes self-sufficiency and asset develop- ment by providing supportive services to partici- pants to increase their employability, to increase the number of employed participants, and to encourage increased savings through an escrow savings pro- gram. Through our Self-Sufficiency programs, the Housing Authority is helping low income families bridge the economic gap by building assets, improving employment opportunities, and tran- sitioning from renters of units to owners of homes. FSS Enrollment Data (CY2021): Total FSS participants = 225 Participants with an escrow savings account = 200 (89%) Average monthly escrow savings deposit (participants with an escrow balance) = $296 Households with increased income = 135 Percentage of households with increased income = 59% FSS Graduates = 32 FSS Point in Time Data (5/19/2022) Average monthly escrow savings deposit = $339 Average escrow savings account balance =$6,370 Highest escrow savings account balance = $50,867 Workshop Accreditations: “Money Smart”: Federal Deposit and Insurance Corporation (FDIC). FSS Program Coordinating Committee: The FSS Program Coordinating Committee has been replaced with three (3) already existing wider-reaching networks that have lessened the duplication of effort in leveraging community resources to promote self-sufficiency among FSS program participants. The FSS coordinator has joined the Community Reentry Network of Johnson County Area which includes representatives from educational institutions, em- ployment services, government agencies, housing agencies, neighborhood cen- ters, labor programs and family services. Participating entities: Center for Worker Justice. Goodwill of the Heartland. Inside Out Reentry. Iowa City Housing Authority. Iowa Department of Corrections, 6th Judicial District. Iowa Works. Jane Boyd Community House. Kirkwood Community College. Labor Ready. Neighborhood Centers of Johnson County. Shelter House. Teamsters Local 238. The Iowa City Housing Authority is also a partner in the Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) one-stop career center service delivery system. WIOA reinforces the partnerships and strategies necessary for one-stops to provide job seekers and workers with the high-quality career services, educa- tion and training, and supportive services they need to get good jobs and stay employed, and to help businesses find skilled workers and access other sup- ports, including education and training for their current workforce. Participating entities: Kirkwood Community College. Iowa Workforce Development. Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation. Iowa Department for the Blind. Experience Works. AARP. Promoting Self-Sufficiency & Homeownership (continued) Page 13 Denison Job Corps. Ottumwa Job Corps. Proteus. Hawkeye Community Action Agency. Cedar Rapids Housing Authority. Iowa City Housing Authority. Interagency Case Management Sub-Committee of the Local Homeless Coordi- nating Board. This group meets to ensure coordination of services provided to families, improve collaboration of services, identify unmet needs, and seek solu- tions. Participating entities: City of Iowa City. Domestic Violence Intervention Program. Hawkeye Community Action Program (HACAP) Iowa City Community School District. Iowa City Housing Authority. Iowa Legal Aid. Johnson County Social Services. Prelude Behavioral Services. Salvation Army. Shelter House. United Action for Youth. Homeownership Programs: FSS Homeownership: Through our FSS program, many families have used their escrow savings accounts and private mortgages to attain homeownership independent of the Housing Authority programs. Sixty-two (62) FSS graduates have moved to homeownership. HCV Homeownership Program: Eligible participants have the option of purchasing a home with their HCV assistance rather than renting. Forty-eight (48) HCV Vouchers have been used to purchase homes since January 2003; Fifteen (15) HCV Vouchers are currently active. Tenant-to-Ownership Program (TOP): The Tenant-to-Ownership Pro- gram is funded by HUD. The TOP program offered opportunities for low to very low-income families to purchase single-family homes owned by the Housing Authority. Promoting Self-Sufficiency & Homeownership (continued) Page 14 Annual Plan — 2022 Promoting Self-Sufficiency & Homeownership (continued) Annual Plan — 2022 Page 15 Twenty-six (26) homes have been sold and ten (10) resold since May 1998. Affordable Dream Home Ownership Program (ADHOP): The Afforda- ble Dream Home Ownership Program is operated, managed and funded solely by the ICHA. It offers opportunities for income eligible families to purchase newly constructed homes, newer homes, or resale of homes purchased through the TOP/ADHOP programs. Sixteen (16) homes (10 “Universal Design” homes) were built and sold since May 1999. Down Payment Assistance Program — Grant Award $187,500: Funded with Fiscal Year 2009 HOME funds. First-time homebuyers with a household income of less than 80% of the Area Median Income (AMI) may be eligible for a forgivable loan for down payment assistance. At the date of this publication: 20 families purchased homes (total funds expended) = $187,500 Families with household income 60-80% of AMI = 11 Families with household income <60% of AMI = 9 UniverCity Neighborhood Partnership: The UniverCity Neighborhood Partnership is an effort by the City of Iowa City focusing on neighborhoods located near the University campus that retain a single-family character and a demand for single-family housing, but that also have a large renter population. From May 2011 to May 2015, the Iowa City Housing Authority provided $102,276 in down payment assistance to sixteen (16) families purchasing a Uni- verCity home. In FY2014, the ICHA allocated $170,000 to the UniverCity Neighborhood Part- nership for the rehabilitation of homes purchased by the City of Iowa City. In FY 2015, an additional $20,000 was allocated for rehabilitation of homes. From June 2014 to September 2015, ICHA funds in the amount of $165,164.25 were used for the rehabilitation of eight (8) homes purchased by the City of Iowa City. Annual Plan — 2022 Page 16 Funding for Calendar Year (CY) 2022 The United States Congress allocates funding and passes laws for all housing programs. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) role in the locally administered housing programs is to allocate money to local housing authorities and to develop policy, regulations and other guidance that interprets housing legislation. Housing Choice Voucher Program CY22 Housing Assistance Payments = $8,313,683 Administrative Fees = $1,090,121 Family Self-Sufficiency Grant = $138,636 Fraud Recovery = $137,626 Total HCV Program CY22 = $9,680,066 Public Housing CY22 Operating Subsidy = $179,857 Rental Income = $260,930 Reimbursement of Expenses/Fraud Recovery = $12,627 Capital Funds Program (CFP) = $180,724 Total Public Housing CY22 = $633,778 Total Housing Authority Funding CY22 = $10,313,844 Page 17 ICHA income and cash sources. The uses of the cash sources are based on relevant HUD notices and signed agreements between the Housing Authority and HUD. Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Administrative Fees Administrative fees are available to the ICHA for the operation and manage- ment of the HCV program. Starting January 31, 2004, HUD and Congress, through the approval of the Annual Appropriations Act, restricted the use of ad- ministrative fee income to activities related to the HCV tenant-based rental assis- tance and related development activities (PIH Notice 2008-15). Housing Assistance Payments (HAP) HUD provided funds to cover the housing subsidy paid to owners/landlords directly by the ICHA on behalf of the participating family. The family pays the difference between the actual rent charged by the landlord and the amount subsidized by the program. Under certain circumstances, if authorized by the ICHA, a family may use its voucher to purchase a modest home. HUD/Veterans’ Affairs Supportive Housing (VASH) This is tenant based rental assistance funds targeting homeless veterans partici- pating in VA Case Management Services. Family Self-Sufficiency (FSS) The FSS program is a tenant self-sufficiency work incentive program. ICHA estab- lishes cash accounts for FSS program participants that will be available to them if they complete the program. ICHA’s contributions to these accounts are funded by HUD through the ICHA’s regular funding process. FSS cash is not available to ICHA for any other use. Public Housing Operations Under Section 9(3) of the Housing Act of 1937, Operating Funds are available to the ICHA for the operation and management of the Public Housing program. These funds assist the ICHA in bridging the gap between the rent collected and the operating expenses of the program. Operating cash is only available for the use and benefit of public housing units and residents. Iowa City Housing Authority (ICHA) Funding Sources Annual Plan — 2022 Page 18 Housing Authority Capitol Fund Grants HUD provides funds to the ICHA to improve the physical condition, upgrade the management and operation and carry out other activities for Public Housing developments. These funds are primarily used for general maintenance and re- pair of the Public Housing units. As necessary, these funds will also be used to upgrade structures, interiors, HVAC systems and appliances. Capital Funds are calculated and allocated by an established formula. Affordable Dream Homeownership Program (ADHOP) On September 3, 1993, the ICHA entered into a Section 5(h) Agreement with HUD. The purpose of this program is to create affordable home ownership oppor- tunities throughout Iowa City. This agreement authorizes the ICHA to sell Public Housing units and use the sales proceeds to construct or purchase homes for reha- bilitation to continue the cycle. To ensure affordability, the ICHA provides a sec- ond mortgage for the homeowners. Broadway Sales Proceeds ICHA received approval from HUD for the sale of 18 units at 1926/1946 Broadway Street, Iowa City, Iowa. Per the approved plan submitted to HUD, the sales pro- ceeds were to be used for the development of 18 low-density scattered site re- placement units that would be more efficiently and effectively operated as lower income housing. There is no other permissible use of these funds per the agree- ment. Public Housing Tenant Security Deposits The ICHA holds security deposits until tenants vacate units. At that time, the ten- ants receive a full or partial refund depending on such factors as remaining rental or other charges outstanding and reimbursement of damage repairs. Tenant security deposit cash is not available to ICHA for any other use. Annual Plan — 2022 Page 19 Partnerships and Community Collaborations University of Iowa School of Social Work. Women's Resource and Action Center (WRAC). Montessori School. Goodwill of the Heartland. Habitat for Humanity. Iowa Women’s Foundation. Iowa City Junior Service League. Shelter House. Iowa State University (ISU) Extension. Iowa City Area Association of Realtors. Hawkeye Area Community Action Program (HACAP). Foster Grandparents Program. The Housing Trust Fund of Johnson County (HTFJC). City of Iowa City Parks & Recreation. City of Iowa City Neighborhood Services. Iowa City Public Library. Iowa City Human Rights Commission. Domestic Violence Intervention Project (DVIP). Johnson County Department of Public Health. Horizons Community Credit Counseling. Johnson County Local Homeless Coordinating Board. Cross Park Place. Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act (WIOA) Partners. Veterans’ Administration. Kirkwood Community College. Reentry Network of Johnson County. Crisis Center. ABBE Center for Community Mental Health. Iowa City Community School District. Community Transportation Committee. Phone: (319) 356-5400 FAX: (319) 356-5459 Web: www.icgov.org/icha Page 20 We provide: Information and education, Housing assistance, Public and private partnership opportunities.